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Bottom round rump roast


Fernwood
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Market had an extra-special price for "bottom round rump roast" but this particular piece was much better-marbled than most.  I buy a lot of chuck but rarely round.  Is pot roast the best use?  Is there anything else worth considering?  [I do not have gear to cook something like this sous vide.]  

Rump roast.jpg

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  • 4 years later...

I bought a 4.5 lb beef round boneless rump roast (while recovering from anaesthesia) which I've just found in the fridge. I've no idea what to do with it.

 

Can I sous vide? Do I slice it in two first?

 

Or I could also do in the Anova steam oven?

 

Time and temp?

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Sous vide, in a bath or in the oven, will probably give you the most useful finished product. Which then might be good, sliced thinly, as for a sandwich.

 

Just don't do anesthesia before you turn the oven on.  

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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26 minutes ago, TdeV said:

4.5 lb beef round boneless rump roast

That's a good hunk of meat. If you don't need it all, consider taking off a few slices to use as 'schnitzel'. I use mostly top round to make the Italian version, coteletta. I make coteletti in sizeable batches because, crumbed and ready to go, they freeze well, don't take long to defrost and are a simple meal on a busy night. Just a thought.

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Id do SV .

 

cut into ' manageable ' chunks .

 

consider RedBoat40   in the frig for a few days for a couple of hunks

 

over a rack so the RB40 seeps into the meat , and the meat dries out a lilttle

 

then SV , 130 F for at least 24 hrs , maybe even 36.

 

rapidly chill , refrigerate or freeze.

 

thaw ( if from frozen ) in the refrigerator , then slice thinly while still

 

firm , and bring to room temp for a very tasty beef sandwich.

 

save the Jus out of the bad and sprinkle on the sandwich

 

if you do RB40 for a few and have a few w/o  , you can taste the difference

 

between them , and decided for later which you like.

 

RB40 does not taste fishy when cooked.

 

its a bit like aged meat ,  just a bit

Edited by rotuts (log)
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I’ve corned rump roast before. Corn, SV as @rotuts describes, chill and then smoke.

 

A local place uses rump roast, cooked quite rare, for something they call Greek beef, which tastes like it was sliced and then marinated in an oil and vinegar dressing. Tasty sandwiches, and fine on a salad.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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I only did it once , on each side.  thee were ' slab ' meat

 

5 - 6 drops per side , evened out , 

 

more would be OK  want to coat the entire surface 

 

each side , then wait.

 

you can turn it in a day or two if you like.

 

then SV.

 

best stuff ever for mSteak Sandwiched.

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On 2/20/2022 at 10:49 AM, TdeV said:

@FlashJack, thanks. How thick do you cut the slices?

Apols for the delay.

 

About 1/4 inch (~6mm). A little thicker is fine because you're going to give it a gentle hammering. These work with surprisingly thin slices -- the whole point is to make a little protein go a long way. But they are better if a little more generous.

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On 2/19/2022 at 6:00 PM, weinoo said:

Sous vide, in a bath or in the oven, will probably give you the most useful finished product. Which then might be good, sliced thinly, as for a sandwich.

 

 

Agreed.  SV works well for a lean roast.  Although your bottom round rump looks more marbled than most

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Just now, scubadoo97 said:

Agreed.  SV works well for a lean roast.  Although your bottom round rump looks more marbled than most

I don't think we know what @TdeV's bottom looks like - the one at the top of this thread is not the same poster.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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@TdeV 

 

Ive only done the RB4 refrigerator cure

 

w sirloin streaks

 

1.5 "    I did those for 6 - 8 h 130.1

 

delicious sliced thin , against the grain for a steak sand.

 

I d try 24 H 130.1

 

I don't want to recumbent 36 

 

in case the RB40  changed the tenderness.

 

but this cut , w/o the RB :

 

36 would be nice.

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@rotuts.

This is 28.5 hours @ 130°F for slices with the RB40 treatment, then air dried for 3 days, and sous vide treatment. Chewy, great flavour.

Sorry there's no sautéed green beans or baked potato. (I forgot).

Dinner was scrumptious!

 

IMG_3869cropped_s.thumb.jpg.df549316dabfc3d6e1c658bd50e9e502.jpg

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2 hours ago, TdeV said:

@rotuts.

This is 28.5 hours @ 130°F for slices with the RB40 treatment, then air dried for 3 days, and sous vide treatment. Chewy, great flavour.

Sorry there's no sautéed green beans or baked potato. (I forgot).

Dinner was scrumptious!

 

IMG_3869cropped_s.thumb.jpg.df549316dabfc3d6e1c658bd50e9e502.jpg

 To clarify... You did RB40 for a few days... air dried and then sous vide?

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9 hours ago, gfweb said:

 To clarify... You did RB40 for a few days... air dried and then sous vide?

 

The RB40 was painted on once only (but thickly), then air dried for 3 days, then sous vide 28.5 hours. The meat was then dried and dropped into a very hot pan for 30 seconds on each side.

 

 

Edited by TdeV
Clarity (log)
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@TdeV 

 

fantastic !

 

consider a steak sandwich 

 

w thinly sliced meat ( brought to room temp )

 

but consider turning the ' hunk ' 90 degrees

 

then the thin slices are against the grain.

 

no leftovers you say ?

 

next time you see a hunk of meat on sale

 

do several @ a time  almost the same amount of work.

 

and then chill // freeze in the SV bags for later.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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  • 2 weeks later...

@rotuts Had a last minute Wine Time With Eats in the backyard yesterday, so whipped out one of these , sv 122°F for ~1 hour to thaw, seared in a hot pan, and sliced thinly. Served along with slab country pâté, olives, dates, and several crackers.

 

One of the guests is a longtime tailgating barbecuer. He remarked "Wow. Amazingly tender for that cut. Fully explains the treatment."

 

High praise indeed. Especially since he is fundamentally dubious about sous vide.

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SV  ****  stars **** for CB  and its equivalent .

 

I have thought about putti g a little water in each SV bag

 

about and ice cube worth or so 

 

to mimic a little of the effect of plain water 

 

ie simmering CB in a large pot of water for several hours 

 

but the cold water after cooking , but before eating

 

works fine for me.

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