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gfron1

Product use question - mixed grain

6 posts in this topic

Host's note: this topic was moved from its original location in Japan: Cooking to China: Cooking because of information in the second post.

 

I bought this because it looks like something I'd enjoy.  A mix of grains (millet, oat, lentil, black rice, brown rice and others) but I'm not sure how to use it. My guess, based on the photo, is to add sticky rice - I'm thinking I could do it all in my rice cooker and I'm guessing at a 2:1 ratio on the brown rice setting. The photo is a rice cake so i wonder if I need to add sugar and liquid like sushi. Any better advice? [btw, I posted this in Japan Cooking but some of the text looks Korean and the product is from Taiwan so I have no idea.]

IMAG1186.jpg

IMAG1187.jpg


Edited by Smithy Added host's note (log)

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51 minutes ago, gfron1 said:

[btw, I posted this in Japan Cooking but some of the text looks Korean and the product is from Taiwan so I have no idea.]

 

No. The text is all Chinese.

I just saw this before going to bed, but I'll be happy to translate in the morning if no one gets there before me.


Edited by liuzhou (log)
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I've woken up!

You were certainly correct about the product being from Taiwan. This slowed down my translation as

 

a) The Chinese is in traditional characters, now only really used in Taiwan and Hong Kong (as well as among much of the Chinese diaspora), but not the writing system I am most familiar with - the simplified version used on the mainland.

 

b) Some of it is the Minnan dialect spoken in parts of Fujian province and in Taiwan.

Anyway, to get to the point. At first I translated it more or less literally, intending to reword later. But the literal seemed clear enough and somewhat amusing so I've left most of it as it was at first. I've spared you the marketing guff on the front of the pack and at the top of the back. I guess you just wanted the instructions. Here you go:

 

How to make “ten grains rice"naturally delicious and chewy.

1. Wash rice: Your action should be light and fast; pour water for a minute. Repeat wash 2-3 times.

2. Add water: The proportion should be right. A cup of grains needs 1-1.2 cup water (advice: electric rice cooker one cup)

3. Water quality is important: Try not to use tap water; it's better to use water from the water purifier.

4. Soak rice: Soak before cooking. Let rice absorb water. One hour in summer, two hours in winter.

5. Add oil: it is better to add a little olive oil or vegetable oil; the grains will become clear and crystal.

6. Cook rice: Just put it in the electric rice cooker.7. Stew rice: It must stew 20-30 minutes after cooking. After that you can lift the lid.

8. Separate rice: Stir the rice to release moisture and separate grains. 

9. Finished. Delicious and chewy grains are finished!

10. Rice preservation. Keep reserved cooked grain in electric cooker for no more than 12 hours.

11. Long term preservation: Divide the cooked grain into portions and freeze. To use, heat in a microwave oven for three minutes to warm up.

(with thanks to my friend Xie Kunyu for assistance with the harder words!)


Note: You may have noticed that sometimes I say rice; sometimes grains. The Chinese character is the same. Really it just means the mix in the bag,


Edited by liuzhou acjnowledgement of help (log)
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By the way, these grain mixes are very common in China. I counted eight different combinations in my local supermarket this morning. On the mainland they are used to make what is called 八宝粥 - bā bǎo zhōu, literally 'eight treasure porridge', a type of mixed grain congee/rice porridge.

 

I've never seen them used to make cakes, but I have never been toTaiwan, so maybe. 

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