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Breakfast! 2017 (Part 1)


Anna N
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On 2/1/2017 at 6:38 AM, shain said:

 

Mellow is Mallow with a typo :) 

 

Thank you.  That's kind of what I suspected but mallow isn't a commonly used herb in my kitchen so I thought I'd ask.

I am intrigued by the kookoo.  Do you have a favorite combination of ingredients or is the mallow-zucchini-onion-garlic combination the best? I noticed several of the recipes I found online include barberries and walnuts. 

I was thinking I might try to use muffin tins for individual servings or give them the sous vide egg bite treatment.  

 

Yesterday's breakfast was one of the aforementioned egg bites, reheated.  It was already pictured over on the sous vide thread so no need to repeat that. 

Today was bacon, egg and cheese on a roll:

IMG_4411 (1).jpg

 

 

 

Edited by blue_dolphin (log)
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@blue_dolphin

The mallow and zucchini definitely aren't common in a kookoo. The mallow just grows in everywhere, the zucchini looked good in the market.

 

You can use whatever herbs you like, but you should use a lot of them (parsley, scallions, cilantro, dill, mint, mallow, arugula and chard all come to mind).

I usually make it as follows:

  • 6 eggs
  • 1 bundle (about 70 g) parsley
  • same amount of dill
  • 1/2 the amount of cilantro 
  • 1 bundle scallions (about 100 g)
  • a few leaves of tarragon
  • 1-2 tspn turmeric
  • some chili, pepper, coriander, anise, cumin - whatever you feel like
  • about 2 tbspn flour
  • 1 tspn baking powder
  • salt to taste (about 2 tspn)
  • a little lemon
  • a handful of toasted walnuts / pistachios, coarsely chopped (about 50 g) - keep a few intact for decoration
  • You can add barberries or even cranberries to the batter
  • pomegranate kernels make a tasty garnish as well
  • I also like to serve it with greek yogurt.

Chop and mix it all. I like to bake mine, rather than fry it on a stove. Make sure to use a non stick pan or oil it well. 

I personally really like the look it have when served whole and sliced, but it will be great in personal servings.

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~ Shai N.

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image.jpeg

 

Damn!  Two badly poached eggs on creamy spinach with half of a toasted English muffin.  Mind was elsewhere. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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When I went out yesterday morning, I noticed that the local Xiao Long Bao shop had re-opened after being closed for a week for the Chinese New Year / Spring Festival holiday. I'd already eaten breakfast, but promised myself I'd go this morning.

 

20170204_100519.jpg

 

It had been raining, so she didn't have her sidewalk tables set out. No problem. I got my buns "to go".  Here's her "cooker" in close up.

20170204_100639.jpg

 

And my buns with chilli dip. A bit deformed from the journey home.

 

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Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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I had one last zucchini in the fridge, so before I put away the fry cooking oil from last night, I fried up some zucchini fries. Yesterday I took a hunk of Christmas ham out of the freezer and it all came together. I believe I will be skipping lunch today.

HC

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Clean-out-the-fridge breakfast concoction: Shallots, garlic, Serrano chiles, and cauliflower rice sauteed in olive oil. Added roasted Poblano chiles, sausage, feta cheese, and Mexican oregano, and then scrambled in the eggs with half and half. Breakfast was spicy and satisfying, and the fridge is much emptier. :)

 

 

Eggs_20170204-1.jpg

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Bruce, we're a hivemind;  I like to have my main meal of the day on Sundays at breakfast mostly just because it gives me a chance to rummage gleefully in my fridge, see what wonders I can find, and set about happily constructing a cooking project out of them.

 

Today, I had these beautiful baby king oyster mushrooms to use up, along with a handful of thinly-sliced wagyu beef, and some cooked rice. So I made Japanese curry beef fried rice a la @ladyandpups, with crispy garlic and ginger and a deeply-browned onion, Korean curry powder, Japanese curry roux blocks melted in, a pinch of dash granules, a lot of black pepper, a hit of cocoa powder to mysterious things up, and a nice slick of melty butter on top. Needed an egg on top, but my ova are ovah.

 

Along with some warm fresh soy milk and some cold blanched sesame spinach, I’m ready for my day and fighting fat. Fit. No, fat.

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IMG_2157.JPG

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12 hours ago, rarerollingobject said:

. . . it gives me a chance to rummage gleefully in my fridge, see what wonders I can find, and set about happily constructing a cooking project out of them.

 

 

Exactly! And a lovely cooking project you constructed, I must say.

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image.jpeg

 

Onions, mini peppers, mushrooms and bacon topped with a sunny side egg. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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9 hours ago, liuzhou said:

Cumin Beef Rou Jia Mo (孜然牛肉夹馍 zī rán niú ròu jiá mò) 。

 

 

Cool. Cumin is one of my favorite spices, but I don't recall encountering it in Chinese food. Is it a regional thing?

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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18 minutes ago, chromedome said:

Cool. Cumin is one of my favorite spices, but I don't recall encountering it in Chinese food. Is it a regional thing?

 

Cumin is very popular, particularly in the north and west. Lamb kebabs with cumin and chilli are sold all over China. They originated in the far western, mainly Muslim province of Xinjiang but every night market in the country offers them. Hunan cumin beef is also very well known. It is also used in Sichuan.

 

All my local shops from giant supermarkets to the mom 'n pop stores carry ground cumin. And I'm in the south and east!

Edited by liuzhou (log)

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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...and now I know. Thanks for the info. 

 

It's been a long time since I lived in Vancouver, where I ate a lot of Chinese. Here in Atlantic Canada it's pretty much just the westernized stuff in sticky sauces, and if you're lucky the local buffet at least does it fairly well (best one in my city is a block away, as it happens). I really must make a point of re-stocking my pantry and revisiting some appropriate cookbooks. 

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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3 minutes ago, chromedome said:

...and now I know. Thanks for the info. 

 

It's been a long time since I lived in Vancouver, where I ate a lot of Chinese. Here in Atlantic Canada it's pretty much just the westernized stuff in sticky sauces, and if you're lucky the local buffet at least does it fairly well (best one in my city is a block away, as it happens). I really must make a point of re-stocking my pantry and revisiting some appropriate cookbooks. 

 

I guess most of the Chinese food in Canada is of Cantonese origin. It tends not to use cumin.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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1 minute ago, liuzhou said:

 

I guess most of the Chinese food in Canada is of Cantonese origin. It tends not to use cumin.

 We are stretching our Chinese muscles but mostly in major urban areas.  

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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1 minute ago, Anna N said:

 We are stretching our Chinese muscles but mostly in major urban areas.  

 

Yes, I know it's changing as more Chinese from other areas of China are emigrating, but historically It would have been largely Cantonese.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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3 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

I guess most of the Chinese food in Canada is of Cantonese origin. It tends not to use cumin.

Probably, yeah. I think Vancouver was more diverse than most, from the sheer size of its Chinese-origin community, but I'm pretty sure it's predominantly Cantonese. I do remember Hunnan/Yunan places as well as the inevitable Sichuan, and also one Mongolian place before that term was subverted to mean "fried vaguely Asian mall food."

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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1 minute ago, liuzhou said:

 

Yes, I know it's changing as more Chinese from other areas of China are emigrating, but historically It would have been largely Cantonese.

 Absolutely. I would not argue that point.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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image.jpeg

 

Egg bite from Anova via Starbucks, quick Danish cucumber pickle, Campari tomatoes with some specialty salt that was languishing in the back of the cupboard. The egg bite was quite satisfactory. I did the bacon and Gruyere version replacing the cream cheese with 2% milk. Also following @Kerry Beal's example I used 8 ounce, widemouth mason jars.  I gave them a good coating of butter before filling them up with the egg mixture.  On the plate is one of them sliced in half. Next time I would make a couple of changes. I would crumble the bacon before adding it to the jar and I would add either some chopped chives or chopped scallions.  The texture was pleasant. Not a big rubbery. Do not think I would care to try and pick one up in my fingers, however. 

Edited by Anna N (log)
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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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