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Panasonic Countertop Induction Oven


palo
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7 hours ago, palo said:

http://panasonic.ca/cio/index.html?gclid=CM7K7s-K_dACFcS1wAodV3wP-g#hero

 

I'm mystified, the blurb states it uses a combination of infrared and induction to work BUT uses an aluminum pan. I'm not impressed by its price either $699 CDN

 

Unless I'm missing something, this won't find a home on my countertop!

 

p

The aluminum pan is not really mysterious since it is not in direct contact with the induction unit. It is the grill pan that is heated by induction. It must be used for everything. So it is the grill pan that transfers heat to whatever dish you use. 

Edited by Anna N (log)

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It is possible to use induction to heat up aluminum, but that requires ultra high frequency technology which is not what this CIO oven uses. 

 

Anna N is correct on how this Panasonic oven works.

 

I am curious if this oven will be good for cooking larger meals.

Your electric outlet can support only about 1800 watts of cooking power. Divide that by half for the top heating elements, and half for the bottom induction cooktop.

By definition, infrared electric heat inside an oven is almost 100% efficient, and induction is some what less efficient because part of the power goes to driving the induction electronics. In this case another part of the power will be needed to heat up all the metal inside.

 

dcarch

 

 

 

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10 hours ago, Anna N said:

The aluminum pan is not really mysterious since it is not in direct contact with the induction unit. It is the grill pan that is heated by induction. It must be used for everything. So it is the grill pan that transfers heat to whatever dish you use. 

 

So it's sort of like a hotplate or the element on an electric stove? Not too efficient to my way of thinking, the whole premise behind induction is that it directly heats the cooking vessel rather than something else heating and through conduction heating the cooking vessel which eventually heats the food...and the price???

 

p

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