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gfron1

Starting a high profile new restaurant (after closing another)

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2 minutes ago, gfron1 said:

.....a culinary school student that I met a few months ago at work who didn't know how to identify the top (v. the root) of an onion. It really has become my mission to eliminate that lack of connection.

 

No!!!! O.o

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4 minutes ago, gfron1 said:

 I'm so mindful of a culinary school student that I met a few months ago at work who didn't know how to identify the top (v. the root) of an onion. It really has become my mission to eliminate that lack of connection.

I was utterly boggled by some of my classmates' ignorance of food and cooking in the broad sense. One young lady in my class was incensed when the instructor told her she had to taste everything she cooked. Apparently -- I kid you not -- from earliest childhood onward, she'd eaten literally nothing but canned soup and boxed mac and cheese, and was livid at being told she would have to put other foods in her mouth. 

 

Apparently her reason for getting a culinary certificate was to work at a retirement home where she had an "in" due to nepotism. I feel for the residents, I really do. 

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2 minutes ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

 

No!!!! O.o

Final semester student from the top program in the city. :(

 

It's no different than back in New Mexico when I hired a cook who had worked in the other 4 nicer restaurants in town, and his first day happened to coincide with the day I picked up all of my county fair animals for butchering (4 goats, 2 lamb and a pig), and we spent the whole day breaking them down. He said it was the first time he had ever cut meat before for steaks or restaurant cuts. Crazy.

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I admit to being so shocked about the onion that I misread it as "the top (v. the roof) of an onion"  and thought to myself "well I couldn't identify the roof of an onion either".xD

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AND.  I had to look up Koji processed meat!  Fell down this rabbit hole. 

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I think the idea of the glass floor allowing a view of the cellar with its various growth and processing areas is wonderful, but some guests may not.  Will you have an alternative - an opaque walkway, for instance - for those who dislike heights or who might feel indecently exposed if a worker is below?

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12 minutes ago, Smithy said:

who might feel indecently exposed if a worker is below?

Guilty of being a guy on this. Hadn't even considered that. I'll have to think more about this. Might be resolved with parallel walkways -clear and solid.

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Maybe a sign..."No shirt, no shoes, no panties, no serviceO.o

I agree with the opaque glass for those who would feel more comfortable.  As an example, you will never catch me out on that glass bridge thing at the Grand Canyon.

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21 minutes ago, IowaDee said:

Maybe a sign..."No shirt, no shoes, no panties, no serviceO.o

I agree with the opaque glass for those who would feel more comfortable.  As an example, you will never catch me out on that glass bridge thing at the Grand Canyon.

what about the glass slide around the skyrise in downtown LA? :)

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Nope, I've seen that and I'll take a pass. I saw a tour of a home somewhere, Palm Springs maybe,   The owners had routed a small stream through their living room and out to the  large fish pond.  The indoor section was covered with glass and you could see koi swimming to and for.  How would that be for a seafood restaurant?   Okay, sorry to drag this off topic.

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2 hours ago, gfron1 said:

Guilty of being a guy on this. Hadn't even considered that. I'll have to think more about this. Might be resolved with parallel walkways -clear and solid.

xDxD

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3 hours ago, Smithy said:

I think the idea of the glass floor allowing a view of the cellar with its various growth and processing areas is wonderful, but some guests may not.  Will you have an alternative - an opaque walkway, for instance - for those who dislike heights or who might feel indecently exposed if a worker is below?

 

I was wondering the same thing.

 

I'm now also wondering about using some technology in the design and decoration in the sense of digital photo frames or similar that are easily updated so they could routinely be changed to include photos from recent foraging outings or closer photos of the activity in the basement rooms to allow guests to get a bit more up close and personal with the ingredients and the season and so on? I'm not sure if you'd actually want them to be able to display information about the ingredient also, perhaps only on request? (I'm picturing something where these are placed so that people seated at tables can still see them clearly and reach to interact if so desired.)

 

Dunno, just a thought. I do feel like in a city, some degree of visual aids as to the season in the 'wilderness' may help build a connection between the guests and the seasonal foods - many people don't know or forget what it looks like off the beaten path just a bit, and are used to seeing the seasons reflected in manicured lawns and the condition of streets. That does also require someone taking photos and preparing the material, though.

 

(I know you don't necessarily go trekking into the middle of nowhere to forage, so wilderness is relative.)

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Possibly something balcony style!?

A rectangular floor window surrounded by a railing.

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1 hour ago, quiet1 said:

I'm now also wondering about using some technology in the design and decoration in the sense of digital photo frames or similar that are easily updated so they could routinely be changed to include photos from recent foraging outings or closer photos of the activity in the basement rooms to allow guests to get a bit more up close and personal with the ingredients and the season and so on? I'm not sure if you'd actually want them to be able to display information about the ingredient also, perhaps only on request? (I'm picturing something where these are placed so that people seated at tables can still see them clearly and reach to interact if so desired.)

We've been exploring this idea as well.

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Personally, I thought the glass floor idea was awesome... to me, it is much more dramatic than having video, images, etc...  Plus, I love the idea of an enclosed walkway leading from the entryway to the dining room - it's very ummm dramatic.  I've seen this done very well in some places in NYC - there was a fancy Thai restaurant Kittichai (maybe it's still around?) that had a very dramatic dining room and a cool walkway from the entrance leading to it.  It was almost as if the walkway was suspended over a small stream.  Also, Bouley had a great entryway that was filled with fragrant apples - the second you walked through it, you were transported to a french-country type setting in the Northeast somewhere... like Connecticut or Massachusetts, or somewhere in NorthWest France...

 

So, if it's not possible to have your guests walk "through" the forest while entering the restaurant, to me, walking directly above it is pretty cool too.....

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Guess it depends on how much all that would cost...

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49 minutes ago, KennethT said:

Personally, I thought the glass floor idea was awesome... to me, it is much more dramatic than having video, images, etc...  Plus, I love the idea of an enclosed walkway leading from the entryway to the dining room - it's very ummm dramatic.  I've seen this done very well in some places in NYC - there was a fancy Thai restaurant Kittichai (maybe it's still around?) that had a very dramatic dining room and a cool walkway from the entrance leading to it.  It was almost as if the walkway was suspended over a small stream.  Also, Bouley had a great entryway that was filled with fragrant apples - the second you walked through it, you were transported to a french-country type setting in the Northeast somewhere... like Connecticut or Massachusetts, or somewhere in NorthWest France...

 

So, if it's not possible to have your guests walk "through" the forest while entering the restaurant, to me, walking directly above it is pretty cool too.....

 

I'm thinking the photos would be in addition to whatever is actually in-house. You create the feel with the in-house stuff and build curiosity, and then the photos feed the curiosity about the ingredients that aren't in-house.

 

But the glass walkway would be an issue for people - fear of heights, and, as pointed out, if you're wearing a skirt you might be quite uncomfortable walking across, especially with someone in the room underneath. 

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@quiet1I understand your feelings about the glass floor - both the skirt issue and the fear of heights.  Years ago, in Hong Kong, my wife and I took a cable car that had a completely clear glass floor... my wife would have had a nervous breakdown if she hadn't sat there with her eyes closed the whole time!

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3 hours ago, quiet1 said:

I know you don't necessarily go trekking into the middle of nowhere to forage, so wilderness is relative.


I'm pretty sure that's exactly where he goes to forage. At least, when it's an option. I don't know what the foraging grounds are like where he is now but it looked like the (beautiful and scenic) middle of nowhere was where he was trekking before the move.

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1 hour ago, Tri2Cook said:


I'm pretty sure that's exactly where he goes to forage. At least, when it's an option. I don't know what the foraging grounds are like where he is now but it looked like the (beautiful and scenic) middle of nowhere was where he was trekking before the move.

 

'It seems like sometimes you can find foraged stuff that's not nearly as far out in the middle of nowhere as you'd think, which is mostly what I meant. The photos need not be of grand sweeping picturesque vistas to be interesting - the edge of a stream or a close up of a tree trunk can be just as effective at reminding people what is around them. :)

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Loving all of the ideas floating around.  I just want to float a friendly reminder @gfron1, don't get too distracted by tons of cool ideas.  Trying to do everything usually ends up being a disaster.  I'm sure I don't need to say that, but sometimes it's just so much fun to explore everything.  I have that high-novelty personality and go off on tangents all the time, so just speaking from my own experience.

 

Based on your plan, I know you'll stay focused on your goal.  I can't wait to see how it all turns out.  It's so exciting!  :D

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I think your ideas are most interesting, Rob.  I will add one concern:  keeping that glass clean might be a pain in the ass?

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34 minutes ago, Shelby said:

I think your ideas are most interesting, Rob.  I will add one concern:  keeping that glass clean might be a pain in the ass?

I've thought about that and shared that with the designer. That will be a consideration in the material...or maybe we'll be the first socks only restaurant :)

10 hours ago, MrSpiffy said:

Loving all of the ideas floating around.  I just want to float a friendly reminder @gfron1, don't get too distracted by tons of cool ideas.  Trying to do everything usually ends up being a disaster.  I'm sure I don't need to say that, but sometimes it's just so much fun to explore everything.  I have that high-novelty personality and go off on tangents all the time, so just speaking from my own experience.

 

Based on your plan, I know you'll stay focused on your goal.  I can't wait to see how it all turns out.  It's so exciting!  :D

MrSpiffy - I appreciate the comments...and all the ideas being floated. The skirt over the glass floor is the perfect example of why I wanted to share my project. I did learn long ago to be open to ideas, but to stay true to my vision. At the end of the day the success or failure of Bulrush will be on my hands.

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@gfron1, I've done the same with some of my own personal projects.  (Woodworking, in particular.)  It's always helpful to get other perspectives to catch or suggest things that you may not have thought about.

 

As part of your connecting-with-your-food experience, will have an open kitchen so patrons can watch as their meals are prepared?

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