Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

David Ross

eG Cook-Off 74: Holiday Roasts

Recommended Posts

This was Christmas Day - I bought a Prime Rib Roast at Publican Quality Meats in Chicago - 65 day aged.  Fantastic.  The carving on the finished product was the result of too much red wine....and people getting aggresive about eating.....it was fabulous but almost too rich - I hate to say it, but I preferred the Chuck Roast....Also cooked via ChefSteps sous vide recipe.

IMG_0153.JPG

IMG_0154.JPG

IMG_0190.JPG


Edited by Unpopular Poet (log)
  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Easter Bank Holiday Monday Roast.

For Easter it should be lamb, but I already cooked roast lamb for the same family members last week on holiday. Hence, this:

DSC02112.thumb.JPG.61f1969e24f4042f6b39eb4f4251d3d1.JPG

Pork loin. I always have trouble with the crackling so I cheated on one. The joint on the right was brushed with gin before rubbing with salt and pepper, the other was rubbed with S+P without other prep. The gin washed joint had a crisp crackling but it was rather flat. This is a failsafe for crackling, but it never turns out excellent. The other joint actually yielded perfect crackling this time- rather unsatisfactorily for me as I don't know what I did right this time. Anyway, it was much appreciated by my father in law and my 12 year old.

DSC02098.thumb.JPG.06e820a962245effc1d324249bd7f2e1.JPG

Beet foliageDSC02099.thumb.JPG.336cb18dcf1ce9761490ead79f436017.JPG

Beets.

DSC02116.thumb.JPG.b24252ca7f9964cec5137e8abf8e39c2.JPG

Meat and potatoes with two veg. This is England.

Bit of Europe sneaking in as a small glug of truffle oil in the mash.

DSC02106.thumb.JPG.ee499acfa25d9f04ea9e0f53c7d3f28c.JPGDSC02133.thumb.JPG.d0ee0dd1ed1a973ef20593ef6a5fb392.JPGDSC02138.thumb.JPG.1fc50b4f1f99d170119c6500b31583a9.JPG

Tarte Tatin to finish. I don't like pudding, so I'm not good with dessert.This one is hugely popular, and an easy win!

 

 

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For your crackling:  I always dry mine in the fridge for a full day after rubbing with salt and rubbing with vodka/gin.  Important for it to be dry.  The other option is if it doesn't get as crispy as you like during the meat roasting, you could cut it off and put it back in at a higher temperature or even under the broiler to be watched like a hawk so it doesn't burn.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/26/2016 at 9:38 AM, David Ross said:

c03a08a16ed7a958f4351c8a3f341565.jpg

A gargantuan haunch of beef for Christmas dinner, ca. 1957

 

As a child in the late 1950's, our Holiday table was graced with turkey at Thanksgiving.....and another turkey at Christmas.  It wasn't until the 1970's that my Father finally made good on his Christmas promise to "give us a Christmas Goose" by actually cooking one.  To this day, I remember how little meat there was and it was dark, tough and chewy.  We had indeed been given a Christmas Goose!  Yet in later years Father (who always coated the meat with some type of rub), and Mother (who cooked the roast), redeemed themselves and cooked regal prime ribs of beef for Christmas dinner.

 

The Holiday roast, (as my UK friend Helen calls it), is a thing of beauty and an adventure for cooks around the globe.  And while turkey and prime rib still reign supreme, I for one like to venture to the farm and forest to procure other delights for the Holiday roast.  Right now I have duck (which will be slow-roasted and served with prized wild huckleberries) and a leg of lamb in the freezer, but I'll be adding some wild Scottish grouse, wood pigeon and a fresh American ham to the larder for roasts throughout the Holiday season. 

 

Please join me in celebrating the Holiday roast with a special eG Cook-Off.  We place no boundaries or regulations on your cookery.  Whether it's sous vide, stuffed, smoked, barbecued or braised, roasted, grilled, broiled, fried or flamed, all manner of cooking techniques are welcome into the discussion and feast. 

 

See our complete Cook-Off Index here:

https://forums.egullet.org/topic/143994-egullet-recipe-cook-off-index/

 

It's the season to return to one of our favorite Cook-Off's, eG Cook-Off #74: Holiday Roasts.  Are you sticking with your traditional standards this year?  Turkey, Ham and Roast Beef?  Venturing into a crown roast of lamb or pork?  What about a wild game roast, or a whole fresh salmon roast?  A lobster roast for New Years?  Let's look back on what we were cooking in 2016 and what we plan, and cook, this Holiday season.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/17/2017 at 1:30 PM, Unpopular Poet said:

This was Christmas Day - I bought a Prime Rib Roast at Publican Quality Meats in Chicago - 65 day aged.  Fantastic.  The carving on the finished product was the result of too much red wine....and people getting aggresive about eating.....it was fabulous but almost too rich -

IMG_0153.JPG

IMG_0154.JPG

IMG_0190.JPG

 

 

This was our experience some 5 years ago.    Family unanimously rejected the "prime" grade standing rib beef roast as too rich to be enjoyable.    The following year, I switched to "choice" grade, but it still was too unctuous.    Since then, rather than patronize our excellent custom butcher, I go to Lucky supermarket and buy their holiday special standing rib roast, usually only around $5.99 a pound.    I dry marinate it in salt, pepper, olive oil, garlic, thyme, EVOO overnight and bring to room temperature for several hours before roasting, LOW AND SLOW, 275F for some 5 hours until internal temp of 125F, resting for 20 minute.    The result is a tender, robustly flavored, digestible roast.    Happy Campers, and many $$ saved.   

  • Like 3

eGullet member #80.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/26/2019 at 7:16 AM, Margaret Pilgrim said:

 

This was our experience some 5 years ago.    Family unanimously rejected the "prime" grade standing rib beef roast as too rich to be enjoyable.    The following year, I switched to "choice" grade, but it still was too unctuous.    Since then, rather than patronize our excellent custom butcher, I go to Lucky supermarket and buy their holiday special standing rib roast, usually only around $5.99 a pound.    I dry marinate it in salt, pepper, olive oil, garlic, thyme, EVOO overnight and bring to room temperature for several hours before roasting, LOW AND SLOW, 275F for some 5 hours until internal temp of 125F, resting for 20 minute.    The result is a tender, robustly flavored, digestible roast.    Happy Campers, and many $$ saved.   

Oh yeah.  That's a great way to cook a roast.  I use this also.  I put some little smashed potatoes in the air fryer to go with....toss them in some beef fat first.😁

  • Like 1
  • Delicious 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎10‎/‎26‎/‎2019 at 10:16 AM, Margaret Pilgrim said:

 

This was our experience some 5 years ago.    Family unanimously rejected the "prime" grade standing rib beef roast as too rich to be enjoyable.    The following year, I switched to "choice" grade, but it still was too unctuous.    Since then, rather than patronize our excellent custom butcher, I go to Lucky supermarket and buy their holiday special standing rib roast, usually only around $5.99 a pound.    I dry marinate it in salt, pepper, olive oil, garlic, thyme, EVOO overnight and bring to room temperature for several hours before roasting, LOW AND SLOW, 275F for some 5 hours until internal temp of 125F, resting for 20 minute.    The result is a tender, robustly flavored, digestible roast.    Happy Campers, and many $$ saved.   

Interesting.   As this year I was thinking of splurging for one of those "prime" aged Prime Rib Roasts.   Now you have given me pause for the cause.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yesterday I came across a prime rib roast recipe I've tried in the past.  In a 550 oven for 20 minutes, then turn off the oven.  Leave the roast in and let it cook in the oven as it cools, 18 min per lb for medium rare.  I've tried it but honestly don't remember how successful it was.  My initial thought now is that it wouldn't give me the char, caramelized fatty crust I like.  Anyone else try this?  Would it work for a leg of lamb?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Owtahear said:

Interesting.   As this year I was thinking of splurging for one of those "prime" aged Prime Rib Roasts.   Now you have given me pause for the cause.

 

It is strictly dependent on your (family's) taste and tolerance for rich meat.    Both the prime and choice  grades roasts were excellent, just not to my group's taste and digestion.  


Edited by Margaret Pilgrim (log)

eGullet member #80.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, David Ross said:

Yesterday I came across a prime rib roast recipe I've tried in the past.  In a 550 oven for 20 minutes, then turn off the oven.  Leave the roast in and let it cook in the oven as it cools, 18 min per lb for medium rare.  I've tried it but honestly don't remember how successful it was.  My initial thought now is that it wouldn't give me the char, caramelized fatty crust I like.  Anyone else try this?  Would it work for a leg of lamb?

I've made Martha Stewart's Prime Rib. She starts at 450 to give it the crispy crust and then turns the temp down to 350 for the rest of the time in the oven.

It's that first 20 minutes that give it the crunchy crust. As long as you don't tent it with foil, the crust should stay crunchy. Never made leg of lamb so I can't tell you if your method in question would work.

  • Like 2

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've splurged on a prime grade prime rib roast once or twice. It's been fatty but good, and not too rich for our tastes. The Choice grade prime ribs have been less reliably good: sometimes tough, or not marbled properly.

 

I favor the fast-roast treatment: rub it with a spice mix (abetted by a coating of olive oil), then sear in the hottest pan I can get, then load into a 450F oven, uncovered. I pull it out at 110 - 115F internal temperature, usually at less than an hour's cooking time. I must admit that I've had prime rib that wasn't pink at all but was butter-knife tender and quite delicious, but when I cook it myself I prefer to have some rare meat in it.

 

Here's a decent photo from a few Thanksgivings ago. It was a bit rarer than we like in the very heart of the roast (I had pulled it out at 110F that time) but since there were only 2 of us I was able to reheat the leftovers later without overcooking them.

 

post-17034-0-16796200-1449168711_thumb (1).jpg

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1
  • Delicious 1

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/1/2019 at 7:08 AM, David Ross said:

Yesterday I came across a prime rib roast recipe I've tried in the past.  In a 550 oven for 20 minutes, then turn off the oven.  Leave the roast in and let it cook in the oven as it cools, 18 min per lb for medium rare.  I've tried it but honestly don't remember how successful it was.  My initial thought now is that it wouldn't give me the char, caramelized fatty crust I like.  Anyone else try this?  Would it work for a leg of lamb?

I've done something similar.  It's a terrifying thing to do to an expensive cut of meat.  As a matter of fact, I named the recipe "Scary Prime Rib" on my recipe webpage😄.  The directions on my recipe say:

 

Make sure that your stove is fairly clean.
Preheat oven to 500 degrees. Turn on your fan and open all your windows.
Put the prime rib into an uncovered roasting pan on a rack.
Put it in the oven. Cook for 4 minutes per pound for rare, 5 minutes per pound for medium rare and 6 minutes per pound for medium. Then TURN OFF THE OVEN & DO NOT OPEN for 2 hours.

 

My notes say, "It was perfect.  Juicy, perfectly cooked and delicious!"  No idea if it would work for leg of lamb.  It would be worth a try, though.  

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I made a prime rib a few weeks ago (with fondant potatoes and creamed spinach *sigh*) - it was around 8lbs ... I’ve always used the “low and slow” method then broil about 3-4 minutes after rest for a nice crust ... pink edge to edge - was wonderful according to Mr Cat and Cat Son ... works every time ... I rub it lovingly and talk to it before I put it in the oven - I think that’s the key 😁

  • Like 2
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...