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Porthos

A Yukon Gold Potato Question

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My daughter (mid-thirties and cooks well) asked for Yukon Gold potatoes for the mashed potatoes for our U.S. Thanksgiving meal. I have found Yukon Gold potatoes in the past but now all I have found in the couple of markets I checked in are "gold" potatoes. Is this a trademark name that growers and vendors are trying to get around? Something else? Any insights would be helpful.

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I don't know whether Yukon Gold is a specific breed or a trademark, but I've had much the same results from other 'midway' yellowish potatoes.  Offhand the only breed I can think of is Klondike Gold. (Sounds like 'Pyrex' vs. 'Fire King', doesn't it?)  I call it 'midway' because it's midway between the waxy end (red potatoes) and the starchy end (russets).

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There are dozens of named yellow (gold) potato varieties — and who knows how many unnamed commercial crosses.

Yukon Gold just happens to be a named variety that's well known.

So, I think they're taking advantage of Yukon Gold's notoriety and using "Gold" rather than yellow or the variety name — neither of which would draw much attention.

I've seen them do the same thing here.

 


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)
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At this time of year, lots of russets get shipped to stores. It's as if the big market buyers don't think anyone eats anything BUT russets. In past years I have had trouble finding red potatoes at this time of year. The only consolation being that the russets get deeply discounted after Thanksgiving. Last year, I got ten pound bags of russets at Kroger for 50¢.

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Same around here.  none of the potatoes are labeled 'Yukon Gold', just yellow, or gold.

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Plain old gold works fine. Different from russets, closer to a red potato, but not like that, either. My potato of choice unless I'm making latkes, and if I think of it, I'll get russets for that.

 

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I believe Yukon Gold is a trademarked name. Similar potatoes can be called gold.

 

Random commen. Because I tend to be a rustic cook I prefer red potatoes for mashed potatoes and I don't peel them.  Similarly,  I almost never peel carrots either. 

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1 hour ago, CanadianHomeChef said:

Is there a difference? I cannot for the life of me find Yukon Gold in Calgary :(

 

 

You are a bit too far south and east.

 

That was a joke.  Yukon Gold actually originated in Ontario.  I am more into russets myself.

 

 

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Potatoes labeled just "white" (or "all-purpose," though you don't see this label in consumer locations much anymore) work pretty much the same as gold potatoes -- they're medium in starch, and have pretty thin skins. (Unless you're armed with a double-blind study, please don't tell me that gold potatoes have a buttery taste.)

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8 minutes ago, Porthos said:

I believe Yukon Gold is a trademarked name. Similar potatoes can be called gold.

 

I'm not positive but I don't believe the name Yukon Gold is trademarked.  Yukon Gold is a specific variety however.

 

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To me they are more dense than a red.  Russets are the norm (fluffy baker kind of 'taters) here but the Yukon Gold is preferred in some appplications. Melissa's is the star of the produce show here and yes there are some trudemarks but I would not get hung up the exact variety  https://www.melissas.com/category-s/1855.htm?searching=Y&sort=7&cat=1855&show=15&page=2


Edited by heidih (log)
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Gold pots are my standard. They mash well (Heston prefers them)...gratin well...and pan fry well.   I find russets too mealy/starchy for much other than a baked potato.  

 

For potato salad I’ll use red or gold pots. I think reds stay firmer which is a virtue in pot salad. Sometimes I’ll boil with a little vinegar to firm up the pectin. 

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10 hours ago, gfweb said:

Gold pots are my standard. They mash well (Heston prefers them)...gratin well...and pan fry well.   I find russets too mealy/starchy for much other than a baked potato.  

 

For potato salad I’ll use red or gold pots. I think reds stay firmer which is a virtue in pot salad. Sometimes I’ll boil with a little vinegar to firm up the pectin. 

I actually sometimes enjoy using russets for potato salad; I like the creaminess they bring. Depends what type of potato salad I'm looking to make.

 

I'm pretty sure it's how older generations always made potato salad, as it was the one potato one could find.  Then I read this piece (which is behind a bit of a wall), tried them, and really liked the way the potato salad came out.


Edited by weinoo (log)
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1 hour ago, weinoo said:

I actually sometimes enjoy using russets for potato salad; I like the creaminess they bring. Depends what type of potato salad I'm looking to make.

 

I'm pretty sure it's how older generations always made potato salad, as it was the one potato one could find.  Then I read this piece (which is behind a bit of a wall), tried them, and really liked the way the potato salad came out.

 

 

Good point.

I also like russets for latkes.

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I think for latkes there is really no better potato than an Idaho russet.

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i think ' gold ' simply increases the price of the potato.

 

and certainly there is no butter taste what so ever , even though a few TV chefs have suggested this .

 

Idiots.

 

I use red bliss for a waxy potato:  potato salad  , hand smashed potatoes.  use a mixer and you get glue

 

Russets for Crusty Baked , and mashed w mixer.  I leave the skin on both after cleaning a bit

 

I think the skin adds flavor. Ive also used them for PS and its true they disintegrate a bit

 

but that's nice for a ' tart ' German style PS

 

I have done ' cut-baked '  red bliss in the CSO until nicely browned 

 

they are fine.


Edited by rotuts (log)
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