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mebinsf

New to working with gianduja-questions.

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4 hours ago, Rajala said:

 

Hmm. Yeah, but... I wonder why you would do it twice though? If my praliné already is super smooth. I mean, the chocolate should be pretty smooth already as well. 

 

I agree, skip a step by grinding your nuts & sugar smooth, add purchased chocolate and temper only once.

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7 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

But it’s not  praline at the first tempering step - it’s whole nuts in chocolate as I read it.



 

That's my fault, I didn't write _everything_. It includes the whole roast and mix with sugar part. Maybe it makes more sense for my questions when you know this? :)

 

3 hours ago, pastrygirl said:

 

I agree, skip a step by grinding your nuts & sugar smooth, add purchased chocolate and temper only once.

 

I think I'll go with that.

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15 hours ago, Rajala said:

1. Roast nuts, mix with sugar

2. Mix with melted chocolate and add cocoa butter, temper at 28°

3. Pour onto tray and allow to crystallize.

4. Pass through the grinder

5. Temper once more at 28°

 

He mentions that you need to use a grinder or a "ball bearing refiner" to achieve maximum level of smoothness. I guess that if you run it through a melanger at the beginning to make the praliné, you really wouldn't need to temper twice, or what do  you guys say? I've never tempered a gianduja before, what's the idea here? Make sure that it's heated to 45 degrees and just table it till 28 degrees? Or are there more steps?

 

 

(this seems like the usual case where the text is written by a ghost writer who's not practical with pastry making)

 

Tempering at step 2 seems like overkill, it has not much sense since when you pass the mixture in the grinder at step 4 you are going to heat it and melt the chocolate / cocoa butter. So it doesn't change is it was in temper or not. I would omit that tempering passage.

I'm pretty sure that with "grinder" he means a professional chocolate grinder with granite stone wheels, the big version of the small machine you use and call "melanger". Don't really think he means a grinder with blades.

 

If you temper the gianduja with the tabling method then you need to go to lower temperatures, around 24° C. The reason is similar to why you use lower temperatures to temper milk and white chocolate: the added fats interfere with the cocoa butter crystalization. If you are pratical with the tabling method (meaning that you don't need a thermometer to check it, you just "feel" if it's in temper) then trust your feelings for tempering the gianduja too, the difference between tempered and untempered is the same.

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Teo

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On 7/26/2018 at 4:13 PM, Jim D. said:

I didn't know where else to post this question. I have made almond gianduja many times and have always ground the nuts in the food processor with success--they liquefy in a fairly short time. But this last time they did not. After so long that I worried about my Cuisinart, I added some unflavored oil; it took quite a lot of it, but the almonds finally liquefied (more or less). Unfortunately some of their flavor is gone, and I want a paste tasting strongly of almond. I have some good French almond flavoring, but of course that is mixing water with the fat of gianduja. So I began looking online for almond oil.

Just wanted to update the above information with what I found subsequently. Eventually I located an almond oil meant for flavoring (as opposed to salad dressing):  Dr. Oetker's bitter almond oil. It is available in various places, including Amazon. It's a German product made with natural flavorings, is very concentrated, and is bottled so that it comes out in droplets. It is delicious and made my bland almond gianduja very flavorful.

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