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Searzall--After the Honeymoon?


boilsover
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Hi, All:

 

  OK, I succeeded in resisting the initial paroxysm of enthusiasm for this, but I am wondering how it is playing in Poughkeepsie?  Does it have legs?  Or is it a Modernist flash-in-the-pan?  Worth a Franklin in 2017?

 

Thanks!

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8 minutes ago, Chris Hennes said:

I still use mine on a regular basis. Mostly to melt cheese, or finish off things that didn't brown evenly, etc. Hard do say what it's worth, it's a sunk cost now!

 

Thanks.  Is it completely without "torch taste"?  I mean, I already have 3 torches I use for all manner of things.  Do you feel complete with that heat-diffusing head?  Is it more sliced bread or a fad IYO?

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It is the best thing in my kitchen for melting cheese. That's mostly what I use it for. I also use it to touch up the top of fried eggs. I'd use it for post-SV work more if I didn't have a grill. But even on the grill, I'll often sear the top with the Searzall while the bottom is grilling, flip the steak/whatever, then sear the new topside with the Searzall. I love my grill, but it doesn't get nearly hot enough to put a good crust on a fresh-from-the-bath SV steak. (It's a Weber Genesis E330, and it gets plenty hot... I can push it to near 700. But it's no match for a grate directly on top of charcoal.) I like having the Searzall. Like I said, it's the king for getting cheese nice and bubbly; that alone is almost worth the cost of admission. If you already have a torch (or 3) and are looking for a new gadget, the Searzall is a great choice. I never liked using my "naked" TS8000 on steaks (or my low-powered Rosle kitchen torch) but I'm much more torch-happy with the Searzall in hand. I don't know that it's a "must have" for most people, but if you love torches, it's a must have.

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50 minutes ago, boilsover said:

 

Thanks.  Is it completely without "torch taste"?  I mean, I already have 3 torches I use for all manner of things.  Do you feel complete with that heat-diffusing head?  Is it more sliced bread or a fad IYO?

Once I got the Searzall I completely stopped using a torch without it. Not only does it eliminate torch taste completely (to my palate anyway) but it also spreads the heat out a bit, giving a bit of forgiveness. I can't imagine using a naked torch the way I use one with the Searzall on it. It's sort of fun to make s'mores with, too.

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Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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12 hours ago, Chris Hennes said:

Once I got the Searzall I completely stopped using a torch without it. Not only does it eliminate torch taste completely (to my palate anyway) but it also spreads the heat out a bit, giving a bit of forgiveness. I can't imagine using a naked torch the way I use one with the Searzall on it. It's sort of fun to make s'mores with, too.

 

OK, final question:  Have you had to replace the screen?  I read somewhere that some people had problems with this.  Thanks.

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I've gone through 4 tanks of gas, and am approaching the time to swap out the screens...  I use mine in a bit of a backwards fashion... I pull a steak or a piece of salmon out of the freezer, season and sear, then worry about getting the middle up to temperature... can't think of a better way to get nice brown sear on the outside of  a piece of salmon and make the interior that perfect 110F. 

Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

Learn to brew beer with my eGCI course

Chris Holst, Attorney-at-Lunch

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I have a Searzall which I use about twice a week, mainly for putting a crust on beef or lamb. I like it for small jobs but it can be a pain for large jobs. My main problem is that I live in Australia. I cannot buy replacement screens here. Amazon will sell me a Searzall and a Bernzomatic TS-8000 but not replacement screens (they don't ship replacement screens to Australia). I sought assistance on the Searzall forum but that forum is dead: Searzall forum

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4 hours ago, boilsover said:

 

OK, final question:  Have you had to replace the screen?  I read somewhere that some people had problems with this.  Thanks.

I have not replaced the screen, though I'd expect I will need to before too much longer. I've gone through five propane tanks since I got mine.

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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On 11/7/2016 at 11:48 PM, btbyrd said:

If you already have a torch (or 3) and are looking for a new gadget, the Searzall is a great choice.

 

I was dissuaded by Dave Arnold's strong recommendation that you only use the Searzall with the most powerful torch heads. I checked and saw that my Bernzomatic head is at best second-tier ... substantially wussier than the one they suggest. 

 

How important do you think this is? I'd be more tempted if I didn't have to add the price of a top-of-the-line torch head.

Notes from the underbelly

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  • 1 month later...

Has anybody here successfully swapped out screens?  It's that time, and mine is putting up quite a fight.  One of the 4 philips-head screws that holds the screen retaining ring in place has stripped such that the screwdriver can't move it.  And it seems the ring itself has gotten pretty stuck in place.  Right now the whole unit is sitting on the drill press, having been given a good dousing with PB Blaster to try to break things loose.  Anybody have ideas to try before just drilling out the dead screw?

Edited by cdh (log)

Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

Learn to brew beer with my eGCI course

Chris Holst, Attorney-at-Lunch

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Drilling out the screw will certainly allow you to remove the screen, but unless you can figure another way of securing the new one in place you will have to re-tap the hole for a new screw. I have had luck in the past by using a pair of "vice-grips" to grab hold of the screw head. If you get all that done, I would suggest replacing the philips head screws with small bolts with a hex head - it'll be easier next time.

 

p

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Another idea is to heat up the Searzall before trying to remove the screw.  If the hole gets hotter than the screw, it will expand more and make screw removal easier.... you may not have to get it ridiculously hot though...

 

I think the vice grip idea is a good one, other than drilling a pilot hole into the screw and using an E-Z Out....  I also like the idea of replacing the philips head screw - I haven't seen it, but if the screw is small, another option if you can't find a small hex head screw is to use one with a socket head...  Also, I would coat the screw with a high temperature anti-seize lubricant that will aid in removal later.

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16 hours ago, cdh said:

Has anybody here successfully swapped out screens?  It's that time, and mine is putting up quite a fight.  One of the 4 philips-head screws that holds the screen retaining ring in place has stripped such that the screwdriver can't move it.  And it seems the ring itself has gotten pretty stuck in place.  Right now the whole unit is sitting on the drill press, having been given a good dousing with PB Blaster to try to break things loose.  Anybody have ideas to try before just drilling out the dead screw?

 

 

Mechanics use impact wrench to loosen stuck nuts and screws.

You can try using a hammer drill to drive out the stuck screws.

Or use this tool, a tool that is designed for stuck screws:

https://www.ecstuning.com/b-schwaben-parts/impact-screwdriver-kit-6-pieces/pcs2800/?gclid=CLj7zdrt8tACFUpMDQodn7IJKQ

 

dcarch

 

 

Edited by dcarch (log)
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18 hours ago, palo said:

Drilling out the screw will certainly allow you to remove the screen, but unless you can figure another way of securing the new one in place you will have to re-tap the hole for a new screw. I have had luck in the past by using a pair of "vice-grips" to grab hold of the screw head. If you get all that done, I would suggest replacing the philips head screws with small bolts with a hex head - it'll be easier next time.

 

p

My vote is for a ViseGrip on the screw head and then heat the area.  Should turn out.

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Visegrips didn't do it.  Any more thoughts before the tungsten drill bits come out?  If I had a dremel with a rotary hacksaw blade, I might be able to cut a channel for a flat screwdriver... but I don't have that handy.

Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

Learn to brew beer with my eGCI course

Chris Holst, Attorney-at-Lunch

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