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Look back in hunger: Reykjavik


BonVivant
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Thank you, @Duvel. It was an easy flight from Brussels. Reykjavik is extremely touristy. Guess it's not expensive enough. Beer prices are on par with Norway (which is the most expensive country in the world, besides Singapore). Seafood is so good in Iceland, obviously. The fermented shark is no big deal, despite all the fuss people make about it. Yes, you get a huge whiff of amonia but that's what the booze is for. But if I have to smell something strong I'd rather eat all the stinky cheeses from France. The stinkier the better (cheese that is)!

 

(And I meant to lose your abs in 5 days. Could not edit anymore)

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Oh, no! They EAT those cute little puffins? I'm horrified!

 

But Iceland is lovely, at least via your photos. And the prevalence of langoustine soup and other preparations of those little beauties leave me salivating...

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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We were in Reykjavik a couple of Februarys ago and, by lucky chance, our visit coincided with the annual Food and Fun festival, during which the chefs of most of the better restaurants (of which there are a good number) pair up with chefs from Europe and North America and perhaps elsewhere to create special set-price menus using Icelandic ingredients.  The most difficult challenge was deciding which of 25 or 30 menus sounded the most intriguing.  No problem with the abs, though.  They haven't been seen in years.

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  • 5 years later...

@BonVivantWe'll be heading to southern Iceland for about 10 days soon (postponed from summer 2020).  Do you have any specific restaurant recommendations?  We'll be spending 3 nights near Selfoss, 3 nights near Hofn, 3 nights near Hof and 1 night in Reykjavik.  Obviously we're going to try to eat as much langoustine as we can afford when in Hofn (it's like the langoustine capital of Iceland).  Most of the days we'll be off hiking and will probably bring trail snacks with us for lunches - did you see things that would do well with little or no refrigeration for several hours?  Dinners will be in restaurants in the above areas.  Thanks!

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I had the opportunity to work with Gunnar Karl Gíslason a number of years ago, at a Nordic food festival here in NYC.

 

Of course when his book came out, it was on my list...and purchased.  NORTH (eG-friendly Amazon.com link)

 

Meet The Chef Behind The Best Food In All Of Iceland

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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1 hour ago, weinoo said:

I had the opportunity to work with Gunnar Karl Gíslason a number of years ago, at a Nordic food festival here in NYC.

 

Of course when his book came out, it was on my list...and purchased.  NORTH (eG-friendly Amazon.com link)

 

Meet The Chef Behind The Best Food In All Of Iceland

Thanks.  Interesting article.  There are no reservations at Dill available in 1 week's notice, plus, I don't really know if we want a whole tasting menu thing - part of me is kind of over that.  I checked out the menu at Tides but, I dont' know, let's just say it didn't inspire me to rush to make a reservation.

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I have another friend presently in Iceland - she's a horsewoman.

 

If you get a chance...

 

image.thumb.png.c131b121e3bd0868c093c1668609c210.png

 

Ride an Icelandic - she says they are the smoothest horses she has ever ridden.

 

They also like to, after a morning ride, roll around in the dirt and grass...

 

image.thumb.png.bd55c93d7e3aa11cabbecc5f58461ae6.png

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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Brilliant! The missus wants to see the northern lights, and I'm mulling the options. The cuisine looks interesting, could be good.

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I stayed in Hofn for the Northern Lights a few years ago.  Ate a lot of Icelandic lobster, caribou, and pylsa.   Had  an  unfortunate encounter with Lysi at a breakfast buffet. In my defense, it was served in a shot glass, so I thought liqueur at breakfast was a reasonable thing, it was not liqueur :S.   Iceland also is a black licorice lovers paradise.   Brennivin is an acquired tasted, I actually liked it and keep a bottle of aquavit in the freezer now.

 

Iceland looks and feels like another planet than Earth, the iceberg lagoon and black sand beach were right out of a sci fi novel.

 

 

 

I did not mess with the rotten shark or the sheepshead in the Viking tourist restaurants.

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@KennethT, Sorry, not much help for your trip re restaurant recs. It seems so long ago... I was in the capital for 5 days and only ate in restaurants a couple of times, I think. Had an apartment and wanted to buy local lamb and "exotic" (to us) meats, also seafood to cook and eat in the apartment. 

 

For sure you must try the lamb. I ate it in Japan the first time and went to Reykjavik the following year. Langoustines and prawns, too, of course. Don't have to try fermented shark and hot dog, really. (I did anyway). Whatever you eat it'll be nice. Enjoy your trip. One of the most incredible countries.

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I forgot, I also had Hangikjöt, which is a kind of smoked lamb meat.  I don't really like lamb, but this was pretty good and unusual.  Very thinly sliced.   

 

Gull and Thule beer were pretty nice, on the lighter side.  

 

I also remember there were a lot of open faced sandwiches, the Danish influence.  I love those.

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