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Shelby

An Overload of Eggs

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Here is a recipe for pickled bologna that's very close to what I grew up eating. I would add several cloves of peeled garlic. For two pounds of bologna, I'd use a dozen eggs. That ought to make about a gallon.

 

I remember the little country store up the road from where i grew up always had a gallon jar of bologna and eggs atop the meat case. Lunch at the store consisted of either a slab of "rag bologna" on a big cracker, dotted with hot sauce; bologna and eggs with a handful of crackers, or a regular bologna sandwich (or some of the other meats in the case) on white bread. Or a can or two of Vienna sausages. You could customize your lunch with chips, candy or other sweets for dessert, or even a piece of fruit, along with a Coke out of the cooler. Had several of those lunches in my day.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

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7 minutes ago, kayb said:

Here is a recipe for pickled bologna that's very close to what I grew up eating. I would add several cloves of peeled garlic. For two pounds of bologna, I'd use a dozen eggs. That ought to make about a gallon.

 

I remember the little country store up the road from where i grew up always had a gallon jar of bologna and eggs atop the meat case. Lunch at the store consisted of either a slab of "rag bologna" on a big cracker, dotted with hot sauce; bologna and eggs with a handful of crackers, or a regular bologna sandwich (or some of the other meats in the case) on white bread. Or a can or two of Vienna sausages. You could customize your lunch with chips, candy or other sweets for dessert, or even a piece of fruit, along with a Coke out of the cooler. Had several of those lunches in my day.

I have to say this is completely new to me.  Don't think I would make it myself but I would certainly love to give it a taste.   Always makes my day when I discovered something new.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

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11 hours ago, Thanks for the Crepes said:

I have seen "century" eggs at S-Mart, but been afraid of them. If you've tried them, how do they taste?

 

It's the idea and the looks of it that put you off. I first ate a "century egg" in a pastry when I was a kid. I didn't know what it was. I just ate it, and I liked it. The yolk tastes like a sweet jelly. But the white is blah, forget that.

 

 

 

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4 hours ago, Shelby said:

I LOVE pickled eggs!  The preserving thread has a couple of pictures of jars I've done.  Do you have a recipe to share with me? :) 

 

How about pickled eggs and beets? I've made this recipe and liked it.

http://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Pickled-Beets-and-Hard-Cooked-Eggs

 

I noticed your piles of zucchini on the Gardening thread. Zucchini frittata is a good combo.

 

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11 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

However, I remain convinced that, in a true blind tasting, few people would know that they were eating anything other than a hard boiled egg. They may notice that they are slightly firmer, but without being rubbery and that the taste is a bit more intense than a regular egg, but not ridiculously so. I have described them in the past as "exaggerated eggs".

 

There's no way I could imagine the average person could not 100% reliably tell a century egg from a regular egg in a blind tasting. The intense sulfurous aroma and taste are a hallmark of century eggs and is extremely obvious. 

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PS: I am a guy.

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13 hours ago, Shalmanese said:

The intense sulfurous aroma and taste

 

Sounds like you got bad century eggs.

 

I've done blind tastings several times. Few people know.

 

I've been eating "century eggs" for about a quarter of a century - about once a week or every two weeks. I have never had any that were "sulfurous“, intense or otherwise,  in either aroma or taste, and I certainly wouldn't eat them if they were.


Edited by liuzhou (log)
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1 hour ago, liuzhou said:

 

Sounds like you got bad century eggs.

 

I've done blind tastings several times. Few people know.

 

Agree. I've only eaten century eggs a few times, but I have pleasant memories. No way I'd eat something that reminded me of spoiled eggs.

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8 hours ago, GlorifiedRice said:

Thank you! New to me. I love the yolks in joongzi and now, I won't be wondering what to do with all the whites from salting whole eggs!

 

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Dejah

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Early last year my egg man brought me a lot of eggs and shortly afterward I learned I was going to go for open heart surgery and would be away for about two months.

I separated the yolks from the whites, put them in Cambro containers that seal tightly and froze them.

 

When I was catering, I used to buy frozen eggs all the time and never had a problem with using them.  There are numerous sites on the internet that tell you how to do it if you are worried.  You can freeze whole eggs but I found it easier to separate them.  MAKE SURE NOT EVEN A SPECK OF YOLK GETS IN WITH THE WHITES.

 

They keep for months.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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22 hours ago, GlorifiedRice said:

<video>

 

This was cool, and I really liked the way she separated the yolks.


Regina

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37 minutes ago, Regina3000 said:

 

This was cool, and I really liked the way she separated the yolks.

 

Regina go check out the rest of Van's recipes. CUTE sons and fabulous recipes.

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Wawa Sizzli FTW!

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On 04/11/2016 at 2:18 PM, Shelby said:

I LOVE pickled eggs!  The preserving thread has a couple of pictures of jars I've done.  Do you have a recipe to share with me? :) 

 

@Shelby

 

Well Shelby, not so much a receipt, more a procedure.

I love pickled red cabbage, so after eating it, i hard boiled some eggs and popped them in to the pickling vinegare that was left. I only did 4 eggs, and when my pickled oinions are eaten , i will repeat.... geddit repeat.

 

IMG_3991.jpg

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Martial.2,500 Years ago:

If pale beans bubble for you in a red earthenware pot, you can often decline the dinners of sumptuous hosts.

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2 minutes ago, naguere said:

 

@Shelby

 

Well Shelby, not so much a receipt, more a procedure.

I love pickled red cabbage, so after eating it, i hard boiled some eggs and popped them in to the pickling vinegare that was left. I only did 4 eggs, and when my pickled oinions are eaten , i will repeat.... geddit repeat.

 

IMG_3991.jpg

I love the color :) 

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On 11/3/2016 at 4:01 AM, shain said:

You can make shakshuka , small fresh eggs are best for it. 

You can also freeze separated eggs to bake with later. Just make sure their size will suit the recipe. 

 

Yeah, forgot about the Shakshuka.....here is one I made earlier in the year. (Did I post it before?)

 

 

 

 

 

 

_MG_3313_zps9k24fef9.jpg

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