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Darienne

How long will this pie last?

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Darienne   

Yesterday I made my familiar go-to simple lime/cream cheese pie with one egg, some milk, lime juice & zest, etc, covered with a dark chocolate ganache: heavy cream, a dollop of butter.  It's in the fridge covered with a plastic topper but I can cover it with plastic wrap or aluminum foil.

Today's lunch guest is not coming...onslaught of sleet, freezing rain, and now snow...oh goodie...winter's here...  Now she is slated for next Thursday.  Is there any possibility that the pie can last that long and not poison or at least revolt us?

Thanks.

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Yiannos   

Not sure what the texture will be like afterwards, but can you wrap it well and then freeze it for a week? I just can't imagine that long in the fridge for most any freshly prepared pastry, but I am not an expert so hopefully someone with more experience will chime in.

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liuzhou   

Eat it and and make another next week. You know you want to. :D

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KennethT   

I find that cooked things, in general, in my refrigerator (which is kept very cold - just above freezing) last a week - no spoilage issues until after that - and even then sometimes it's a few days over a week.  But, for every degree warmer, bacterial growth increases by a lot more, so I think it really depends on your refrigerator.  Another issue - does the pie have a crust?  It doesn't seem so, based on the ingredients - but if it did, I'm sure the crust integrity/quality would be much more problematic than spoilage issues!

 

I have no experience with freezing custards (other than ice cream, but that's different) - so I don't know if it would make it grainy or separate upon thawing...

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I agree with liuzhou. Eat it and make a fresh one next week. It may not be unsafe to eat, but it will be a week old pie from the fridge.

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Darienne   

That's two for eating the pie.  Truth be told...we did eat some at lunch and will probably eat the entire thing over the weekend.  It's a very unusual cheese dessert in that the ingredients are only slightly rich.  One package of cream cheese only, one egg, part of a cup of milk, a little sugar, a smidgen of butter...hardly worth fretting over.  And think of the anti-oxidants in that dark chocolate topping.  Sold to the woman who has deluded herself once more.  :PxD

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Beebs   

+1 for eating it!

 

But, more importantly, care to share the recipe? It sounds delicious and I've a couple potlucks coming up!

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Tri2Cook   

I'm glad someone already suggested eating it because my reply to "How long will this pie last?" was going  to be "until you eat it all". :P

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Yeah, I'd personally give the pie a 5 day shelf life with a caveat that the crust probably won't be great after a couple days. Be safe, make another one later.

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lindag   
18 hours ago, Darienne said:

That's two for eating the pie.  Truth be told...we did eat some at lunch and will probably eat the entire thing over the weekend.  It's a very unusual cheese dessert in that the ingredients are only slightly rich.  One package of cream cheese only, one egg, part of a cup of milk, a little sugar, a smidgen of butter...hardly worth fretting over.  And think of the anti-oxidants in that dark chocolate topping.  Sold to the woman who has deluded herself once more.  :PxD

Sorry about the bad weather ruining your plans.  Sounds like you're getting an early start, ayeh?

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Darienne   

We did eat the pie, the whole pie and nothing but the pie.  And now it's November 3, our guest is here (out viewing the farm with Ed) and the pie is in the fridge awaiting dessert time.  The same lime cheese pie with chocolate ganache topping. 

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