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Yard Sale, Thrift Store, Junk Heap Shopping (Part 3)

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GE hot plate and single burner for 1.50.  It seems to have an option for a low temp to keep things warm.

 

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The pan I mentioned upthread turns out to be a pre-1960 Wagner #8. I have never had the issues I am having with this pan to strip the crud. Way thicker than I have encountered before. 2 hours at 550 or so has not carbonized everything on the outside sidewall.

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IMG_0894.thumb.JPG.56b184d415c7a81a4153ed27bafe1394.JPG

 

 This is enameled cast iron I found in a thrift store. It has no markings on it other than a tiny label saying "made in Japan".  Any guesses as to its purpose?


Edited by Anna N (log)
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Saw this Koolatron item in the Value Village today - about the size of a lunch box - it apparently heats around 300F. Made to heat a meal in the car I expect.

 

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On 8/8/2017 at 0:29 PM, Porthos said:

The pan I mentioned upthread turns out to be a pre-1960 Wagner #8. I have never had the issues I am having with this pan to strip the crud. Way thicker than I have encountered before. 2 hours at 550 or so has not carbonized everything on the outside sidewall.

 

Does your oven have a self cleaning setting? I have taken a couple of mine partially through self cleaning and that worked very well. (placed it on the bottom so as not to risk breaking a rack) There's also the lye followed by vinegar method.

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11 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

Saw this Koolatron item in the Value Village today - about the size of a lunch box - it apparently heats around 300F. Made to heat a meal in the car I expect.

 

IMG_5695.JPG.ffafc3aa8180fe9519a4129d37b47ca2.JPG

 

IMG_5696.JPG.34f33a1e5135d74ed8be64f82a6911e7.JPG

 

Did you buy it?

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1 minute ago, ElsieD said:

 

Did you buy it?

Nope - resisted the temptation - but did stop to get a picture!

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Kooltron that I had years ago could be used to heat or cool - 12v DC voltage and depending on the polarity would do either.

 

p

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13 minutes ago, palo said:

Kooltron that I had years ago could be used to heat or cool - 12v DC voltage and depending on the polarity would do either.

 

p

I have a couple of those. But don't think they will go that hot.

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They don't actually heat or cool, but rather keep things hot or cold.

 

p


Edited by palo (log)

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25 minutes ago, palo said:

They don't actually heat or cool, but rather keep things hot or cold.

 

p

 

This one stated 300º F on it - so I suspect it would cook.

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7 hours ago, Anna N said:

IMG_0894.thumb.JPG.56b184d415c7a81a4153ed27bafe1394.JPG

 

 This is enameled cast iron I found in a thrift store. It has no markings on it other than a tiny label saying "made in Japan".  Any guesses as to its purpose?

 

 

For years, I had a 2-pan set of enameled steel(?) pans much like that. They weren't cast iron, but they were enameled metal of some sort.  They were intended for toaster-oven cooking.  I lost track of the 1- and 2-person casseroles (excuse me, hot dishes) I cooked in those pans, in my toaster oven. I think this looks like a CSO candidate.

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7 hours ago, Anna N said:

IMG_0894.thumb.JPG.56b184d415c7a81a4153ed27bafe1394.JPG

 

 This is enameled cast iron I found in a thrift store. It has no markings on it other than a tiny label saying "made in Japan".  Any guesses as to its purpose?

 

It is probably one of the Casron line - the stove top pieces have the name on the bottom.  This looks like one of the "gratin" pans and is about the right size. 

 

Screen Shot 2017-08-15 at 8.19.42 PM.png

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 This one seems to be rather shallow to suggest it as a gratin or casserole of any kind.  It almost seems like a sizzle platter. 

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In Canada, it's National Thrift Shop Day  August 17th. Value Village and Salvation Army have big discounts.  

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1 hour ago, demiglace said:

In Canada, it's National Thrift Shop Day  August 17th. Value Village and Salvation Army have big discounts.  

Exactly the day I want to stay far far away from any of them. xDxDxD

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Okay to be fair, I didn't find this myself.  A girlfriend in Florida did and passed it on to me.  It is a copy of the 1951 cookbook  "A World of Good Eating"

It is written by Helen Frost but, more important in my mind, is that the illustrations are by Helen A. Nelson.  To say they are charming is not to begin to do them justice.  Nelson had a long career illustrating books, cards and other things.  Her children look like first cousins of the Campbell Soup kids only I like them much more.

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The cookbook is divided into recipes from different regions.  Poland somehow ended up with a chapter by itself.  No mention of anything in the New World except America.  Frost lived in New England so maybe that accounts for her choices.   The Chinese recipes are curious and seem to require large amounts of green peppers.  That leaves out some  egulleters for sure.

There are a couple of recipes in the British Isles section that look worth trying.   I'll report back if they are any good.  If nothing else , the colored drawing that introduce each area could be removed and framed.  They are that cute!

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Just came back from visiting several shops. I picked up some cups and saucers that match my everyday china, and, for a big $2 a sixth edition (1954) copy of Bottoms Up by Ted Saucier. No pics because the book is full of saucy pictures of topless and nude ladies. The dustcover is clear plastic with a cup image printed on it -which only covers a small portion of the cloth covered hardback with the repeating image of a nude, front, back, and spine. Inside, there are full page color glossy pin-up type images, plus every page has tiny drawings of people, mostly topless ladies, in compromising positions. The recipes seem to be pretty basic, though. (sample recipe: a couple cubes of ice, enough gin to make the ice float, a dash of bitters) The art may be the actual highlight of this volume.

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I'd never heard of it, not being a cocktail-drinker, but it sounds like a classic bit of Rat Pack-era kitsch. 

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I was browsing at a street fair in New York today and came across this Cake Decorator set. As soon as I saw it I knew I had to have it. I also knew I wouldn't pay the asking price, which was 30 bucks. (Ridiculous.) I was trying to decide just how much I wanted the thing. Would I pay $20? Maybe. I really wanted it. Then the vendor came up to me and said, "It's yours for $10." Sold. I couldn't resist. 

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Cake Decorator1.JPG

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2 minutes ago, cakewalk said:

I was browsing at a street fair in New York today and came across this Cake Decorator set. As soon as I saw it I knew I had to have it. I also knew I wouldn't pay the asking price, which was 30 bucks. (Ridiculous.) I was trying to decide just how much I wanted the thing. Would I pay $20? Maybe. I really wanted it. Then the vendor came up to me and said, "It's yours for $10." Sold. I couldn't resist. 

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"Beauty aids the appetite". Love it! 

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On 9/9/2017 at 8:04 PM, Lisa Shock said:

Just came back from visiting several shops. I picked up some cups and saucers that match my everyday china, and, for a big $2 a sixth edition (1954) copy of Bottoms Up by Ted Saucier. No pics because the book is full of saucy pictures of topless and nude ladies. The dustcover is clear plastic with a cup image printed on it -which only covers a small portion of the cloth covered hardback with the repeating image of a nude, front, back, and spine. Inside, there are full page color glossy pin-up type images, plus every page has tiny drawings of people, mostly topless ladies, in compromising positions. The recipes seem to be pretty basic, though. (sample recipe: a couple cubes of ice, enough gin to make the ice float, a dash of bitters) The art may be the actual highlight of this volume.

 

That's an amazing find. That book is highly sought after in the cocktail world. It sells for a minimum of $50 on EBay. A copy in good condition with dust jacket will sell for over $75. I just recently picked up a copy myself but haven't had a chance to make much from it yet.

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18 hours ago, cakewalk said:

I was browsing at a street fair in New York today and came across this Cake Decorator set. As soon as I saw it I knew I had to have it. I also knew I wouldn't pay the asking price, which was 30 bucks. (Ridiculous.) I was trying to decide just how much I wanted the thing. Would I pay $20? Maybe. I really wanted it. Then the vendor came up to me and said, "It's yours for $10." Sold. I couldn't resist. 

Cake Decorator3.JPG

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Cake Decorator1.JPG

I have several of the cookie press with cake decorating tips sets that I have picked up over the years, many were never used. I think they were bought on a whim at a dime store and then the instructions were just too much to absorb so they were put aside and forgotten. 

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