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andiesenji

andiesenji

1 hour ago, boilsover said:

 

I have no idea if Forschner uses the same steel and heat-treat in all its knives.  All I know is that the boxes of Forschner butchers' knives (boning, ripping, siding) I inherited use steel that is very hard and resistant to abrasives in the finished knife.  Once sharp, they do tend to stay sharper longer than the equivalent-use knives I have.  However, once dulled, they take a lot more work to bring back to sharp.  This can be a PITA in a hunting camp.

 

I don't own any Forschner chefs' with which to compare...  

Keeping an edge on knives while out in the field can be tricky.  On one trip in the early '70s, I had "help" with my packing for a deer hunting trip to St. George, UT. I guess my husband thought the case in which I had my sharpening stones was too "heavy" for my backpack and left it out. 

When I had to field dress a buck and had done most of the basic stuff, I wanted to hone the edge - no stone.  Fortunately, Utah has local rocks called "novi" something - that our Indian guide found and it worked a treat on both my knives.  

I kept it for years until I lost it in one of my moves.

Found the name of the stone: Novaculite.  

andiesenji

andiesenji

1 hour ago, boilsover said:

 

I have no idea if Forschner uses the same steel and heat-treat in all its knives.  All I know is that the boxes of Forschner butchers' knives (boning, ripping, siding) I inherited use steel that is very hard and resistant to abrasives in the finished knife.  Once sharp, they do tend to stay sharper longer than the equivalent-use knives I have.  However, once dulled, they take a lot more work to bring back to sharp.  This can be a PITA in a hunting camp.

 

I don't own any Forschner chefs' with which to compare...  

Keeping an edge on knives while out in the field can be tricky.  On one trip in the early '70s, I had "help" with my packing for a deer hunting trip to St. George, UT. I guess my husband thought the case in which I had my sharpening stones was too "heavy" for my backpack and left it out. 

When I had to field dress a buck and had done most of the basic stuff, I wanted to hone the edge - no stone.  Fortunately, Utah has local rocks called "novi" something - that our Indian guide found and it worked a treat on both my knives.  

I kept it for years until I lost it in one of my moves.

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