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boilsover

boilsover

On 2/2/2017 at 10:05 AM, Porthos said:

I don't know what alloy Victornox uses for this knife but it took me 45 minutes, using my EdgePro, to raise the tiniest bit of a burr. I finished it for now but I suspect I will give it a second go-around starting with the 220 stone again. I believe I can do better but it does seem to be a bit of a challenge.

 

Forschner knives (at least the ones my dad bought for his packing plant) are notoriously hard, and hard to sharpen.  The theory is that they will be useful longer between sharpenings.  I also surmise that this steel/hardness was chosen recognizing that sharpenings would happen on more aggressive, powered wheels and belts.

 

Complicating sharpening further, there is so little depth on a boning knife, and it must have sufficient thickness (to twist to disjoint), you end up having uncommon thickness right behind the primary bevel.  If you had this geometry on a chef's knife, a pro sharpener would tell you you needed a reprofile job.  But if you thin that boning knife, you'd have to do it all the way to the top--at which point you've changed it away from what it can do.  I suspect most of your work on the Edge Pro was removing metal well behind the actual edge, i.e., giving the blade extra-tall primary bevels.   

 

Unless you're Cook T'ing, boning knives take a beating. IME, a rigid boning knife--like a cleaver--benefits from a convex bevel.  The problem is that few people know how to roll an edge like that.

boilsover

boilsover

On 2/2/2017 at 10:05 AM, Porthos said:

I don't know what alloy Victornox uses for this knife but it took me 45 minutes, using my EdgePro, to raise the tiniest bit of a burr. I finished it for now but I suspect I will give it a second go-around starting with the 220 stone again. I believe I can do better but it does seem to be a bit of a challenge.

 

Forschner knives (at least the ones my dad bought for his packing plant) are notoriously hard, and hard to sharpen.  The theory is that they will be useful longer between sharpenings.  I also surmise that this steel/hardness was chosen recognizing that sharpenings would happen on more aggressive, powered wheels and belts.

 

Unless you're Cook T'ing, boning knives take a beating.  

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