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Nancy in Pátzcuaro

Gardening: (2016 – 2017)

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On 8/27/2017 at 8:41 PM, DiggingDogFarm said:

I could order a stone from England for $10.24 total (including the shipping) via eBay.

But it looks quite coarse—hard to tell for sure.

More coarse than the one which I currently have—which is more coarse than what is recommended for honing an Austrian scythe.

 

:wacko:

 

 

 

 

 

On 8/27/2017 at 8:43 PM, Okanagancook said:

Well, for ten bucks it seems worth a shot at it.^_^

 

I ordered the whetstone from England.

As I suspected, it's very coarse! O.o

No good for everyday use but useful for repairing a badly damaged blade.

:)

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Killing frost last night. Everything but the lettuce bought the ranch. I was pleased to see the zucchini plants and the rapini in the far cold frame seem fine and the next crop of black seeded Simpson in the closer one are still doing well.

HC

IMG_1174.thumb.JPG.5b8f9b1bc159e71af1c70ae8b9f67e20.JPG

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Over in the breakfast topic, I got a question about the agave buds I pickled and figured this would be a better place to answer it. 

22 minutes ago, heidih said:

@blue_dolphin   Where did you source the agave buds

 

From my front yard xD  I was sorry to see those agaves go but at least I got some pickled buds to remember them by!  

 

For those unfamiliar with agaves, many of them bloom only once and then die.  Depending on the variety, it can take many years for them to bloom (hence one of their common names, "century plant") but the process is pretty dramatic.  This one went from here:

IMG_1914.thumb.jpg.6d40f9400aca4448e6c11fca7e922265.jpg

 

To here - the stage where I harvested buds - in about a month.  

IMG_2027.thumb.jpg.1c2975b5a8a03664f215089815cf79a3.jpg

 

Another month later, all the buds were open:

IMG_2062.thumb.jpg.2e61a96036de102cc91d1805aadfd23d.jpg

I think the stalk was about 12 ft tall.

 

I have more agaves but I'm hoping they won't bloom for a while as I don't want to lose more of them.  These had a pretty shape but they were only in the ground at my house for about 5 years. 

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21 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

Over in the breakfast topic, I got a question about the agave buds I pickled and figured this would be a better place to answer it. 

 

From my front yard xD  I was sorry to see those agaves go but at least I got some pickled buds to remember them by!  

 

For those unfamiliar with agaves, many of them bloom only once and then die.  Depending on the variety, it can take many years for them to bloom (hence one of their common names, "century plant") but the process is pretty dramatic.  This one went from here:

IMG_1914.thumb.jpg.6d40f9400aca4448e6c11fca7e922265.jpg

 

To here - the stage where I harvested buds - in about a month.  

IMG_2027.thumb.jpg.1c2975b5a8a03664f215089815cf79a3.jpg

 

Another month later, all the buds were open:

IMG_2062.thumb.jpg.2e61a96036de102cc91d1805aadfd23d.jpg

I think the stalk was about 12 ft tall.

 

I have more agaves but I'm hoping they won't bloom for a while as I don't want to lose more of them.  These had a pretty shape but they were only in the ground at my house for about 5 years. 

Very interesting.  So very foreign to me!

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I brought in the last of the herbs but for the bigger sage plant.  Still hoping I can figure out how to preserve sage leaves in salt before tomorrow night.

 

The rosemary badly needed to be pruned.  This made an awful mess of my dining room and necessitated help from the Shop-vac.

 

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I'd be interested in any 'sage advice' myself.  I have a lot of it on my kitchen counter right now.  Along with a couple handfuls of parsley.

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1 hour ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

I brought in the last of the herbs but for the bigger sage plant.  Still hoping I can figure out how to preserve sage leaves in salt before tomorrow night.

 I found this on Food52. You will have to scroll down a bit to find the sage leaves in salt directions. 

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2 hours ago, IndyRob said:

I'd be interested in any 'sage advice' myself.  I have a lot of it on my kitchen counter right now.  Along with a couple handfuls of parsley.

 

Take a plastic container that's deeper than your sage sprigs are tall. Put about an inch of cornmeal in the bottom. Hold the sage upside down and gently pour cornmeal to surround and cover it. Cover it with a cloth and rubber-band the cloth on, and set it in the fridge. Check your sage after a couple of weeks.

 

Mama used to do this with flowers, with a mixture of cornmeal and borax. I've tried it with herbs  (obviously without the borax). It works reasonably well.

 

The other option, of course, is to dehydrate on low heat. We haven't had a killing frost yet, so my sage plant is still thriving.

 


Edited by kayb (log)
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7 hours ago, Anna N said:

 I found this on Food52. You will have to scroll down a bit to find the sage leaves in salt directions. 

 

Exactly what I was looking for!  Thanks!

 

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7 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

...but looking at the forecast I may be a bit too late.

 

oh..yeah

we are getting hit tonight!!!!

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If you have an outdoor watering system, don't forget to drain all the pipes.

 

dcarch

 

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2 hours ago, suzilightning said:

oh..yeah

we are getting hit tonight!!!!

 

It almost made me late for work, but after unboxing Modernist Bread I cut down the sage.  The leaves are now preserved for posterity in salt.

 

And the smaller sage is resting comfortably in the dining room.

 

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I finally took out the tomatoes and the peppers.  The pole beans are still producing so they will stay till a frost gets them.   The beets and the collards will come out next week to be a part of the Thanksgiving table.  The beets will be turned into a roasted beet salad and the collards will be cooked like my grandma used to do.  Still waiting for my cauliflower and broccoli to produce fruit.  They are getting huge.  Planted some more garlic to overwinter for a spring harvest.  We are supposed to be getting more snow than usual this year according to the persimmons. Hopefully there will be minimal ice.  IMG_0402.thumb.JPG.fbad331f6b7351a1e6febdd7d99d69d4.JPG

I don't know yet how to resize the photo but here is my baby cauliflower  


Edited by joiei To add photo (log)
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Was just in the garden harvesting everything for Thursday.  It is so cool to me that 3 of my dishes, I grew myself.  Cauliflower update.  I have TINY cauliflower, about the size and look of a fancy button on a ladies blouse or sweater.  They are soooo cute.  Broccoli should be anytime now.  I don't know how long between budding and harvesting is but I am so excited.  

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On 11/1/2017 at 7:57 AM, dcarch said:

Weather report says there will be another week before frost comes.

So I am rushing to finish construction of my insulated greenhouse for all my potted plants and for seed starting for next year.

dcarch

greenhouse.thumb.jpg.d7de30a0e8f909c63fbfc25906bda526.jpg

 

Finished, the past few days as many of you who are in the area know, we had very high winds. Well The greenhouse passed the high wind test.

It also passed the insulation test. It's rather warm  inside . 

 

dcarch

5a134bb087c0e_Greenhousepatio.thumb.JPG.f744e815ca92269a6aafba09d4d8330d.JPG

 

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Love the greenhouse. Would love to have one. I'm thinking of a small version, more like an oversized cold frame, to go on the east side of my house (as there is no room on the south side; my very narrow lot runs E-W).

 

Or I may just put together a big cold frame that I can assemble/disassemble within the garden itself. Should be able to just build the panels and rig some sort of hooks to fasten them together, then anchor it to the fence, yes?

 

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Well I am way beyond done with this stupid weather - we've managed 68 to 71 for a week with overnight low in high 50's BUT predicted 88 byThanksgiving. So so erratic the plants can't adjust. GGRRR!!!  I've pretty much given up and only have some herbs and radishes (for the greens) - if we should have any rain I will forage mallow and dandelions -some mallow chubbing on the drainage water from the one pot

IMG_0387.JPG

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Today, Oracle, the sage, moved in with Rosemary at their winter residence.

HC

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I love that you name your herbs.  I now have a pot of basil named Rathbone

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