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Gardening: (2016– )


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2 hours ago, Shelby said:

OH yum.  I'm kicking myself for not ordering Palisade peaches this year.

The farm that sells peaches at my farmers market, Tenerelli Orchards, started a mail order peach business last year. They are awfully expensive but they are really good and usually pretty big. The Elegant Lady peaches I got from them this week are all 7 - 8 oz each. They have different varieties that ripen into October so if you get a yen for them and have $$ burning a hole in your pocket, you could splurge on a box. O’Henry is my favorite.
https://peaches.la 
 

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16 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

The farm that sells peaches at my farmers market, Tenerelli Orchards, started a mail order peach business last year. They are awfully expensive but they are really good and usually pretty big. The Elegant Lady peaches I got from them this week are all 7 - 8 oz each. They have different varieties that ripen into October so if you get a yen for them and have $$ burning a hole in your pocket, you could splurge on a box. O’Henry is my favorite.
https://peaches.la 
 

 

On the other hand, at Shoprite yesterday... 

 

Checkout clerk:  "What kind of apple is this?"  Me:  "It's a peach."

 

 

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30 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

On the other hand, at Shoprite yesterday... 

 

Checkout clerk:  "What kind of apple is this?"  Me:  "It's a peach."

 

 

Good heavens you mean it did not have one of those annoying stickers?!

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32 minutes ago, heidih said:

Good heavens you mean it did not have one of those annoying stickers?!

 

Thankfully not.  At least they got something right.  The peach looks lovely.  We all know it will taste like cardboard.

 

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13 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Thankfully not.  At least they got something right.  The peach looks lovely.  We all know it will taste like cardboard.

 

You can't get good peaches in Jersey?

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speaking of peaches - our orchard stone fruit is history, but there is a volunteer peach I can see from laundry room window. Little spindly thing but I've salvaged a few from  the night critters over the years. I need new glasses but thought I spied a little guy. Pulled him. Super green but will give him a couple days and see. If stuck I'll take a page and use it with Melissa Clark's green peach, ginger, basil, chicken thigh but with fish. Ridiculus to be excited by such a teensy one but... Like this but original I think behind NYT paywall  https://www.wpr.org/roasted-chicken-thighs-peaches-basil-and-ginger

 

peach.JPG

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  • 2 weeks later...

I planted a couple horseradish roots in my run of blueberry bushes 20 yrs ago. "dumb" they said. Turns out they are a happy marriage in my garden. I can dig a fresh shallow horseradish root nearly year round except for the deep frozen winter months. Like mint, "be careful" , but it is a lovely edible ground cover. Chives, wild thyme. 

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I think this cauliflower is the first time I have had success growing a brassica. I have no idea how to tell when they are ready to harvest but it seemed big enough, although not a very dense head and I decided not to push my luck. It was delicious in a cheese sauce over brown rice. Shadow was more interested in the grass.

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It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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2 hours ago, haresfur said:

I think this cauliflower is the first time I have had success growing a brassica. I have no idea how to tell when they are ready to harvest but it seemed big enough, although not a very dense head and I decided not to push my luck. It was delicious in a cheese sauce over brown rice. Shadow was more interested in the grass.

20210827_152924.thumb.jpg.a35283d8d6ede99a0e6697a0630f392d.jpg

20210827_152850.thumb.jpg.04d52fc36b794f648aa9ff7239feb4a8.jpg

Beautiful!!!

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I'll second beautiful! And your greens look great too. Hope Shadow does not try to stick a hoof through the wire in a break-in attempt. Had a horse do that. Luckily her boyfriend stayed with her and kept her calm until we noticed.

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6 hours ago, haresfur said:

I think this cauliflower is the first time I have had success growing a brassica. I have no idea how to tell when they are ready to harvest but it seemed big enough, although not a very dense head and I decided not to push my luck. It was delicious in a cheese sauce over brown rice. Shadow was more interested in the grass.

 

Cauliflower is one of the balkier brassicas to grow, so that's especially commendable (if a bit counter-intuitive). My broccoli, cabbages, Brussels sprouts and raab all grow well (and kale, of course), but cauliflower is perpetually hit-or-miss. It's a cool-weather crop and favors long springs and/or autumns, neither of which I get in my location.

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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6 hours ago, chromedome said:

Cauliflower is one of the balkier brassicas to grow, so that's especially commendable (if a bit counter-intuitive). My broccoli, cabbages, Brussels sprouts and raab all grow well (and kale, of course), but cauliflower is perpetually hit-or-miss. It's a cool-weather crop and favors long springs and/or autumns, neither of which I get in my location.

Thanks. It makes sense that it did ok, then because it's winter here, which is our wet season (at least this year; some years we don't get much rain). So crops that can handle a little frost do ok. My snow peas are coming up and I have a couple of swedes that might survive. Oh, and the Italian parsley is very happy.

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It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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My supposedly disease resistant tomatoes all got the wilt and passed.

 

Chard and peppers still going strong.

 

An ancient apple tree has borne its yearly apple  which I'll harvest soon

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2 hours ago, gfweb said:

My supposedly disease resistant tomatoes all got the wilt and passed.

 

Yup the plant pathology people are seeing that happen. Like the Corona virus mutating quickly.  Enjoy your one apple! Is it because critters eat the others or is it jut an eccentric tree?

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1 hour ago, gfweb said:

Just an old tree, I think.

 

But squirrels are always a possibility

Do you give the tree any fertilizer in the spring? My parents used to have a few old fruit trees (maybe not ancient). If we didn't fertilize, they'd barely fruit if at all. If we did it was like an explosion.

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On 8/29/2021 at 12:16 AM, heidih said:

I'll second beautiful! And your greens look great too. Hope Shadow does not try to stick a hoof through the wire in a break-in attempt. Had a horse do that. Luckily her boyfriend stayed with her and kept her calm until we noticed.

 

There's a line of hot wire because Ace kept jumping or climbing out. Shadow has been known to walk across the raised beds if he's out to eat a bit of grass. That doesn't help the vegetables. I mulched with bad hay, which was fine at first but it had enough seeds that I now have enough to bail. 

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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31 minutes ago, haresfur said:

 

There's a line of hot wire because Ace kept jumping or climbing out. Shadow has been known to walk across the raised beds if he's out to eat a bit of grass. That doesn't help the vegetables. I mulched with bad hay, which was fine at first but it had enough seeds that I now have enough to bail. 

oh the reproductive tenacity of seeds. Live & learn.

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My garlic harvest has been curing in my basement storage locker for about 10 days, and I cleaned it up today. My 44 bulbs totaled just over 3.5 kg, or about 80 grams/bulb (7 lbs 12 oz total, or about 2.8 oz each).

I'll separate out another 4 dozen or so to plant for next year, and take some more to my daughter (she got a couple of bulbs of the freshly-harvested garlic before I did the weigh-in), and what's left will probably do me for the year.

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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