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Gardening: (2016– )


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23 minutes ago, sartoric said:

@KennethThere’s my ornamental ginger. Do you know the variety ? 
 

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Here’s turmeric nearly ready to harvest.

 

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It looks to me like a red wax ginger.  I think this is one that I saw in the Singapore Botanic Gardens years ago (2012):

 

IMG_0407.thumb.jpg.838142f38156d4de528815f300c5d2b0.jpg

 

I always loved the ginger family, but as gorgeous as some of the inflorescences (is that a word?) are, the edible gingers are very plain looking - with the exception of the torch ginger...

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1 hour ago, KennethT said:

It looks to me like a red wax ginger.  I think this is one that I saw in the Singapore Botanic Gardens years ago (2012):

 

IMG_0407.thumb.jpg.838142f38156d4de528815f300c5d2b0.jpg

 

I always loved the ginger family, but as gorgeous as some of the inflorescences (is that a word?) are, the edible gingers are very plain looking - with the exception of the torch ginger...

Yes - maybe more than you want to know but well and succinctly described  https://awaytogarden.com/an-up-close-look-at-flowers-florapedia-with-carol-gracie/

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183203668_329218848568277_15575987547005171_n.jpg.b5b9f86ca85b77866e461576c79b80a0.jpg

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Posted (edited)

I was chopping some wood for my fire pit to make some ash fertilizer for the garden and found many this.

 

Look, don't give me that nonsense. Many parts of the world treat this as delicacy, sushi style.

 

OK Moderator, I should post this on the Dinner Forum?    :D

 

dcarch

 

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Edited by dcarch (log)
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7 minutes ago, dcarch said:

I was chopping some wood for my fire pit to make some ash fertilizer for the garden and found many this.

 

Look, don't give me that nonsense. Many parts of the world treat this as delicacy, sushi style.

 

OK Moderator, I should post this on the Dinner Forum?    :D

 

dcarch

 

IMG_4221.thumb.JPG.4e3e320609d84784360d54b20848e41e.JPG

 

IMG_4222.thumb.JPG.b947a8b6b7124e9e33e963ff7ccde287.JPG

 

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Deep fried with salt, they're not too bad, but I wasn't a huge fan of the aftertaste

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3 minutes ago, heidih said:

@dcarch what critter was that guy going to morph into? Looks friendly until he eats his weight x bazillion in your plants

 

I did some Googling. No. Not to look for recipes. :D

This apparently is not a bad duke. Both the larva and the adult only munch on wood, and only decayed wood.

 

dcarch

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22 minutes ago, heidih said:

@dcarch what critter was that guy going to morph into? Looks friendly until he eats his weight x bazillion in your plants

 

 

Mothra - Wikipedia

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Its good to have Morels

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When I was out doing some garden prep at my stepdaughter's place the other day, their mastiff was busily digging in the uncultivated portion of the area where my garden is. To my wonderment, she was digging up and eating the (damaging) white grubs that grow into June bugs. What a good girl! :P

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Posted (edited)

Bugs truly rule and will outlive the human race I think  Locally the skunks are the grub lovers and get rid of the lawn grubs - not that I support lawns in a drought state like California. 

Edited by heidih (log)
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Garden update du jour:

 

Have been having salads out of the garden for a week:

781669039_lotsosalads.thumb.jpg.cb8efb2d8b9efe4cfd54d2bc0f4fef5d.jpg

 

The radishes aren't quite there yet. (Please forgive fuzzy cell phone photo.)

 

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Tomatoes are getting there.

 

tomatoes2021.thumb.jpg.88afcc45839d3f915b1c38468588b794.jpg

 

Crucifers, back right, are thriving. Broccoli, cauliflower, brussels sprouts, cabbage. All new territory for me except cabbage.

 

The asparagus  bed needs weeding. At least the damn squirrels didn't eat the sets this year.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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  • 2 weeks later...

My lemongrass cuttings are rooting nicely. Soon be able to plant them out, then sit back and wait. I have another three running a few days behind but they are also showing tiny new roots.

 

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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On 5/7/2021 at 8:09 PM, kayb said:

Garden update du jour:

 

 

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Your garden looks great!  I'm late and getting everything in now.   So you just use regular weed stop in all the beds w no issues?  - Doesn't get too hot or damage the plants?  Getting tired of using mulch so maybe i'll give it a shot, thx!  

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That wasn't chicken

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3 minutes ago, Eatmywords said:

Your garden looks great!  I'm late and getting everything in now.   So you just use regular weed stop in all the beds w no issues?  - Doesn't get too hot or damage the plants?  Getting tired of using mulch so maybe i'll give it a shot, thx!  

Black plastic sheeting is the best for weed control (not like I ever get a weed in my setup (unless I've planted it, ha!)).  Make a 1" or so hole in the sheet when planting the starts.  Also makes for using less water since the plastic limits evaporation from the ground.  It's used a lot in ground based greenhouses.

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@kaybYour garden looks stunning!

 

We are way behind.  Weather was cold thus ground temp was slow to rise.  Then it rained forever.  Getting some radishes.  Some don't seem to be sprouting.  I suspect dog paws and the rain had parts in this.  Lettuce and collards are great as is the asparagus.  Planted 300 onions that look excellent--yellow, white and purple.  Planted a ton of russet and Yukon gold potatoes as well.  I'm very excited and hope those produce.  Decided not to plant any green beans.  I still have a ton that I canned last summer.  The bok choi is MUCH better than last year.  I'll be picking that soon.  Can't wait.  Oh and the okra is coming up.  Squash looks ok--jury still out.  May need to buy some plants.  Need to get to the nursery and get some eggplant --don't know why, they never grow lol.  Pumpkin plants are in.

 

This morning we planted sixty tomato plants--early girl, 4th of July, beefsteak and some cherry.  I'm going to need a nap lol.  Had to get them in because it's supposed to rain again tomorrow sigh.

 

OH and the horseradish.  If I'm understanding correctly you aren't supposed to pick it--dig it--the first year.  I think we are in trouble where we planted it.  It seems to be going crazy and it's near the asparagus.  I have no idea how to harvest etc.  but I'm looking forward to sinus blowing horseradish in the future.  Any tips are welcome.

 

Our farmer is so kind and is going to give us a huge round bale again this year for weed prevention.

 

OH and I need to plant corn but my back is telling me that needs to wait.....maybe I can get it in before the rain, if not then it'll be ok to wait until next week.

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Update:

 

I have cauliflower:

cauliflower.thumb.jpg.54e06c3fdd9762b504919ca4b433e1ed.jpg

 

and baby broccoli:

 

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And baby tomatoes.

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Also lots of lettuce, and I didn't check to see if the radishes and carrots were big enough to harvest yet.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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22 minutes ago, kayb said:

Update:

 

I have cauliflower:

cauliflower.thumb.jpg.54e06c3fdd9762b504919ca4b433e1ed.jpg

 

and baby broccoli:

 

1161059758_broccoli(2).thumb.jpg.1f1e9058517ca78db42fd84713ab8e96.jpg

 

And baby tomatoes.

681164489_tomatoes5-21(2).thumb.jpg.dea28e83809bec86c351f3d483c82931.jpg

 

Also lots of lettuce, and I didn't check to see if the radishes and carrots were big enough to harvest yet.

 

THAT is exciting!

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A few garden shots - still catching up to you folks down south...


love dense lettuce sowing - 4-5 varieties 

691DE437-44C3-40BF-A2F0-4DFF2E4B08F4.thumb.jpeg.39cc28c4e2b204df4f39357275ee282c.jpeg

 

DCE36B8F-BA9A-431A-A90D-A56BE797E8DC.thumb.jpeg.815f8124a404c53021b54f692a693793.jpeglettuce all self seeded, perennial arugula and garlic chives, lemon grass and some Vietnamese coriander

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Confetti Cilantro, miners lettuce, purple lettuce, prize choi and mustard greens

 

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On 5/21/2021 at 11:13 AM, KennethT said:

Black plastic sheeting is the best for weed control (not like I ever get a weed in my setup (unless I've planted it, ha!)).  Make a 1" or so hole in the sheet when planting the starts.  Also makes for using less water since the plastic limits evaporation from the ground.  It's used a lot in ground based greenhouses.

Thanks Ken, I started most indoors and finally got 1/2 of them in yesterday - 16 assorted beefsteak, cherry, roma, couple hybrids so I'll need to cut/slit larger openings, no biggie.   So yes, I'm familiar with the concept but was looking to know exactly what @kayb used and if she had any tips vs mulch?

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10 minutes ago, Eatmywords said:

Thanks Ken, I started most indoors and finally got 1/2 of them in yesterday - 16 assorted beefsteak, cherry, roma, couple hybrids so I'll need to cut/slit larger openings, no biggie.   So yes, I'm familiar with the concept but was looking to know exactly what @kayb used and if she had any tips vs mulch?

 

The stuff I used is sold on a roll at Lowe's as "landscape fabric." It's water-permeable. I've never had a lot of success with mulch keeping down weeds, but I do cover my beds with straw in the fall (take off the landscape fabric, put down straw about two inches thick, put landscape fabric back, add bricks to keep it down). The next spring, that's just tilled in.

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www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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25 minutes ago, kayb said:

 

The stuff I used is sold on a roll at Lowe's as "landscape fabric." It's water-permeable. I've never had a lot of success with mulch keeping down weeds, but I do cover my beds with straw in the fall (take off the landscape fabric, put down straw about two inches thick, put landscape fabric back, add bricks to keep it down). The next spring, that's just tilled in.

I find weeds make their way through the fabric solutions after 2-3 years.  I tried the cardboard lasagna method this past fall with mulch and organic matter.  There have been a few grass blades poke through, and a few other little things thus far, but easily pulled.  We will see in a few months.  Black plastic is good, but you have to figure out watering methods to permeate that layer.  Plus I dont like having anything plastic near/around what I am growing/eating. 

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The mentioned landscape fabric is used alot by landscapers here. My garden mentor disliked it because at some point it breaks down and is "with ya forever". But we have hot dry summers (or did). And yes the opportunistic weeds come through. Looking forward to seeing your garden progress.

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