Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Recommended Posts

There are a few types of arugula you can grow.  Annual and perennial varieties.  I prefer the perennial due to the flavour profile but also the fact that they come back every year, but also they do not bolt nearly as quickly as the annual variety.

 

Been having some fantastic salads from the garden over the last week (I grow 4 types of lettuce, my favourite being Deer's tongue), with at least a handful or two of arugula in each bowl!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, gfweb said:

Aha!

That makes sense

 

Oh yes. I have a friend - brilliant rocket scientist mind (Rand think tank kinda person) Perhaps her proudest accomplishment is her prolific arugula. Her other plant efforts - well let us just say she "overthinks".

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, heidih said:

 

Oh yes. I have a friend - brilliant rocket scientist mind (Rand think tank kinda person)

I have one of those...a literal rocket scientist (well...technically a guidance systems engineer, but that doesn't have the same ring to it).

Have you read about the OSIRIS-REx mission, the one that's been likened to "firing a bullet halfway round the world and hitting another bullet in flight"? He's one of the small team who made that happen.

  • Like 1

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, TicTac said:

There are a few types of arugula you can grow.  Annual and perennial varieties.  I prefer the perennial due to the flavour profile but also the fact that they come back every year, but also they do not bolt nearly as quickly as the annual variety.

 

Been having some fantastic salads from the garden over the last week (I grow 4 types of lettuce, my favourite being Deer's tongue), with at least a handful or two of arugula in each bowl!

pics or it didn't happen...   ;)

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a patch of deer tongue 

75235277-D895-484D-921C-2CD9641E651B.thumb.jpeg.906a7c789ec1a39db71f6566ec924944.jpeg

 

F7DB0BE3-63A2-43C0-9965-3A91BE4D55D6.thumb.jpeg.7c0dd94a3acf258bdfa70ad8fe421f9b.jpeg

 

and another patch with a couple other varieties (and some vagabond dill!).  I have patches of lettuce all around the property ... easy to grow in between crops and plants and if you spread your seeding out you can get 2-3 crops a year 

 

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, IowaDee said:

Wow, you could be the first person to create a recipe for stuffed asparagus.  

 

Thanks for the idea!

 

I was having problem finding bacon with long enough rashers to wrap this thing.

 

dcarch

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/2/2020 at 10:49 PM, dcarch said:

On Page 62, I posted my new way of winterizing fig tree using foam insulation borads.

 

Today, moment of truth. I opened the insulation to find out what's going on inside. 

 

1374485159_figgreenhouse2.thumb.jpg.86e9f5b7212bd43e83e617a497ce3ca6.jpg

 

2086906969_figgreenhouse3.thumb.jpg.1d3ba3c1141b1b02019b969bd8f5a1aa.jpg

 

2097371145_figgreenhouse4.thumb.jpg.cdfd5ffdc97c63a2c369ec7c72c06ecb.jpg

 

Very nice! not only the branches didn't die off like all the other winters, tthey actually starting to sprout.

 

So I did the  second phase of my experiment, turn the insulation foam boards into a vertical temporary green house , using also insulating clear Twinwall panels.

 

362469542_figgreenhouse5.thumb.jpg.084f6e9c51f14b70c45a85bf4d537119.jpg

 

Hoping for early figs.

 

dcarch

 

The latest:

 

Here is a comparison of the method of using foam to winterizing fig trees  v.s. regular method of wrapping.

The foam insulated tree has all the branches in good condition, compared with the one grown in the same  plot, same time and cutting from the same  tree, the one protected the old way of wrapping has all the old branches died off.

 

dcarch

 

 

 

534345497_winterizingfig2020c.thumb.jpg.123455814516ce7242d15225282b4767.jpg

 

786464467_winterizingfig2020a.thumb.jpg.02e152af5dbc89706c68a392c5beedaf.jpg

 

84940996_winterizingfig2020.thumb.JPG.221e993973e2609c2374762187af778f.JPG

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have baby tomatoes, baby zucchini and baby yellow squash. And eggplant blooms.

 

I think I'll be eating squash and zucchini by next weekend.

 

  • Like 5

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm really happy to see all of my plants doing well now. When I took them out of their original pots, I had to trim some roots in order to be able to completely dry root them in prep for transfer into my hydroponic system (coco coir).

 

20200607_165356_HDR.thumb.jpg.6ff9f52743db6808cedecb025f67930e.jpg

Rau ram doing great

 

20200607_165410.thumb.jpg.77ada5680f47676e0d7c5e8a71e2dc97.jpg

New growth buds on the curry plant

 

20200607_165345_HDR.thumb.jpg.7be03c883c62e31d4e3098368536f95b.jpg

Family photo. The arrangement and plant heights are done purposely to give each plant the desired amount of light from my sole light source. There's also a new growth bud on the kaffir lime tree. 

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, we're getting there.

 

Baby zucchini:

20200608_090516.thumb.jpg.d87dc3293f6e19ddcb020293217ec1dc.jpg

 

Baby yellow squash:

20200608_090324.thumb.jpg.7338f711aa928a47fdd94d83bc7779b6.jpg

 

Eggplant bloom:

20200609_094337.thumb.jpg.90565a582f099834e7eb46fbc412d80d.jpg

 

Baby tomatoes:

20200609_094317.thumb.jpg.38400f67dbcd459fb3e22c95e102d460.jpg

 

And the squirrels did not eat all the asparagus sets. Two have come up.

 

20200608_090657.thumb.jpg.97d8b1021c12b909f910973d2820a0be.jpg

  • Like 8
  • Thanks 1

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Shelby said:

Wow, it all looks really great Kay!  So glad some asparagus was left!  How many years before you can pick?  I forget...they sell 1,2 and 3 year crowns?

 

I think these were one-year. When I replant next year, I'm going to get two-year in a attempt to catch up. I think you can pick the third year.

  • Like 2

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, rotuts said:

@kayb 

 

too bad EggPlant has ' fruit '  or ' $#%(Y&#$_(%&#@% '

 

it would be a nice ' ornamental ' w just flowers 

 

drunk.jpeg.a2989401a893c349dabed369a57d24e4.jpeg

Even tomato and potato flowers are pretty, though small.

A few of my potatoes fruited last year. I've had the fruit in my fridge over the winter to preserve and vernalize them, and I'm going to see if I can grow potatoes from actual seed this year. Just because I think it'd be cool. :)

  • Like 2

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, TicTac said:

@kayb - do you not eat your zucc flowers??

 

 

 

I have never tried them. But I have some milk that's about to go south, so I think I'll make some ricotta, stuff a few and try my hand at it.

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, kayb said:

 

I have never tried them. But I have some milk that's about to go south, so I think I'll make some ricotta, stuff a few and try my hand at it.

 

 

My neighborhood title given by kids was "Mrs K - the one that cooks flowers". We like then in  thin rice flour batter and served with a sweet and hot chili dip. Mind possible bees - they sometimes get caught inside.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, kayb said:

 

I have never tried them. But I have some milk that's about to go south, so I think I'll make some ricotta, stuff a few and try my hand at it.

 

I enjoy the stuffed ricotta method (I will often add things like crispy pancetta to the ricotta)

 

I also like to pan sear the flowers freshly washed on high heat with some garlic and onions, sometimes chili - de-glaze with white wine and butter at the end and serve on crusty bread.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, rotuts said:

@chromedome 

 

""   tomato and potato flowers are pretty "'

 

yes they are.

 

but unlike the """ 96-9ARY39YR ''   ""  $T(^#_(RT^#(RY(#YRn  ""

 

they deliver , you know

 

later .



LOL One day I'm going to make something with eggplant, green bell papers, raisins, celery, corn and cilantro...just to push everybody's buttons.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 4

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...