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Nancy in Pátzcuaro

Gardening: (2016– )

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5 hours ago, heidih said:

 

Lupine are my childhood favorite. We had a big hillside above us. The odd juxtaposition of a radar station and a lush lupine field.

My ex-wife's grandmother grew lupine in her garden at the farm in northern BC (just outside Fort St. John), though it was always a struggle.

I vividly remember my ex's shock after we moved to NS, and she saw them growing wild along the highway embankments for several km at a stretch. They do so here in NB as well, though not as lavishly.

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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Just came in from planting yellow, white and red onions along with red potatoes and Yukon gold taters.  Oh and some lettuce (old seeds we will see if they grow) and Pak Choi (experiment, never planted it before...might be too hot already here).

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I just ordered some plant starts from Well Sweep herb garden for things that are either too slow to grow from seed, stuff I can't find seeds for, or stuff that's just plain hard to find in general...  I ordered a curry-leaf plant, lemongrass, sawtooth coriander (culantro), kaffir lime (I don't think it's a whole tree - probably a cutting from a tree, which is fine since I only want the leaves), and some rau ram (vietnamese coriander).  They're in NJ and I asked them to ship on the days that seemed like they'd be the warmest this week so they survive the day in transit

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We’re having a seedling and seed shortage here, probably due to panic buying by non gardeners. Heard someone walked out of a nursery with broccoli seedlings saying “yay, broccoli in 2 weeks” yeah right. 
 

The Tibouchina is flowering, a beautiful colour. Shame about the bare patch, a product of the recent drought, it will be pruned back heavily soon.

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We’re harvesting lots of mizuna for leafy green dishes.

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We’ve also got lettuce (cos and butter) sufficient for current needs, a large butternut squash patch, jap pumpkin, sweet potato and regular potatoes. These first little guys are destined to be steamed and slathered in butter. I will do this while husband is in his shed, there’s not enough to share, lol.

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We have also picked okra and two types of green beans. 
This is a huegelkulture bed, I think we’ll plant cauliflower and broccoli (if we can get seeds somehow). Behind it the kumquat tree is full of fruit, they are slowly ripening. The brandy is waiting.

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A weird one - this is wild tobacco, should be pulled as it’s a weed. However, it’s also said to be a great substitute for toilet paper...keeping this one in the ground.

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Posted (edited)

@sartoric That s an amazingly deeply colored "tib". We have lots but more  pink. Great assortment of vegetables. Unpredictable harvests inspire creativity. My old kumquat had younguns during drought with no supplemental water. Thus small fruit and very seedy. Fragrant though. This little bowl had this many seeds (a water issue - self preservation). I got the jam too dark so no image but it has a "deep" flavor,  We had a good bit of rain last 2 weeks and are expecting 10F jump in temps this week so the fruit should be juicier in a couple weeks. 

IMG_1270.JPG

IMG_1271.JPG


Edited by heidih (log)
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19 hours ago, heidih said:

@sartoric That s an amazingly deeply colored "tib". We have lots but more  pink. Great assortment of vegetables. Unpredictable harvests inspire creativity. My old kumquat had younguns during drought with no supplemental water. Thus small fruit and very seedy. Fragrant though. This little bowl had this many seeds (a water issue - self preservation). I got the jam too dark so no image but it has a "deep" flavor,  We had a good bit of rain last 2 weeks and are expecting 10F jump in temps this week so the fruit should be juicier in a couple weeks. 

IMG_1270.JPG

IMG_1271.JPG

 


Are your kumquats fruiting now ? Is my tree out of whack, or yours ?

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5 minutes ago, sartoric said:


Are your kumquats fruiting now ? Is my tree out of whack, or yours ?

 

Usually December is start of prime citrus but our weather was so off track. Plus we had no water for a long time so who knows.  The oranges are very showy now. Here us 1.  

IMG_1272.JPG

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6 minutes ago, heidih said:

 

Usually December is start of prime citrus but our weather was so off track. Plus we had no water for a long time so who knows.  The oranges are very showy now. Here us 1.  

IMG_1272.JPG


Wow, my orange tree is only a few weeks from looking exactly the same. We’ve had lots of mandarins from tree 1, and tree 2 is ripening now. Also had big drought of course. One theory is the trees all thought they’d die in the prolonged drought, so were desperate to reproduce. I reckon that’s how we got 90 odd mangos from a smallish tree. 


Edited by sartoric Fix typo (log)
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On 3/29/2020 at 11:19 PM, sartoric said:

A weird one - this is wild tobacco, should be pulled as it’s a weed. However, it’s also said to be a great substitute for toilet paper...keeping this one in the ground.

 

😂


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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On Page 62, I posted my new way of winterizing fig tree using foam insulation borads.

 

Today, moment of truth. I opened the insulation to find out what's going on inside. 

 

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Very nice! not only the branches didn't die off like all the other winters, tthey actually starting to sprout.

 

So I did the  second phase of my experiment, turn the insulation foam boards into a vertical temporary green house , using also insulating clear Twinwall panels.

 

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Hoping for early figs.

 

dcarch

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1 hour ago, dcarch said:

On Page 62, I posted my new way of winterizing fig tree using foam insulation borads.

Today, moment of truth. I opened the insulation to find out what's going on inside. 

Hoping for early figs.

 

dcarch

 

Good result! Always interesting to see what people strive for in a climate not suited to the desired plant. My north England friend just went along when his mum crowed about her jade overwintering. A weed to us. We always seem to want what we can't have like lilacs and blueberries  in S California - though Monrovia and other growers have created hybrids. We really have trouble with rhubarb and other veggies that like a very cold cycle. And I would love to experience a maple tapped and taste that first light dribble before boiling syrup. 

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Uncovered my parsley plants and they are good and healthy.  Just had to weed out the dead parts.

Want to put in some tarragon and sage.  The Greek oregano is going on as well.

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Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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