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Nancy in Pátzcuaro

Gardening: (2016– )

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@heidihwe’ve become mad seed savers. I have tomato seeds, butternut pumpkin, corn, apricots and various other little dishes of seeds scattered around drying. The passion fruit might not need an understory, we want to take advantage of the enclosure and improved soil. Trying to make every square inch count !

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This is the guy I mentioned about passion vines  https://www.lbcc.edu/staff-highlights/passion-garden Passion fruit starts just after minute 7  - looong but he s a "passionate" speaker worthy of a look and educational 

 

 

My citrus are super late and even Thanksgiving cactus just starting to bloom. We had extreme heat then way cold but with slow gentle rain. Stressed but resilient  plants. My nasturtium patch is coming up and there are other patches here and there. . The tender leaves are good eating.  

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@sartoric The Aussie one start at round minute 20 in the second link lecture

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10 hours ago, dcarch said:

 

Good source of off-grid protein?  🙂

 

dcarch

 

The bats and parrots don't tend to stick around

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It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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16 hours ago, haresfur said:

 

The bats and parrots don't tend to stick around

 

Unless you have someone like my brother in law around who hand feeds the cockies, kookaburras, and lorikeets. The cockies tap on kitchen window if he is late!

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5 hours ago, heidih said:

 

Unless you have someone like my brother in law around who hand feeds the cockies, kookaburras, and lorikeets. The cockies tap on kitchen window if he is late!

 

but they don't end up in the fruit basket like the bugs! 😀

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It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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If it will ever quit raining, I am ready to get my yard guy to come down and put in my raised beds for my garden. I'm planning on three, maybe four, beds, about 6 x 12 feet. One will be a tomato bed, possibly with a couple of pepper plants at one end. One will be an asparagus bed, something I have always wanted. One will hold a couple of hills of yellow crookneck squash, a couple of hills of zucchini, a couple of hills of cucumbers, which will be a gracious plenty to provide for summer eating and some preserving. If there is a fourth, it will be for me to plant some spring peas and some Kentucky Wonder green beans, since I can find the dang things no where else. 

 

I will be planting herbs in the flower bed just off the back porch, for ease of quick harvest when I'm cooking. As that is on the north side of the house, I'm hoping the cilantro and parsley will last a bit longer; it used to suffer badly in the sun on the west side of my former house.

 

I have nearly missed the window to plant trees, but I want a pear tree and a fig tree. May have to call a nursery tomorrow and see if we can get those in before spring gets here.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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My warrigal greens are going to town. I need to move them to a bigger pot or take some cuttings. These are an Australian & New Zealand native. They have cool little yellow flowers that grow from the base of the leaves. I've only cooked with them once and they seemed pretty tasty. You are supposed to blanch them to remove the oxalate.

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It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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I grow that plant here under the name New Zealand Spinach.

i Eat it raw in salads...the small tips.  The  larger leaves I use like regular spinach.  It seems to like very rich soil.  Last year a rogue plant started in the compost bin and it was the best plant ever.

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Love it - always cook. Farmer Market folks often have it.

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Love it - learned something new - warrigal greens!

 

Sadly at a balmy -14 prior to the windchill, there is no outdoor gardening at the moment, besides visually planning a new addition to my front yard veg garden transformation, evolution; extraordinaire.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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17 hours ago, Okanagancook said:

I grow that plant here under the name New Zealand Spinach.

i Eat it raw in salads...the small tips.  The  larger leaves I use like regular spinach.  It seems to like very rich soil.  Last year a rogue plant started in the compost bin and it was the best plant ever.

Warning!

They will take over your garden. Don't plant too many.

 

dcarch

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7 hours ago, dcarch said:

Warning!

They will take over your garden. Don't plant too many.

 

dcarch

 

I'm thinking of seeing how they do as a ground cover out front. I have an unused raised bed, too.

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It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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1 hour ago, haresfur said:

 

I'm thinking of seeing how they do as a ground cover out front. I have an unused raised bed, too.

 

That should work.

Insects,  rabbits don't seem to like them.

 

dcarch

 

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Here’s a garden update ! 
The veggie bed is going great after a weed and a feed, plus my handyman has installed a door to make it easier to get in and out.

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A neighbour gave us a mature bunya pine cone. 
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They’re easy to pull apart to remove the seeds.

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Apparently, the easiest way to prepare them is to boil for a couple hours. Said to taste like chestnuts....there will be a stir fry in the future.

 

Gratuitous mango shot here. I’ve made pickle, chutney and this lot are destined for the freezer. These are just the ones that have fallen off the tree. I’m giving them away as fast as I can, typically though, nearly everyone I know also has a tree.

This was yesterday’s pick up, there’s another eleven on the back deck from this morning :)

 

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Happy days in paradise.

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If only international shipping wasn't so expensive, I would be thrilled to take them off your hands!

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 I wasn't planning on any gardening until I moved into our new apartment, but it seems like that won't be happening for quite a while.  Our new building is currently not allowing renovations or workpeople in the building and I imagine that is going to last for at least 1-2 months.  Then I've got probably about 2months of renovations.  So, since I won't be going anywhere for a while, I figured now would be a good time to start up my indoor garden again... so far planned: herbs like cilantro, mint, lemongrass, rau ram (vietnamese coriander)...

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I won't dignify it by calling it gardening but we periodically harvest mache and sorrel from a galvanized stock water tank.    The mache is volunteer, year after year, while the sorrel, once started, just GROWS.    Also several clumps of chard which I hope will supply greens during these sketchy times.

Mache = salad material, and may become a cooked green

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Sorrel

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Today's sorrel soup

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I wish i had had better foresight several months ago in terms of a useful greens patch.

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eGullet member #80.

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I ordered my seeds, seed potatoes (red and Yukon Gold!) and onion sets a while back.  I was kind of worried I wouldn't get them due to being sold out or mailing problems because of how times are now, but they came Friday.  Ground is too wet to plant, but hoping to get in the garden the end of next week for the taters and onions.  Hoping I have some lettuce seeds somewhere.  I didn't order any because it bolts so soon here in hot Kansas.  Now, I don't care if it bolts soon because who knows if lettuce will be available in the store.

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51 minutes ago, Shelby said:

Hoping I have some lettuce seeds somewhere.  I didn't order any because it bolts so soon here in hot Kansas.  Now, I don't care if it bolts soon because who knows if lettuce will be available in the store.

 

The logistics are often hard to organize, but I always try to find a spot where my lettuce gets morning sun and afternoon shade. It seems to help (though NB certainly doesn't get as hot as Kansas, I'm sure...).

Also planting at frequent intervals, so you always have some coming along when the earlier batch bolts, is helpful.

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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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A short garden tour.

 

 

 

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~ Shai N.

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Not nearly as exciting, where I am. My "garden tour" would show the last couple inches of melting snow, with mud and a few green shoots beneath.

Here where I live (my garden is outside the city, about 40 minutes by hwy and ferry) the snow is gone and grass is starting to grow. Saw my first caterpillar and a couple of flies yesterday. It's rare that "real" spring arrives in close conjunction with "calendar" spring (usually March feels more like "late winter") but this year that's how it worked out.

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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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I guess, since it seems to be intent on raining forever, I'll garden hydroponically. I think it'll be July before my yard dries out enough to get a garden spot ready.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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On 3/22/2020 at 10:05 AM, shain said:

A short garden tour.

 

 

 

 

 

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Lupine are my childhood favorite. We had a big hillside above us. The odd juxtaposition of a radar station and a lush lupine field.

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In an Uber Sunday I noticed the vines pruned way back on a road adjacent vineyard. Amazing how they shoot back. The windbreak is olives so that cool combo of dusty grey olives and bright green new growth of the grapes = stunning. 

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