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Nancy in Pátzcuaro

Gardening: (2016– )

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2 hours ago, Shelby said:

First zucchini!  

IMG_6499.jpg.0913cf73c4566ac8e3b3469d6c75a679.jpg

We are going to have a lot of potatoes.  This was only 3 plants.  We have about a billion more lol.

 

 

Looks great, Shelby.

 

Do you harvest garlic at various stages of Spring development, or just when bulbs are large?

 

I experimented this year with a few zucchini plants in large pales - we have had tons of zucchini flowers and at least a dozen baby zucchini (we like them small, though I do leave some to get as large as the above).  Apparently the heat containment from the pale has made the zucc's very happy girls.

 

The ones in the ground are doing equally well, though not as early of producers, far larger and they are producing at least 4-6 flowers (I hope you eat those, Shelby!) on a daily basis.

 

Garlic Scapes are up, as are the snap peas.  It is an exciting time for us lovers 'o food!

 

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I am missing having a garden this year. However, a month of seeing how the sun falls (I have a good many trees) has schooled me on where it needs to go. Will get raised beds put in this fall, treat them well with horse manure, and have them ready to go next spring. I'm also on the lookout for someone's discarded patio glass doors, to make the tops for some cold frames.

 

Flower beds to each side of the back steps will serve nicely for herbs. Having learned my lesson the hard way, there is a large iron kettle in which the mint will live, so's not to overrun everything else. 

 

I have a loaded down apple tree in my back yard, and two pecan trees in the front. One tree has lots of baby pecans; the other, none. What's that all about? This is my first venture into pecan trees.

 

Will be planting a fig tree and a pear tree this fall. Won't get much, if any, fruit for a couple of years, but I'm thinking ahead. Oh, and there will be an asparagus bed.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Here they come! 

4 other plants also have chokes coming.

The other 4 shouldn't be far behind.

 

dcarch

 

799586608_artichoke2019c.thumb.JPG.e1a654dbcd42fa553b72e8d6f1c36e08.JPG

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On 6/29/2019 at 10:43 AM, TicTac said:

Looks great, Shelby.

 

Do you harvest garlic at various stages of Spring development, or just when bulbs are large?

 

I experimented this year with a few zucchini plants in large pales - we have had tons of zucchini flowers and at least a dozen baby zucchini (we like them small, though I do leave some to get as large as the above).  Apparently the heat containment from the pale has made the zucc's very happy girls.

 

The ones in the ground are doing equally well, though not as early of producers, far larger and they are producing at least 4-6 flowers (I hope you eat those, Shelby!) on a daily basis.

 

Garlic Scapes are up, as are the snap peas.  It is an exciting time for us lovers 'o food!

 

Hi!  Thank you!

 

Although I do have some garlic planted--I've never harvested it and it grows up every spring.  Heaven knows what it looks like underground lol--anyway, those are onions.

 

Nice that your zukes are doing so well!  It is an exciting time :) 

19 hours ago, kayb said:

I am missing having a garden this year. However, a month of seeing how the sun falls (I have a good many trees) has schooled me on where it needs to go. Will get raised beds put in this fall, treat them well with horse manure, and have them ready to go next spring. I'm also on the lookout for someone's discarded patio glass doors, to make the tops for some cold frames.

 

Flower beds to each side of the back steps will serve nicely for herbs. Having learned my lesson the hard way, there is a large iron kettle in which the mint will live, so's not to overrun everything else. 

 

I have a loaded down apple tree in my back yard, and two pecan trees in the front. One tree has lots of baby pecans; the other, none. What's that all about? This is my first venture into pecan trees.

 

Will be planting a fig tree and a pear tree this fall. Won't get much, if any, fruit for a couple of years, but I'm thinking ahead. Oh, and there will be an asparagus bed.

 

Kay, I know you're missing it, but it won't be long before next spring!!  Very jealous of your apple and pecan trees!

14 hours ago, dcarch said:

Here they come! 

4 other plants also have chokes coming.

The other 4 shouldn't be far behind.

 

dcarch

 

799586608_artichoke2019c.thumb.JPG.e1a654dbcd42fa553b72e8d6f1c36e08.JPG

Artichoke envy.

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19 hours ago, kayb said:

I am missing having a garden this year. However, a month of seeing how the sun falls (I have a good many trees) has schooled me on where it needs to go. Will get raised beds put in this fall, treat them well with horse manure, and have them ready to go next spring. I'm also on the lookout for someone's discarded patio glass doors, to make the tops for some cold frames.

 

Flower beds to each side of the back steps will serve nicely for herbs. Having learned my lesson the hard way, there is a large iron kettle in which the mint will live, so's not to overrun everything else. 

 

I have a loaded down apple tree in my back yard, and two pecan trees in the front. One tree has lots of baby pecans; the other, none. What's that all about? This is my first venture into pecan trees.

 

Will be planting a fig tree and a pear tree this fall. Won't get much, if any, fruit for a couple of years, but I'm thinking ahead. Oh, and there will be an asparagus bed.

 

OHHHHHH.... fig tree!!!!!!


Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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Didn't get to much in to the vegetable garden but enjoyed some lettuce, peas, and radishes (not pictured) before the weather go too hot. Hopefully I'll do better with the fall crop.

IMG_5630-pickage.jpg.c71d1b1c58a24ce93e4bc1db9d667acc.jpg

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My first harvest from my (newly planted) garden consisted of a couple of green onions that had been missed last autumn and over-wintered successfully, my garlic scapes, and a large bag of "volunteer" greens (specifically, in this case, dandelions and wild sorrel). The dandelions were added to a "mess o' greens" which otherwise came from the supermarket, and the sorrel plus green onions plus a few scapes plus some chicken broth became a small pot of soup at lunch today.

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"The only questions that really matter are the ones you ask yourself."

Ursula K. Le Guin

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

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Posted (edited)

If you garden, organic or non-organic, you will need to spray. Do you find it fun to have to spray?

Most of the sprayers you buy only work for a couple of seasons. 

On a hot humid summer day, pump pump pump pump --- take a shower, change underwear, more pump pump pump again ----more showers ------ more pump pump pump.

I can't believe  everything in our life is so advanced and we are still gardening with 100 year old technology.

 

So I bought a $17.00 12v pump, and a $5.00 old MacBook rechargeable battery, changed the "plumbing" of a defective sprayer.

Awesome! this simple electric sprayer can get a much better spraying  job done in one fifth the time and without the sweating.

They do sell motorized sprayers, but they are expensive, not reliable, and too big.

I highly recommend making one yourself. Really worth it.  It is not impossible to hookup an electric pump with a battery and a switch.

 

dcarch

sprayer.thumb.JPG.f275536a5ffb356c606e51776783dfc3.JPG

 


Edited by dcarch (log)
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7 minutes ago, dcarch said:

If you garden, organic or non-organic, you will need to spray. Do you find it fun to have to spray?

Most of the sprayers you buy only work for a couple of seasons. 

On a hot humid summer day, pump pump pump pump --- take a shower, change underwear, more pump pump pump again ----more showers ------ more pump pump pump.

I can't believe  everything in our life is so advanced and we are still gardening with 100 year old technology.

 

So I bought a $17.00 12v pump, and a $5.00 old MacBook rechargeable battery, changed the "plumbing" of a defective sprayer.

Awesome! this simple electric sprayer can get a much better spraying  job done in one fifth the time and without the sweating.

They do sell motorized sprayers, but they are expensive, not reliable, and too big.

I highly recommend making one yourself. Really worth it.  It is not impossible to hookup an electric pump with a battery and a switch.

 

dcarch

sprayer.thumb.JPG.f275536a5ffb356c606e51776783dfc3.JPG

 

 

 

Looks like a bomb. ATF may come knocking. 

 

But  great idea. I despise all sprayers. 

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18 minutes ago, gfweb said:

 

Looks like a bomb. ATF may come knocking. 

 

But  great idea. I despise all sprayers. 

 

Yes it can be a bomb, if you use an air pump without a pressure regulator.

This is a self-priming water pump. No pressure buildup.

 

dcarch

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Fry it up, breakfast.

 

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Posted (edited)

Meanwhile, the petunias are going nicely in my Manhattan Containers.  

 

IMG_0547.JPG.24cf404624784b28a7aaf1d7306ca16d.JPG

 

Speaking of okra -- did I mention that my Mississippi cousin suggested that I plant okra in my windowboxes once, after I complained about how ungodly high the okra is around here when it finally is available?  I wonder what my building would make of me planting food in my windowboxes . . . .

 

ETA:  Please ignore the frayed condition of the windowsill.  As you can probably guess, I tend to leave the windows open (to varying extents), no matter the weather.

 

Edited again:  I just discovered that there is a whole separate thread devoted to flower gardens.  Sorry!

  

 


Edited by SLB (log)
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21 hours ago, dcarch said:

If you garden, organic or non-organic, you will need to spray. Do you find it fun to have to spray?

Most of the sprayers you buy only work for a couple of seasons. 

On a hot humid summer day, pump pump pump pump --- take a shower, change underwear, more pump pump pump again ----more showers ------ more pump pump pump.

I can't believe  everything in our life is so advanced and we are still gardening with 100 year old technology.

 

So I bought a $17.00 12v pump, and a $5.00 old MacBook rechargeable battery, changed the "plumbing" of a defective sprayer.

Awesome! this simple electric sprayer can get a much better spraying  job done in one fifth the time and without the sweating.

They do sell motorized sprayers, but they are expensive, not reliable, and too big.

I highly recommend making one yourself. Really worth it.  It is not impossible to hookup an electric pump with a battery and a switch.

 

dcarch

sprayer.thumb.JPG.f275536a5ffb356c606e51776783dfc3.JPG

 

 

 

No spraying of any sort goes on in my garden besides that of my water hose!

 

Full till organic soil.

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1 hour ago, SLB said:

Meanwhile, the petunias are going nicely in my Manhattan Containers.  

 

IMG_0547.JPG.24cf404624784b28a7aaf1d7306ca16d.JPG

 

Speaking of okra -- did I mention that my Mississippi cousin suggested that I plant okra in my windowboxes once, after I complained about how ungodly high the okra is around here when it finally is available?  I wonder what my building would make of me planting food in my windowboxes . . . .

 

ETA:  Please ignore the frayed condition of the windowsill.  As you can probably guess, I tend to leave the windows open (to varying extents), no matter the weather.

 

Edited again:  I just discovered that there is a whole separate thread devoted to flower gardens.  Sorry!

  

 

 

When I had more time, I've grown a decent amount of food in my Manhattan apt... Why should your building care?

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I guess it's not like keeping chickens on the fire escape.  

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Do you like Royal Corona beans? Not cheap. 

 

I am growing them. Seems to be doing very well. I will have a good supply this year. 

 

dcarch

 

1953736985_coronabeans.thumb.JPG.4e61e6fd13ad77f1545a08bcc318ebef.JPG945204069_coronabeans3.thumb.JPG.3bacaf87500b64a05a41181e0a78df25.JPG

 

1466995983_coronabeans2.thumb.jpg.88345fc6d93664933ce4593e3047f01b.jpg

 

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1 hour ago, dcarch said:

Do you like Royal Corona beans? Not cheap. 

 

I am growing them. Seems to be doing very well. I will have a good supply this year. 

 

dcarch

 

1953736985_coronabeans.thumb.JPG.4e61e6fd13ad77f1545a08bcc318ebef.JPG945204069_coronabeans3.thumb.JPG.3bacaf87500b64a05a41181e0a78df25.JPG

 

1466995983_coronabeans2.thumb.jpg.88345fc6d93664933ce4593e3047f01b.jpg

 

Yes  Love those beans!!

 

Can you just plant..  those from Rancho Gordo?


Its good to have Morels

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On 7/8/2019 at 11:36 AM, Shelby said:

A rather meager pick this morning.  What exactly does a person do with just one okra 🙃

 

IMG_6546.jpg.64709d1972a52746f6d566224165b8c1.jpg

The same as with many okra

 

nothing

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On 7/8/2019 at 11:36 AM, Shelby said:

A rather meager pick this morning.  What exactly does a person do with just one okra 🙃

 

IMG_6546.jpg.64709d1972a52746f6d566224165b8c1.jpg

I keep picturing the old Bugs Bunny cartoon where he's in the fancy restaurant eating a lone carrot on a plate with a fork and knife...

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7 hours ago, Paul Bacino said:

Yes  Love those beans!!

 

Can you just plant..  those from Rancho Gordo?

 

Yes you can.

 

I think you should start seedlings indoors. If you plant the beans outside, there is a chance those beans may become dinner for garden critters.

 

dcarch

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My first tomatoes are turning red.

 

I came home tonight to letter from the rental agent to please remove the planters from my balcony immediately.

 

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1 minute ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

My first tomatoes are turning red.

 

I came home tonight to letter from the rental agent to please remove the planters from my balcony immediately.

 

That sucks. Does it mean straight dirt on the balcony?

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1 minute ago, Kerry Beal said:

That sucks. Does it mean straight dirt on the balcony?

 

Seriously I don't know.  I'd be the first to admit I have a lot of plants in a small space, but I am not the only one with a lot of plants who lives here.  Two years ago the rental agent told me that two of my planters needed to be removed by order of the owner because she (the owner) thought they looked too heavy.  At that time the rental agent said the rest of my planters were fine.  Years ago I checked with the township building inspector who told be these balconies were rated for an obscene amount of weight.

 

However even if I wanted to remove the planters, the larger ones I could not move myself.  I'm more physically challenged than I used to be.  And at the moment I am terribly upset, more so than I wish to admit on a public forum.

 

 

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