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Nancy in Pátzcuaro

Gardening: (2016– )

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My meager ramps patch this year.

 

025.thumb.jpg.d04e8a7a8ddb0383cf28f3758bec3067.jpg

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30 minutes ago, gfweb said:

My meager ramps patch this year.

 

025.thumb.jpg.d04e8a7a8ddb0383cf28f3758bec3067.jpg

 

Party! Party! Party!  :D

 

dcarch

 

 

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10 hours ago, dcarch said:

 

Hydrogen peroxide. Not sure about dilution proportion.

 

dcarch

 

 

Rubbng alcahol is how we clean thngs like mealybugs off growing plants. We spray it on. Plant doesn't care but bugs get suffocted. Work on fungus too. 

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16 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Starting from household laundry bleach, what would be a good dilution for sanitizing my Click & Grow growing unit?  I seem to have a fungus problem.

 

If you want to sanitize while you have plants growing in there, I would use hydrogen peroxide - but I'd stay away from the stuff you get in the drugstore as it contains additives and stabilizers.  Instead, you can get 17% or 35% H2O2 which don't require additives because it is stable at those percentages.  Be very careful when you use that stuff because if you get it on your skin, it will burn.  I've used 17% for years with my lime tree - about 8ml per gallon works fine to sanitize the system and won't hurt the plants.

 

If you are not growing anything at the moment, then using a bleach solution will be fine.  Just make sure it's rinsed thoroughly and allowed to air dry before putting plants back in.  Also, don't add bleach to the soil since it will kill all the microorganisms in there, which will make it very hard for plants to uptake nutrients.

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I would be sanitizing without plants.  I need to be sure that whatever I use doesn't affect the plastic.  I'm not quite ready to sanitize because one pea plant is currently struggling to produce a pod.

 

Meanwhile I put my Burpee order in today.  I was a bit tardy this year and zinnia* seeds I wanted were out of stock.  How can you be out of stock of zinnia seeds?

 

 

*note:  zinnia are edible.

 

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14 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

I would be sanitizing without plants.  I need to be sure that whatever I use doesn't affect the plastic.  I'm not quite ready to sanitize because one pea plant is currently struggling to produce a pod.

 

Meanwhile I put my Burpee order in today.  I was a bit tardy this year and zinnia* seeds I wanted were out of stock.  How can you be out of stock of zinnia seeds?

 

 

*note:  zinnia are edible.

 

OK - then bleach would be the way to do it most easily without procuring specialty stuff. 

 

Also, in addition to bleach or H2O2, there another option for sanitizing while plants are still there and growing - hypochlorous acid - yes it is basically bleach, but there are plant/food grade versions (made from calcium hypochlorite) without all the other additives that bleach has - and it doesn't have any sodium.  Check out UC Roots - it's actually more effective than H2O2 since it won't degrade as quickly... just make sure your sanitizing solution has a pH of about 5.5.

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Sorry I misread. You have a "small operation". So unscientifiic but when we sanitize our 3-1/2" plastic pots for seedling transplant we just stick them in a tub of water and add household bleach like you would add salad dressing. A pour over. Seems to work well in the greenhouse. There is always fungus among us ;)

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This evening I turned my attention to the outdoor garden.  I cultivated the balcony, cleared the old tomato plants, harvested moonflower seeds.  Well after dark I planted peas.

 

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My LED lights seem to work very well.

 

dcarch

 

All tomatoes are blossoming, many have fruits

493431173_LEDlighttomatoesfruiting.thumb.jpg.37a689281d2271426ab1aff44a426e44.jpg

 

Cute little okra

1737839370_LEDlightokra.thumb.jpg.1b6dc55fe8abbea481d91c89c1ea90f2.jpg

 

Ground cherries are also fruiting

1980712178_LEDlightgroundcharry.thumb.jpg.3feab43af3bffdb617c298755637b7c5.jpg

 

Some climbers

1794209028_LEDlightclimbers.thumb.jpg.6c5268a5aea69cff151532efc3b4c822.jpg

 

3 of my 10 artichoke are already 18" tall

835741710_LEDlightartichokes.thumb.JPG.fd3dabbeeae75917c0abbf688a5a5a6a.JPG

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FWIW,

Here's another view of the dirt cheap poor man's grow light set-up.

Turned off and at a different angle.

 

GrowLights2 (1).jpg

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~Martin :)

I try to find the good food in every situation!

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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38 minutes ago, gfweb said:

@dcarch what lights do you use?

 

The lights are shown on my post midway on page 50 of this Gardening thread.

 

Not sure how to link to it.

 

dcarch

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1 hour ago, dcarch said:

 

The lights are shown on my post midway on page 50 of this Gardening thread.

 

Not sure how to link to it.

 

dcarch

Are these cobs dimmable?

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40 minutes ago, KennethT said:

Are these cobs dimmable?

 

All LEDs require a minimum voltage to fire. Therefore no LEDs can be dimmed like incandescent bulbs.

That said, COB LEDs can be dimmed to some degree. down to 30%? Not sure.

 

dcarch

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1 hour ago, dcarch said:

 

All LEDs require a minimum voltage to fire. Therefore no LEDs can be dimmed like incandescent bulbs.

That said, COB LEDs can be dimmed to some degree. down to 30%? Not sure.

 

dcarch

Not necessarily. It depends on the driver. I can dim my Fluence light down to 10% or maybe lower (I haven't tried less than 10%).

 

ETA: LEDs brightness is actually dependent on the current flowing through it, not the voltage across it.  The voltage drop across the LED is pretty constant (and you're right, there is a minimum voltage below which it won't turn on), but the driver varies the brightness by shoving different amounts of current through it, not varying the voltage across it.


Edited by KennethT (log)

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1 hour ago, KennethT said:

Not necessarily. It depends on the driver. I can dim my Fluence light down to 10% or maybe lower (I haven't tried less than 10%).

 

ETA: LEDs brightness is actually dependent on the current flowing through it, not the voltage across it.  The voltage drop across the LED is pretty constant (and you're right, there is a minimum voltage below which it won't turn on), but the driver varies the brightness by shoving different amounts of current through it, not varying the voltage across it.

 

 

Isn't it also true that the amount of current that can go thru a device will also be dependent on the R value, as well as voltage? You can take a 12v LED (or any light bulb for that matter) and hook it up to a 1000 amp 12v battery without burning out the LED. Yes, you can in fact vary the brightness of any bulb type by varying the currant at constant voltage using a PWM circuit design. That's one of the reasons why many LEDs flicker. 

 

dcarch

 

 

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, dcarch said:

 

Isn't it also true that the amount of current that can go thru a device will also be dependent on the R value, as well as voltage? You can take a 12v LED (or any light bulb for that matter) and hook it up to a 1000 amp 12v battery without burning out the LED. Yes, you can in fact vary the brightness of any bulb type by varying the currant at constant voltage using a PWM circuit design. That's one of the reasons why many LEDs flicker. 

 

dcarch

LEDs have a series resistance, but it's usually pretty negligible compared with other resistances in the circuit. You can find the internal resistance of an LED on the spec sheet.  You control how much current you drive through the LED by using an external resistor sized appropriately for the voltage applied across the series combination.  A 1000Ah battery just says what the battery is capable of delivering - but it is the load that determines how much current is drawn at any given moment.  If you put a 1 megaohm resistor across a 12V car battery, you will only draw .012 mA, but put a short across the terminals, you will draw so much current that it can weld the short to the terminals.  That's why you can safely touch both the + and - terminals of a car battery safely - body resistance is about 300ohms, so the most you would draw is 40mA which is not perceptible. So, LED drivers are basically a constant current source varying voltage across a resistance in series with the LED.  Varying the voltage across the series resistor varies the current that will flow through the LED.

 

Yes, you can dim an LED using PWM - but you shouldn't really notice any flicker as long as the switching frequency is high enough.  Most high quality LED drivers do much more than put a PWM voltage across the LED though, they are a constant current source.

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1 hour ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

If I wanted to safely sanitize the soil capsules for my Click & Grow, is there a way to do it?

 

I would use a solution of pure H2O2 as I described in a post above, or use a solution of a product called UC roots, which is hypochlorous acid derived from calcium hypochlorite.  But, I don't know if you really want to do that.  One of the reasons growing in soil works is because of beneficial bacteria and fungi living in the soil.  Sanitizing your soil will kill anything bad growing in it, but will also get rid of all the good, and will make it more difficult for future plants to use that soil, unless you add some compost (which is full of beneficial bacteria and fungi).

 

It might be better to use a product called Hygrozyme (or one of a bunch of similar products) which is an enzyme that breaks down cellulose.  So, a soak in that solution will do a good job of breaking down any remaining dead roots in the soil, and turn them into products that are good for future plants - plus the spaces left by the roots add aeration to the soil.  Then let it dry out which will get rid of anything anaerobic that could still be hanging around.

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While I was enjoying my evening shower I had a thought:  what about baking the soil capsules?  Or as Click & Grow calls them, Experimental Plant Pods?  There are no dead roots.  This is something close to synthetic soil formed to a frustrated cone.

 

What time/temperature destroys fungi responsible for damping off of seedlings?  Note we are talking about only a couple cubic inches of "soil".  My most recent pea seedlings were overwhelmed and destroyed by a white fungus.  As far as I can tell the pea plants turning brown was a different problem, which I believe was heat.

 

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I am still having to endure the ugly visuals of frost damage. The recent rains have prompted lots of new growth. The citrus (orange, kuquat and tangerine) are going nuts. Walking to the mailbox is almost overwhelmingly scented The herbs are showing off. I thank Lucy

(bleudauvergne) for opening my eyes to the power of winter light when she blogged - it is powerful

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8 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

While I was enjoying my evening shower I had a thought:  what about baking the soil capsules?  Or as Click & Grow calls them, Experimental Plant Pods?  There are no dead roots.  This is something close to synthetic soil formed to a frustrated cone.

 

What time/temperature destroys fungi responsible for damping off of seedlings?  Note we are talking about only a couple cubic inches of "soil".  My most recent pea seedlings were overwhelmed and destroyed by a white fungus.  As far as I can tell the pea plants turning brown was a different problem, which I believe was heat.

 

I was curious, so I checked out their website...

https://support.clickandgrow.com/hc/en-us/articles/360000947227-19-How-to-get-rid-of-mold-and-algae-

 

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General tip and FWIW,

If you're doing some sifting of soil, peat, compost or whatever for making your own mixes or whatever.

I strongly recommend the gold classifying sifters with stainless steel mesh...they come in various mesh sizes (sets are available) and fit in the top of a 5 gallon pail.

1/4 inch being the most useful size, IMO.

SE GP2-14 Patented Stackable 13-1/4" Sifting Pan, 1/4" Mesh Screen

These are a MUCH better option than the ubiquitous bonsai sifters.

yes.gif

 

 

 

 

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~Martin :)

I try to find the good food in every situation!

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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