Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Gardening: (2016– )


Recommended Posts

Eaters, where do you grow your food? I'm interested in growing veggies like tomatoes, cucumbers, cabbage. Does anybody here uses greenhouse? Want to buy this one but I saw here that many of you just grow outside.
How much time does it takes you for gardening? 

Edited by Teronms (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Teronms said:

Eaters, where do you grow your food? I'm interested in growing veggies like tomatoes, cucumbers, cabbage. Does anybody here uses greenhouse? Want to buy one but I saw here that many of you just grow outside.
How much time does it takes you for gardening? 

Okay...as for a greenhouse, that's primarily a way to extend your season. If you're in a short-summer climate, or just plain want to garden for as long as possible, a greenhouse lets you start things earlier and keep them later. In summertime you basically open everything up lest the plants fry.

 

The time it takes is [x]. Gardens, like bills, have a way of expanding to absorb all of the resources you have at your disposal, and time is at the top of that list. You can certainly grow tomatoes and cukes with minimal effort (climate permitting), and get enough of them to feel that you haven't wasted your time. The bigger your ambitions, the more time, effort and money you'll need to invest. You can certainly grow a worthwhile range and quantity of produce from even a small plot (look up "square foot gardening" for one approach). It's smarter to start small and build, than to dive in headlong and find yourself overwhelmed and exhausted.

 

You'll need a spot that gets a lot of sunlight, though late-afternoon shade can benefit some plants (like lettuces) that do best in the cool months. Ideally the soil will be loose and well-drained, which is achievable through various amendments if your current soil is poor. Alternatively, you could buy or build a raised bed and fill it with decent-quality soil, then maintain it over the years with compost and such.

 

It's a big, BIG topic. There are lots of books out there offering guidance and advice, much of it conflicting ("Double dig your soil!" "No, don't till your soil at all!"). After a few seasons of trial and error you'll find a methodology you're comfortable with.

  • Like 2

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Teronms said:

Eaters, where do you grow your food? I'm interested in growing veggies like tomatoes, cucumbers, cabbage. Does anybody here uses greenhouse? Want to buy one but I saw here that many of you just grow outside.
How much time does it takes you for gardening? 

Its a big world - where  in it do you liove? @chromedome makes excellent points

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your growing zone is so important. 

 

Best to Google, 'gardening 101', or 'first garden'---lots of key words to use. Youtube, or a good book like, Organic Gardening

 

I used Rhodale's two volumes, vegetables and herbs, hard copies, 30 years ago and their magazine before the internet. Covers all the basics. 

Many gardening forums have primer 'stickies' for first gardens. Best to read and learn and plan for next year. 

Or start a small garden as a trial but most plants are well on their way by this point--this year. Or on their way out in southern states. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

35 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Or ask at your library.

 

Yes and I am a fan of supporting Independent Garden Centers (verus big box stores). They generally have trained employees who can guide you, are familiar with the locale, and often have no or low cost classes. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, thank you for the replies. I just wanted to think about starting a garden and I saw that a lot of members have their owns. I heard that growing vegetables in the greenhouse is easier that just outside that's why I had my question. I understand that I need to learn more before starting a garden, appreciate your help

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Teronms said:

Oh, thank you for the replies. I just wanted to think about starting a garden and I saw that a lot of members have their owns. I heard that growing vegetables in the greenhouse is easier that just outside that's why I had my question. I understand that I need to learn more before starting a garden, appreciate your help

Greenhouse growing does provide a controllable growing environment, and enables year-round production, but there's a significant learning curve involved, and a significant financial investment, as well. It's more often done on a commercial scale, but certainly a motivated home gardener can do it to.

 

Outdoor growing is a lower-stakes option for most beginners, unless you're in a really marginal climate.

  • Like 1

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@Teronms, I use what is possibly the easiest form of gardening — raised beds. The beds are made of 2 x 12s made into a 4 x 8  box, open bottom, that sits on the ground. Several layers of newspaper go in the bottom, and they’re filled with a 50-50 mix of topsoil and compost. Initial investment to get beds built and filled was probably $500 (I have five of them now, one of which is a cold frame). I grow tomatoes, squash, zucchini and cucumbers. Usually have enough tomatoes to can.

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, Teronms said:

Oh, thank you for the replies. I just wanted to think about starting a garden and I saw that a lot of members have their owns. I heard that growing vegetables in the greenhouse is easier that just outside that's why I had my question. I understand that I need to learn more before starting a garden, appreciate your help

The only real problem with greenhouse growing is the insect issue. It's very hard to control white fly or other more destructive insects indoors than it usually is when plants are grown outdoors. Or at least that was the case when I lived in Colorado. The cold winters (or what used to be cold winters) helped keep down the populations, but in a greenhouse the climate is quite different. I am looking for a small greenhouse to use here in Pátzcuaro, not to protect plants from frost but to protect them from the torrential rain in the summer. Turns plants to black mush, which is very discouraging.

 

I would encourage you to start small--grow a tomato or 2, zucchini, green beans, etc. Nothing exotic or difficult. Start with improving your soil and go from there. If you live somewhere with an extension service (US Dept. of Agriculture offices), they can be very helpful. Check with your county or state government to find them. I don't know what resources are available in other countries, though.

 

Have fun with it! That's not the whole idea of it, but it sure helps. Any food you harvest is a bonus.

  • Like 1

Formerly "Nancy in CO"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I needed to repot my lemongrass plant - it was completely root bound. It took hours of sweaty back breaking work to get them apart. Fingers crossed!!!!!

 

PXL_20220619_234200732.thumb.jpg.f40398a0734a999a5a2b09af42915d95.jpg

This is after thinning and repotting.

 

PXL_20220619_231739107.thumb.jpg.661aa379a9a5022f8a84c83e1fe39775.jpg

This is what was leftover!!!

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can you freeze lemon grass? Or is there another way to preserve it? Of course with the plant(s) you have separated you probably won't need to preserve anything. Or give them away. I just dug up (or rather, our gardener did) a bed of agapanthus that had become too crowded and as a result had stopped blooming. Took out 4 dozen clumps, which I will give away. I think they were white, but I'm not sure.

Formerly "Nancy in CO"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Nancy in Pátzcuaro said:

Can you freeze lemon grass? Or is there another way to preserve it? Of course with the plant(s) you have separated you probably won't need to preserve anything. Or give them away. I just dug up (or rather, our gardener did) a bed of agapanthus that had become too crowded and as a result had stopped blooming. Took out 4 dozen clumps, which I will give away. I think they were white, but I'm not sure.

I think you can freeze it, but I've never done it myself.  I usually only harvest a stalk or two at a time (whatever I need) and leave the rest growing.  That's probably how I wound up with so much!  I wound up giving a small amount to a friend who lives in the building who will plant them for herself, the rest I'm giving to a local SE Asian bakery in exchange for a bottle of their homemade sambal (which uses the lemongrass).

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Nancy in Pátzcuaro said:

Can you freeze lemon grass? Or is there another way to preserve it? Of course with the plant(s) you have separated you probably won't need to preserve anything. Or give them away. I just dug up (or rather, our gardener did) a bed of agapanthus that had become too crowded and as a result had stopped blooming. Took out 4 dozen clumps, which I will give away. I think they were white, but I'm not sure.

Yes it freezes well for me as it is tough and the cell walls don't go mush. As to the blasted agapanthus - I've never had it stop blooming. On a food note it is a major snail attractant for those that like DIY escargot.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, Shelby said:

Started harvesting our wheat a couple of hours ago!!!!  Even after all these years I love it.  

 

Kansas proud :) 

Any pics? Field, machinery, process?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, heidih said:

Any pics? Field, machinery, process?

I should go out and do that but the wheat dust is O M G killing me even inside.... I did post pics somewhere around here years ago.  I'll try to find them.

 

This is the first year we have two combines going at the same time so it's a lot faster than normal.  

 

The farmers--as you guys know--are Mennonites.  Just the nicest people.  We have a great relationship.  When they harvest they pile a ton of their kids in the cab of the combine (now air conditioned).  SO cute.

 

One of my favorite times of year.   

 

 

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

@Shelby Oh I totally get you on dust in the air. Don't risk it. Thanks for that shot. Your Mennonite comment with the kids reminds me of an interview Ed Levine (Serious Eats) did with Rodney Scott the South Carolina whole hog BBQ master about growing up on the farm. Tobacco? Great story. Ddad putting him up in tractor at very young age. He could not reach pedal or gear shift but he learned to drive the row straight. Dad would meet him on other end andg et him turned as needed to keep on going. Those farm kids learn a lot of early significant lessons.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

@Shelby, in Kansas, do y’all refer to soybeans planted after wheat as “wheat beans”? I’ve used the term around people unfamiliar with farming and gotten puzzled looks.

 

I assume, too, the beans are no-till, as there wasn’t any wheat stubble burning or turning under going on. Down here, farmers usually burn off the fields (smoke clouds drifting across the highway will cause at least one major traffic accident a year) and then disk before replanting.

 

I also have picked up the regional argot of having X many acres planted to (crop), as opposed to having (crop) planted on X many acres.

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

289273700_569820798047607_2799236536125990294_n.jpg.c91dfb038fa0cbe3d3b5d1b74889758c.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 1

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Shelby said:

They aren't messin' around. 

 

All the wheat is at the Coop ready for us to sell and they are planting soybeans as we speak :) 

So you have Mennonites farming your land?  Very interesting.  Do they have a flat rate cost based on time, do they take a cut of the haul...or?

 

They are sure hard working folk!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 6/20/2022 at 11:36 AM, KennethT said:

I needed to repot my lemongrass plant - it was completely root bound. It took hours of sweaty back breaking work to get them apart. Fingers crossed!!!!!

 

Speaking of root bound. I have a dwarf lime that will actually set fruit but they remain tiny. Someone at the farmers market suggested that it might be root bound. Yeah, it had been in the same pot for 5 or more years. I nervously coaxed it out of the pot because it was in the best terracotta pot I ever made. But it came out well. I trimmed the roots around the edges, thinned the branches, and took off most of the limes. Put it in a half wine barrel. We shall see.

 

image.thumb.jpeg.970a84aad6e34fcaf174930ac712ea98.jpeg

image.thumb.jpeg.03d626ebf9e4780e7a994ae045b35f3d.jpeg

  • Like 9

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...