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Nancy in Pátzcuaro

Gardening: (2016– )

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On 1/23/2019 at 8:49 PM, Smithy said:

I love nasturtiums. Unfortunately, they don't do well in our climate...except, possibly, for the very dedicated gardeners in my area. I am not one of those, at present. But they are delightful to look at and a nicely versatile table addition.

 

I like nasturtiums as well. I used to make infused vinegar with the flowers and leaves. The colour of the vinegar was lovely, nice to use in vinaigrette. I like the idea of the nasturtium butter at the same link, though I have not tried it myself. 

http://therunawayspoon.com/blog/2011/06/nasturtium-butter-and-nasturtium-vinegar/

 

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On 2/1/2019 at 10:39 AM, DiggingDogFarm said:

Waiting on the Miracle-Gro. It should be here early next week.

The shed door is frozen shut, so I can't get to the air tubing!!! :angry:

High temperature of 53° is forecast for Monday—so I should be able to get into the shed before I receive the Miracle-Gro. yes.gif

 

The Miracle-Gro arrived and the shed door opened! yes.gif


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)
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5 hours ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

FWIW,

Here Dr. Carolyn discusses her and Dr. Craig's experiences in reviving very old seed.

The reason I'm being extra careful in attempting to germinate the above mentioned seeds is that, back in 2016, I sent 150 "Baby Pequin" seeds to a guy in Brooklyn, NY—he wasn't able to get any of them to germinate! shock2.gif

But I know nothing of his general prowess in germinating seeds.

 

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn...

 

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The hardy just grow  -----without intervention

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Been doing some experimenting with some new equipment as I get ready to try some new crops.... 

20190203_194542.thumb.jpg.502d0f0747f1ffcadaef798fab7b02a5.jpg

Capacitive moisture sensor

 

20190203_194611.thumb.jpg.7331d0058d7005511cee67d5bdb7664d.jpg

Buried in some soaked and drained coco coir.

 

You would think that it would have an extremely high moisture content - but coir has an amazing air holding capacity... The moisture content is just over 30%.

20190203_194806.thumb.jpg.6c9780f4f77b0b9f4ee2856131b15f30.jpg

 

ETA:  Whoops!!!!  I made a major math error in the coding of my controller which is providing those readouts....  Turns out that the humidity was more like 33% and the moisture was more like 82% - which is still good air holding capacity considering that it was completely saturated.


Edited by KennethT (log)
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On 10/20/2018 at 3:07 PM, robirdstx said:

2D7B8F7C-39EF-421B-9210-6823D81FB567.thumb.jpeg.7c51d502dfb043b9bda177c24bc184b8.jpeg

 

I had prepared this bed for planting last Spring, but the weather, travel and life interrupted my plans. So, today I finally planted the bed with the lettuce, spinach and radish seeds I had intended to plant last Spring.

 

 

Didn’t see much going on until recently. Must have had slow growing varieties! 😁 But now I seem to have a jump on Spring!

 

0E8AA219-A75A-46C6-9A00-79EE7B1BC19D.thumb.jpeg.b0e0ed804027e83d267b8bfb97ba71b0.jpeg

 

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10 hours ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

I'm TOTALLY lost when it comes to hydroponics! confused1.gif

Yields and flavor are amazing when it's done right... it's not the cheapest (especially as a small home hobby gardener) and especially compared with plunking stuff in the ground, but for me, growing indoors, it's the best - I never worry about soil borne diseases or pests and I have much more control over the health and nutrition of my plants... and you get huge yields (so your cost per harvest weight comes down), mainly due to the plant having everything it needs whenever it needs it, the consistent growing environment and lots of oxygen for the roots.

 

If you're interested, there's tons of info on the web... some great, some not so good...

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35 minutes ago, KennethT said:

Yields and flavor are amazing when it's done right... it's not the cheapest (especially as a small home hobby gardener) and especially compared with plunking stuff in the ground, but for me, growing indoors, it's the best - I never worry about soil borne diseases or pests and I have much more control over the health and nutrition of my plants... and you get huge yields (so your cost per harvest weight comes down), mainly due to the plant having everything it needs whenever it needs it, the consistent growing environment and lots of oxygen for the roots.

 

If you're interested, there's tons of info on the web... some great, some not so good...

 

Once upon a time, I grew carnivorous plants.

I'm not against growing them again—hydroponically.

But we don't have the room, and I'm dirt poor.

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6 hours ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

 

Once upon a time, I grew carnivorous plants.

I'm not against growing them again—hydroponically.

But we don't have the room, and I'm dirt poor.

 

Grow hydroponically, save your dirt!  I too grew carnivorous plants, hasn't everyone?

 

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28 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

I too grew carnivorous plants, hasn't everyone?

 

I'm the only person in my family who's grown them.

 

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Is there a purpose to growing carniverous plants, more than just the fun or novelty of it?  I know very little about them, other than the fact that they are carniverous, as the name implies.  Do they get all of their nutrients from their digestion, or do they need some from roots as well?

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2 minutes ago, KennethT said:

Is there a purpose to growing carniverous plants, more than just the fun or novelty of it?  I know very little about them, other than the fact that they are carniverous, as the name implies.  Do they get all of their nutrients from their digestion, or do they need some from roots as well?

 

I suppose if you were a murderer looking to dispose a body...other than that, fun and novelty when you are 12 years old and reading Darwin.

 

http://amzn.com/B00086TPX4

 

As I recall they get mainly nitrogen from digestion.

 

 

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My local 99cent store had carnivorous plants for a hile. I'd place them net to the fruit bowl. Lovely symbiotic relationship. (fruit gnats)

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I think pitcher plants do well hydroponically. I'm not sure about others.

I grew several different types when I was a teenager.

I bought from a nursery exclusively devoted to carnivorous plants.

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The pitcher plant is Newfoundland's official flower.

 

Which, I suppose, tells you everything you need to know about the province's population of stinging and biting insects.

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On 2/4/2019 at 11:51 AM, KennethT said:

Been doing some experimenting with some new equipment as I get ready to try some new crops.... 

20190203_194542.thumb.jpg.502d0f0747f1ffcadaef798fab7b02a5.jpg

Capacitive moisture sensor

 

20190203_194611.thumb.jpg.7331d0058d7005511cee67d5bdb7664d.jpg

Buried in some soaked and drained coco coir.

 

You would think that it would have an extremely high moisture content - but coir has an amazing air holding capacity... The moisture content is just over 30%.

20190203_194806.thumb.jpg.6c9780f4f77b0b9f4ee2856131b15f30.jpg

 

ETA:  Whoops!!!!  I made a major math error in the coding of my controller which is providing those readouts....  Turns out that the humidity was more like 33% and the moisture was more like 82% - which is still good air holding capacity considering that it was completely saturated.

 

 

I've been looking into Arduino recently. A person I know programmed all his father's garden beds with moisture sensors and irrigation control valves.

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My curry leaf tree. I have to keep it in the car port during winter. It was a nicer shape until an apprentice dropped his ladder on it when he was servicing my evaporative cooler. Luckily he didn't break any pots or I would have left the kid up there.

20190126_083659.thumb.jpg.62d58281e416b8c9f6346c67894b74e5.jpg

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23 hours ago, KennethT said:

Yields and flavor are amazing when it's done right... it's not the cheapest (especially as a small home hobby gardener) and especially compared with plunking stuff in the ground, but for me, growing indoors, it's the best - I never worry about soil borne diseases or pests and I have much more control over the health and nutrition of my plants... and you get huge yields (so your cost per harvest weight comes down), mainly due to the plant having everything it needs whenever it needs it, the consistent growing environment and lots of oxygen for the roots.

 

If you're interested, there's tons of info on the web... some great, some not so good...

 

While I agree with you on most points here, especially yields and ability to control the environment - I have to disagree with you on the flavour topic.

 

There are certain flavours one cannot get without soil.  Especially healthy (ideally, 'living') organic soil.

 

One a separate topic - I am curious as to suggestions of when I should start my seeds for our outdoor garden (first year doing so, we live in Southern Ontario)...

 

 

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2 minutes ago, TicTac said:

 

While I agree with you on most points here, especially yields and ability to control the environment - I have to disagree with you on the flavour topic.

 

There are certain flavours one cannot get without soil.  Especially healthy (ideally, 'living') organic soil.

 

One a separate topic - I am curious as to suggestions of when I should start my seeds for our outdoor garden (first year doing so, we live in Southern Ontario)...

 

 

That's why I said "when done right"... many hydro growers optimize for yield, not for flavor.  The biggest problem with greenhouse grown hydro crops is the genetics they use.  The best heirloom tomatoes would have a relatively low yield in a greenhouse, and would be at high risk for mold, rot and pests.  Greenhouse growers have much higher costs than field growers, so they need to have high yields to make it pay.  I grew a Goose Creek heirloom tomato plant in my living room - it gave the best tomatoes that I (or anyone else who tried them) had ever tasted... but I lost usually half my crop to blossom end rot, which is not atypical for heirlooms grown indoors.  Most greenhouses grow hybrids that compromise flavor for disease, salt and pest resistance.

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5 hours ago, haresfur said:

My curry leaf tree. I have to keep it in the car port during winter. It was a nicer shape until an apprentice dropped his ladder on it when he was servicing my evaporative cooler. Luckily he didn't break any pots or I would have left the kid up there.

20190126_083659.thumb.jpg.62d58281e416b8c9f6346c67894b74e5.jpg

This is amazing.. now you have me wanting to grow a curry tree!!!  How did you start yours?  I've heard that you can root a branch pretty easily, but have never tried...  How old is this one by now?

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5 hours ago, haresfur said:

 

I've been looking into Arduino recently. A person I know programmed all his father's garden beds with moisture sensors and irrigation control valves.

They're very convenient.  Many years ago, you'd have to spend $1000 to get an industrial controller... now you can have most of the functionality for $20, and it's much easier to program than the industrial stuff.

 

Using sensors and controllers can save a lot of money and water over time - many people needlessly water based on a clock schedule.

 

I was reading an article about new high tech farming techniques (for outdoor farms, not indoor).  Many farms now used enhanced GPS and sensors to be able to robotically drive tractors and deliver fertilizer only where needed.   A lot of fertilizer is wasted by mistakenly spraying the same area repeatedly as the tractor makes its rounds, and some areas don't get any at all.  The new system winds up using a lot less fertilizer and has a much more even application for healthier crops.

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My GF's dad, a retired air force technician, has been occupying himself for the past two winters by building an Arduino/GPS-based autopilot for his sailboat. It's a remarkably versatile platform.

 

(He may never finish it, and may not be able to sail his boat anymore by the time it's done, but that's not the point...)

 

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4 hours ago, TicTac said:

One a separate topic - I am curious as to suggestions of when I should start my seeds for our outdoor garden (first year doing so, we live in Southern Ontario)...

 

 

Margaret is in upstate New York. I trust her. https://awaytogarden.com/when-to-start-seeds-calculator/


Edited by heidih (log)

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That's useful.

I had a worksheet that's very similar when my website was up and running.

I'm in the process of relaunching the website, but it'll be a while.

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