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Nancy in Pátzcuaro

Gardening: (2016– )

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We had a few days' serious thaw, so unexpectedly I was able to get one more harvest out of my garden (we'd been in the deep freeze 10 days ago, and I wasn't sure I'd get another opportunity).

 

I managed one more mess o' greens, mostly hardy brassicas with a bit of dandelion. The beets I'd planted late - mostly for greens - gave me about a dozen golden beets (an early variety, Golden Grex..the extra-dark Bull's Blood, not an early variety, didn't give me anything but greens in the limited time I had). To my surprise I also got the other half of my red onions, which I'd assumed would be a write off. I'd gambled on leaving them in the ground for another week or two, and then the hard freeze intervened.

 

My indoor lettuces and kale look like they'll do well in their current location (on a windowsill in our exercise room, where they get more light) so I'll have something fresh to look forward to after the holidays.

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I'm chuffed about this. I managed to get a bullhorn pepper to overwinter by putting it under the eve of the house to protect it from the frost. The leaves look a bit sad but it has peppers.

 

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Peppers have spunk. Maybe its the Capsaicin

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On 12/3/2018 at 6:21 PM, JoNorvelleWalker said:

All I have to look forward to is the Burpee catalog.

 

My Baker's Seeds came the other day. now I am dreaming of what I can put into my 4x5 gardening space.  

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The Plot Thickens!

 

Went to the town compost center and got six garbage bins of free compost. 6 x 60 gallons.

Tilted into my plot. Too much compost! the plot is now 7 inches thicker.

 

It will be a good tomato year!

 

dcarch

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I'm terrible at growing coriander leaf, aka cilantro. What I did get before it bolted was pretty tasteless. I did manage to use some of the root in Thai food and now have some coriander seed.

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coriander, aka cilantro, is really tricky to grow so don't beat yourself up!  Just look at it wrong and it bolts!

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"Starting a vegetable garden doesn't mean replicating the entire veggie section at the grocery store. Pick and choose to grow what you eat the most of, what's expensive to buy at the store, and what grows well in your area."

Good advice.

Common sense, really.

"Thinking About Starting A Vegetable Garden? Read This First." By Michael Weishan.

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Pretty much how I prioritize. Except I always plant a few potatoes, despite their year-round cheapness and availability, because I like new baby potatoes fresh from the garden (and those, of course, are also pricey by potato standards).

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There's nothing quite as good as going out in the early evening to dig up a couple of russet potatoes from their (sandy) bed in the garden. Fresh, fluffy, completely unlike any baked potato I'd ever eaten. As I recall I grew the Kennebeck (?) variety--it was a very long time ago and I don't really remember the name. Now, of course, I don't garden at all, and only one or two puestos (stalls) in the mercado have baking potatoes. Not the same, sad to say.

 

Nancy in Pátzcuaro

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I could not agree more about home grown potatoes no matter the variety.  They are so superior to store bought even after they have been in the root cellar for a few weeks.  We have two beds that we alternate planting potatoes each year.  All our good friends get a bag of freshly dug potatoes.

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Posted (edited)
41 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

They are so superior to store bought even after they have been in the root cellar for a few weeks.

 

So true!

When I was growing potatoes—Chieftain was our work-horse potato and the cultivar we grew most.

Perfect for our terroir.

One droughty year when I had to regularly carry water, by hand, to the plants—a LOT of water over nearly the entire summer—we harvested many tubers that were well over 6 inches long (with excellent flavor.)

Chieftains aren't usually that HUGE!

Some folks say that Chieftains aren't suitable for fries—but it's all in the technique.

They can produce excellent fries via the double-fry method.


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)
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2 hours ago, chromedome said:

I like new baby potatoes fresh from the garden (and those, of course, are also pricey by potato standards).

 

Yes, bite-size 'salt potatoes' are a big deal in this region.

The best are home-grown.

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I'm Irish. I love anything one can do to or with a potato. But I think my favorite is "new potatoes," dug that day, unpeeled, scrubbed with a brush, boiled in salted water, drenched with plenty of butter.

 

Best reason to grow your own.

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Need to get the tent cleaned up for a new season.... As I was cleaning, I was reminded how it would have been SO much better to have done this a lot earlier - like as soon as I harvested my plants!20190113_105240_HDR.thumb.jpg.4e21b1751c0c1ab0a8f899bcda107fa7.jpg

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@KennethT

 

 Nice to know you’re human like the rest of us.:smile:

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Yes my deep potato memory is the one time as a young child we grew them. Those spectaular nuggets are my gold standard. 

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Seed orders...

I'll be ordering from a few different vendors this year.

I think I have the Fedco Seeds order nearly complete.

 

204PR Provider Bush Green Bean

3866 Matchbox Hot Pepper—I love this little pepper! :)

3099 Sea Kale Perennial  (If Available) An amazing plant!
1239LO Little Leaf H-19 Pickling Cucumber
1243MG Mexican Sour Gherkin Specialty Cucumber
318SR Scarlet Runner Pole Bean
798LG Gard-N Combination Legume Inoculant
2301AR Arat Root Parsley
2590CM Caucasian Mountain Perennial Spinach (Hablitzia Tamnoides) I wish they wouldn't call it 'spinach!' GRRRrrr!!! :angry:
3034PS Perpetual Spinach Chard (Leaf Beet) Also NOT a spinach!
3096KH Good King Henry (If Available)
4225 Mountain Magic Small-Fruited Tomato (Maybe—a BIG maybe!)

 

$30 and above orders ship free.

 

What are you ordering this year?

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Mountain Magic has been my goto tomato for several years.  No question there!  But consider the economics.  Seeds are so expensive there is no reason not to buy plants.  I get mine from Burpee.

 

I hope also to find a Ramapo plant, or I may tackle them from seed.  Not something Burpee caries.

 

Recently I have been growing Kelvedon Wonder peas from Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds, a variety Nigel Slater recommends.

 

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20 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Mountain Magic has been my goto tomato for several years.  No question there!  But consider the economics.  Seeds are so expensive...

 

Yes they are expensive. :wacko:

 

I love peas, but too much sugar! :(

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1 hour ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

 

Yes they are expensive. :wacko:

 

I love peas, but too much sugar! :(

 

But at least here the Mountain Magic plants cost no more than other varieties.

 

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10 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Mountain Magic has been my goto tomato for several years.  No question there!  But consider the economics.  Seeds are so expensive there is no reason not to buy plants.  I get mine from Burpee.

 

I hope also to find a Ramapo plant, or I may tackle them from seed.  Not something Burpee caries.

 

 

Rutgers has some interesting tomato seed varieties that can be ordered online, including Ramapo.

https://breeding.rutgers.edu/tomato-availability/

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3 hours ago, heidih said:

On line (think Kenneth T in New York has ordered) is my local tomato person Laurel . The Berkeley Tie Dye was amazing one year. https://www.heirloomtomatoplants.com/

 

Yep. That was me.  I haven't ordered from them in a long time, but when I did, they were great!

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