Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Nancy in Pátzcuaro

Gardening: (2016– )

Recommended Posts

This dwarf pear tree lost all it's blossoms to a late frost last year and the year before that, the deer ravaged it just before I was ready to pick. I plan on putting deer fence up this time and am hoping for better luck.

HC

IMG_0442.thumb.JPG.e2dfca2709de2d4fa2a727507f389627.JPG

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, HungryChris said:

This dwarf pear tree lost all it's blossoms to a late frost last year and the year before that, the deer ravaged it just before I was ready to pick. I plan on putting deer fence up this time and am hoping for better luck.

HC

IMG_0442.thumb.JPG.e2dfca2709de2d4fa2a727507f389627.JPG

 

Just a word to the wise -- if it looks like it's going to bear heavily, you may want to be prepared to prop up heavily-laden branches. We had a Pineapple Pear tree that regularly shed branches because they'd be so heavy they'd just split off from the truck. We'd prop them up with 2 x 4s, because those pears made the finest pear preserves going, and did NOT need to be wasted.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, kayb said:

 

Just a word to the wise -- if it looks like it's going to bear heavily, you may want to be prepared to prop up heavily-laden branches. We had a Pineapple Pear tree that regularly shed branches because they'd be so heavy they'd just split off from the truck. We'd prop them up with 2 x 4s, because those pears made the finest pear preserves going, and did NOT need to be wasted.

I honestly don't remember ever seeing so many blossoms on this tree ever before. Every spring, I try to identify second year branches as I understand that is where the blossoms will appear. It looks like I have done well this year.  I take your advice to heart and will watch it like a hawk.

HC

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, for sure, thin the potential fruit.  Being done here by hand on the apricot tress which are in blossom at the moment.  Apple thinning Is done by spraying a special chemical. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Apricot trees! Oh, lucky you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll be able to start planting in a few weeks' time, so I've got my seedlings started in the front porch. 

 

I was delighted to find that there's a variety of okra that grows well in our northerly climate (I can take their word for it, because the seed is grown locally as well). It's the Clemson Spineless 80, which I'm told produces lovely blossoms as a bonus. I wouldn't know, I've never seen okra growing. This will be the first time in many years that I've had a full-sized garden to work with (usually, if anything, I've had to content myself with a few herbs and lettuces artfully concealed in a flower bed). I'm rather looking forward to it. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Clemson spineless is good okra. When you pick it, it's a good idea to wear a long-sleeved shirt, as the leaves have a stickery "fuzz" on them that can make you itch something fierce. And like all okra, it has tough stems, so carry a knife or kitchen shears to cut it from the plant, rather than just pulling it.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

young okra leaves are edible.

 

dcarch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/21/2018 at 3:01 PM, dcarch said:

cow manure is grass without the beef.

 

Cattle manure can be MUCH more than grass.

In fact, grass often isn't a component.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2018-05-04 at 8:21 PM, Smithy said:

Apricot trees! Oh, lucky you!

The trees are not mine.  There is an apricot block on our street.  A block being two acres.  We live in fruit and wine country.  Those are commercial fruit so we don’t get any but we have several friends with trees so there never any shortage.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember thumbing through the Okanagan on my way to Vancouver for the first time, back in the early 80s. One of my rides gifted me with a box of the biggest, ripest, juiciest peaches I'd ever seen in my life. You couldn't eat one without juice up to your elbows, it was ridiculous (in a good way, I hasten to point out). 

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been in the garden since 8:45 this morning.  It's now 1:30.  Like @kayb I am one tired, sore person.

 

I weeded the potato patch and the onions.  That took forever.  

 

Planted:

 

33 tomato plants (about that many more in the greenhouse that will be ready at the end of the week--so around 60 total this year)

100 seeds of corn (new variety this year called Nirvana--with a name like that, how could it be bad?)

3  rows of lettuce

7 rows of beans

4 yellow squash (probably do 4 zucchini later this week)

4 rows of okra

3 hills of watermelon

2 cucumber plants (will get more from the nursery this week)

6 jalapeno plants

3 bell plants (sorry @rotuts just scroll on by this part)

3 banana pepper plants

3 poblano pepper plants

 

Will get a couple eggplant plants this week.

 

I need a shower.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, Shelby said:

I've been in the garden since 8:45 this morning.  It's now 1:30.  Like @kayb I am one tired, sore person.

 

I weeded the potato patch and the onions.  That took forever.  

 

Planted:

 

33 tomato plants (about that many more in the greenhouse that will be ready at the end of the week--so around 60 total this year)

100 seeds of corn (new variety this year called Nirvana--with a name like that, how could it be bad?)

3  rows of lettuce

7 rows of beans

4 yellow squash (probably do 4 zucchini later this week)

4 rows of okra

3 hills of watermelon

2 cucumber plants (will get more from the nursery this week)

6 jalapeno plants

3 bell plants (sorry @rotuts just scroll on by this part)

3 banana pepper plants

3 poblano pepper plants

 

Will get a couple eggplant plants this week.

 

I need a shower.

 

You put me to shame. I still have the raised beds to do, and the seed garden needs hoeing, but before that, the hoe needs sharpening, and before that, this twingy muscle in my back needs to quit.

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Shelby said:

I've been in the garden since 8:45 this morning.  It's now 1:30.  Like @kayb I am one tired, sore person.

 

Go take a  bath. You are filthy and stinky. I can smell you all the way here in NY. xD xD xD

I just came in the house to change for some dry underwear, for the fourth time. Looking at the weather report, I need to get the work done as much as I can today.

 

A couple more hours of digging, then call pizza. A long bath and many cold beers for me.

 

dcarch

 


Edited by dcarch (log)
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, kayb said:

 

You put me to shame. I still have the raised beds to do, and the seed garden needs hoeing, but before that, the hoe needs sharpening, and before that, this twingy muscle in my back needs to quit.

 

Nah, you have done a TON of work!

 

I have a twinge going on, too.  I am hoping this glass of wine calms it down.

21 minutes ago, dcarch said:

 

Go take a  bath. You are filthy and stinky. I can smell you all the way here in NY. xD xD xD

I just came in the house to change for some dry underwear, for the fourth time. Looking at the weather report, I need to get the work done as much as I can today.

 

A couple more hours of digging, then call pizza. A long bath and many cold beers for me.

 

dcarch

 

 

I guarantee you could smell me up there.  I was RIPE.

 

 

Oh how I wish I could call in a pizza.  That sounds SO good.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just finished adding a LCD and some buttons to my farden controller. Now I can check the temp, humidity and CO2 concentration from outside the tent without plugging in a computer.

20180512_190230.thumb.jpg.d35135b66084e83af7b9825f24ec1c11.jpg

20180512_190321.thumb.jpg.5f8fbf307b45f8393495d0bd28cc1930.jpg

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Planted more yesterday.  

 

2 eggplant

2 basil

5 more cucumbers

35 or so tomatoes

 

Then I weeded.  Have I mentioned how much I hate weeding lol.

 

The corn, okra and beans are all poking through the ground.....they germinated very quickly this year.  The soil must have been at optimal temps.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well....today, my daughters limed my garden and hubby just plowed it! YAY!     My seeds arrive tomorrow. I can't do anything until June because of the frost...but I can plan! .....  And, it will give this *#!@$%^& knee time to heal. ( I'm in a lot of pain at the moment, and quite angry about this injury.)

IMG_2654.JPG

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Went out early and weeded about two bushels of crabgrass and johnson grass out of the garden and got some fertilizer on the tomatoes before the rain chased me inside. Determined I do not have a hoe sharp enough to cut the bermuda in the garden, where it seems to grow MUCH better than it does in the yard. 

 

Everything seems to be coming along apace. Need to get some okra in. Two rows of pole beans and a row of bush limas are growing nicely, as are the melons, carrots, cabbages, radishes, squash and cucumbers. I've lost one tomato; the other 14 look great. 

 

Out front, the mint is doing the mint thing; will be making some mint chutney soon to get rid of some of it. Sage, thyme and oregano are prolific, as is tarragon. Basil is slow, and the cilantro and parsley did not take hold and need to be replanted. Still don't have the raised beds in; it's at the point of being too late now, although as long as the growing season's been the last couple of years, I could probably still get a year's growth in.

 

I didn't plant lettuces this year. Heresy, I know. Not a huge salad eater.

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, kayb said:

Went out early and weeded about two bushels of crabgrass and johnson grass out of the garden and got some fertilizer on the tomatoes before the rain chased me inside. Determined I do not have a hoe sharp enough to cut the bermuda in the garden, where it seems to grow MUCH better than it does in the yard. 

 

Everything seems to be coming along apace. Need to get some okra in. Two rows of pole beans and a row of bush limas are growing nicely, as are the melons, carrots, cabbages, radishes, squash and cucumbers. I've lost one tomato; the other 14 look great. 

 

Out front, the mint is doing the mint thing; will be making some mint chutney soon to get rid of some of it. Sage, thyme and oregano are prolific, as is tarragon. Basil is slow, and the cilantro and parsley did not take hold and need to be replanted. Still don't have the raised beds in; it's at the point of being too late now, although as long as the growing season's been the last couple of years, I could probably still get a year's growth in.

 

I didn't plant lettuces this year. Heresy, I know. Not a huge salad eater.

 

Oh good job!!!!  I truly know how hard it is to keep up with the weeding.  And yeah, the damn bermuda does awesome in the middle of the garden sigh.

 

I need to get out there.  I weeded Tuesday morning, but it's already needing it again--this poison ivy is in a spot on my leg that makes bending over and weeding extremely uncomfortable.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Other than for aesthetic reasons, I have not found most weeds to be that detrimental to  garden productivity.

 

This year's weeds are next years tomatoes. More compost, weeds improve soil.

 

dcarch

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, dcarch said:

Other than for aesthetic reasons, I have not found most weeds to be that detrimental to  garden productivity.

 

This year's weeds are next years tomatoes. More compost, weeds improve soil.

 

dcarch

I like your way of thinking....

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, dcarch said:

Other than for aesthetic reasons, I have not found most weeds to be that detrimental to  garden productivity.

 

This year's weeds are next years tomatoes. More compost, weeds improve soil.

 

dcarch

 

It's kinda like pink pork. I can hear my father tsk-tsk-ing at me from beyond the pale.

 

I'm contemplating trying the black plastic method next year. I know people have had success with it, and it helps the soil warm up earlier so you can plant a little earlier, a significant thing of late as spring has gotten later and later.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, kayb said:

------

I'm contemplating trying the black plastic method next year. I know people have had success with it,-----------

 

 

Or this:

 

dcarch

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I got my tomatoes in.  Only vegetables this year.

 

Edit:  this could be ambiguous.  Tomatoes (Atlas, Mountain Magic, Ramapo) are my only vegetables this year.

 


Edited by JoNorvelleWalker linguistics (log)
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   1 member

×