Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Superhot peppers can do more than make you sweat


Anna N
 Share

Recommended Posts

Click

 

 Man suffers hole in his oesophagus from eating a ghost pepper purée on a hamburger. 

  • Like 3

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anything can happen, can't rule out the possibility. But one or two cases of something severe happening out of the thousands who eat this sort of thing all the time with no troubles doesn't incite me to worry. Thousands of people ride bikes every day but the news articles only talk about the one or two that get hit by a car or something. I keep riding. I've been eating superhot peppers, purees and sauces for years with no troubles worse than fearing the next day's morning constitutional when the plumbing starts moving. The thing about the superhot varieties is, if you can handle the fire, some of them have a really nice, fruity flavor that I haven't found in any of the more tame varieties.

  • Like 3

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Sounds like "I can eat the hottest thing on the menu" boast after a few cold ones.

 

I'll have to agree with @Tri2Cook on this one. I have been growing, cooking, preserving and eating hot peppers for many years and I've given up on explaining to friends and family who don't share my 'chili head' ways and can't/won't accept 'to each his own'.

 

I grew Bhut jolokia (ghost pepper) 3 years ago and, as with any new pepper, slowly worked out how to use it effectively. Making a mash and slathering it on a burger would have been the last thing I would have tried. Conclusion was it really only contributed heat and I'd be much better served growing peppers that contributed heat and flavour.

 

 

 

  • Like 2

I know it's stew. What KIND of stew?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I ate a whole roasted scorpion pepper accidently once.  I had two waves a gastric crisis.  that buckled me over.  Turned me white and thought I might get sick.

 

I had originally thought they were Habanero..  ooops

 

Tomato and Pepper soup

 

10313076206_a2192cf5ca_k.jpg

 

 

Its good to have Morels

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Paul Bacino said:

I ate a whole roasted scorpion pepper accidently once.  I had two waves a gastric crisis.  that buckled me over.  Turned me white and thought I might get sick.

 

I had originally thought they were Habanero..  ooops

 

Tomato and Pepper soup

 

 

 

 

Are you implying that you would eat a - whole - roasted - habanero!?

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, Tri2Cook said:

Anything can happen, can't rule out the possibility. But one or two cases of something severe happening out of the thousands who eat this sort of thing all the time with no troubles doesn't incite me to worry. Thousands of people ride bikes every day but the news articles only talk about the one or two that get hit by a car or something. I keep riding. I've been eating superhot peppers, purees and sauces for years with no troubles worse than fearing the next day's morning constitutional when the plumbing starts moving. The thing about the superhot varieties is, if you can handle the fire, some of them have a really nice, fruity flavor that I haven't found in any of the more tame varieties.

 

Agree on both counts.  Been riding for transportation my whole life and am over 200K miles.  Maybe I'll make a quarter-million if I don't get run over!  As for hot peppers, I've only developed a taste for them late in life but put them in anything I can.  Not only that, but they're supposed to be good for us as long as we don't overdo like a few have.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, TicTac said:

Are you implying that you would eat a - whole - roasted - habanero!?

 

 

 

I used to do a stuffed habanero appetizer. It sold pretty well. 

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sounds horrible, but I wonder what actually happened.  Was the tissue inflamed by the capsaicin then tore from the force of vomiting, or did the peppers actually burn a hole like a chemical burn?  Would he have been OK if not for the vomiting?  I do love spicy food, but don't need to prove anything by eating ghost peppers.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, chromedome said:

 

I used to do a stuffed habanero appetizer. It sold pretty well. 

 

I cannot imagine eating an entire habanero.

 

The immediate experience itself aside, the day(s) to follow would be hellish!

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

38 minutes ago, pastrygirl said:

Sounds horrible, but I wonder what actually happened.  Was the tissue inflamed by the capsaicin then tore from the force of vomiting, or did the peppers actually burn a hole like a chemical burn?  Would he have been OK if not for the vomiting?  I do love spicy food, but don't need to prove anything by eating ghost peppers.

 

As I read it, he tore a hole in his esophagus from vomiting. Presumably one might experience similarly evil effects from improperly-stored Thanksgiving leftovers, or a bottle or two of hooch. 

  • Like 1

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

50 minutes ago, chromedome said:

I used to do a stuffed habanero appetizer. It sold pretty well. 

 

38 minutes ago, TicTac said:

I cannot imagine eating an entire habanero.


Atomic Dragon Turds! Habaneros stuffed with cheese and/or meat, wrapped in bacon and grilled or smoked. Not nearly as deadly as it sounds. By the time you scoop out the innards, fill it with cheese and/or meat, baconate it and cook it, it's fire tames down quite a bit.

  • Like 1

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, I love the floral and/or vegetal notes of some peppers, and I enjoy the heat up to a limit. I do not have anything to prove either, and can't imagine intentionally subjecting myself to unpleasantness or pain.

 

I can get Habaneros and Scotch Bonnets sometimes, and some of your descriptions about stuffed ones have intrigued me. I would have dismissed them as too hot earlier. I will not be calling them by @Tri2Cook's colorful sobriquet. :) I will have to taste it first to see if it's appropriate to my husband's heat tolerance, and I strongly suspect it won't be.

 

The OP is very sad. I wish people (mostly men) would quit doing "food challenges". A ruptured esophagus is a danger bulimics face,  along with severe alcoholics and is often fatal. I hope the fellow is able to recover well.

  • Like 1

> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am reminded of a place I went with my dad and some friends in England, which clearly catered somewhat to the post-pub crowd and had a variety of sauces ranging from 'mild' to ones labeled 'blow your head off' which everyone was daring the others to try but no one was brave enough except my dad, who along with my mom is something of a chili-head. He put some of the 'blow your head off' on his food and tasted it. Then added more. Ate while everyone stared. Then he lined up all the sauces and tried a bit of each one - turned out the hottest sauce was actually labeled 'medium' and the ones above that in labeling were spicy, but less so. The 'blow your head off' was actually pretty mild as hot sauces go. We confirmed they were labeled the right way, yup.

 

i can only conclude this was a ruse adopted to deal with drunk idiots ribbing each other to consume ridiculous amounts of hot sauce, so as to avoid unpleasantness like people getting sick or causing trouble because their food was too hot. Seemed pretty clever to me. :D

 

(The 'blow your head off' was a bit more spicy than I like, because I am a wimp, but it did have a nice flavor. Better than the 'medium' which was just kind of blandly hot.)

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, TicTac said:

 

I cannot imagine eating an entire habanero.

 

The immediate experience itself aside, the day(s) to follow would be hellish!

 

 

 

Like eating beans, you build up to it. Back when I was eating hot chilies regularly, a habanero was no big deal. I likened it to meeting a stranger's large dog: No fear, as such, but a measure of respect. A Moruga Scorpion or a Carolina Reaper, now...those would be more akin to meeting a polar bear or a tiger. Major precautions required. 

 

I was eventually using roughly 1 habanero per cup of fresh salsa. I took some over to the neighbours' house one night, and still vividly remember the husband -- a drinker, and a very large man -- turning brick red and having to mop rivers of sweat from his brow. He didn't stop eating it, though. 

 

Life takes strange turns, sometimes. Those neighbours separated about six months before my wife died, and his former wife is now my girlfriend. 

  • Like 3

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Thanks for the Crepes said:

I will not be calling them by @Tri2Cook's colorful sobriquet. :)


Aww... come on. Look the hoity-toity folks right in the eye and say it with a big smile on your face as you serve them. :P Seriously though, that's not my name for them. As far as I know, that's what they're actually called. The same thing made with jalapenos is Atomic Buffalo Turds.

  • Like 2

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...