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blue_dolphin

Breakfast! 2016 (Part 3)

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This is the Pecan, Pepper Jelly and Stinky Cheese Panini from Deep Run Roots.

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Multi-grain bread, jalapeño-peach glaze (from the jalapeño-peach chicken recipe in the book, salt & butter roasted pecans, triple-creme brie substituted for the Époisses called for in the recipe.

I was tempted to add some blue cheese since the brie was super-rich but not particularly stinky.  I resisted, but will do it next time.

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17 hours ago, shain said:

Brunch: Omelette with dukkah; peas and bell pepper with scallions aniseed and dill; toast with white cheese and dukkah; a not big enough plate.

 

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@shain,

 

I like your breakfast a lot!

 

I was unfamiliar with dukkah, so Googled. If this version is anywhere near the authentic thing, I might even be able to get it here, along with a lot of others in the USA.

 

What do you think about their formulation? It also seems a bit pricey for what goes into it. Is that normal where you are? Perhaps you make your own and would share your ingredients and method? I would appreciate any thoughts you have on it.

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> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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1 hour ago, Thanks for the Crepes said:

 

@shain,

 

I like your breakfast a lot!

 

I was unfamiliar with dukkah, so Googled. If this version is anywhere near the authentic thing, I might even be able to get it here, along with a lot of others in the USA.

 

What do you think about their formulation? It also seems a bit pricey for what goes into it. Is that normal where you are? Perhaps you make your own and would share your ingredients and method? I would appreciate any thoughts you have on it.

 

There is no real recipe for dukkah, it changes from one region to next and from one family to another. Sesame, coriander are almost always included, and so does a nut of sorts, I use peanuts, but almonds, pistachios or hazelnuts should work as well. The other ingredients are some spices and salt. TJ's version seems to be quite high on the anise notes, I haven't had a version such as that, but it does sound good, and is definitely not inauthentic. 

 

My recipe is (roughly) as follows :

- 3 parts sesame 

- 1 part coriander seeds

- 1 part peanuts

- 1 part cumin seeds

- a little salt 

Toast the ingredients well in a pan or an oven until very aromatic, nutty and browned. Peanuts are best toasted independently or bought pre toasted (you can use slated peanuts  - just omit the salt from the recipe), they take longer to toast due to their size. For the same reason, the coriander is best placed in the pan a minute before the rest of the spices (cumin and sesame). Place the toasted ingredients and salt in a food processor and pulse to receive a somewhat coarse mill.

If you make a large amount, it is best stored in a fridge or freeze. 

It is great with breads or eggs. And I prefer to match it with browned butter, rather then olive oil. 

 

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~ Shai N.

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Thank @shain,

 

I'm sure I can make your version for less than $1.00 US per oz. I even have all the ingredients. I just never thought to combine them in that particular way. 

 

Bookmarked!

 

I did not care for the anise either, so that is good news to me, and brown butter is appealing too. I like the fact too that I might be able to make small amounts to be used at once in my mortar and pestle.

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> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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A friend gave me a carton of eggs from her backyard chickens.  Look at that bright tall yolk.  Served with left over small pork chop but the egg was definitely a star!

 

image.jpg

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6 hours ago, liuzhou said:

Some idiot opened a 小笼包 xiǎo lóng bāo shop right next to my home! I have no chance! If only she did a good black coffee (or chilled champagne instead) I'd marry her! THe only drink she has is warm soya milk. Yuck!

 

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I would marry her too!  

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Headed out today to 208 on Hollywood road, an osteria with a nice brunch buffet (and a kid's playroom for a relaxed morning*). Buffet was good, a lot of seafood (crabs, octopus salad, home-cured salmon, ...) and salads. Extensive antipasti section as well. The offer comes with a main as well and I opted for Eggs Benedict. It was just ok. Bit then again, even a mediocre Eggs Benedict is still very satisfying ...

 

* all the guys attending made fun that it would be an even more relaxed morning if we would take the free flow of wine & beer offer as well. Strangely, none of the ladies attending made any attempt to agree ...

WP_20161023_11_58_00_Rich.jpg

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A split and toasted TJ's Parmesan & rosemary roll smeared with a mix of jalapeño-peach glaze (from Deep Run Roots Jalapeño-Peach Chicken recipe) and Dijon mustard, chicken and a slice of prosciutto.

I wasn't going to post this as it was quite similar to something I posted not long ago but it was really good, it's half-eaten here:

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It's now all gone!

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I am always impressed by the variety in the breakfast thread. Ninety nine mornings out of one hundred I eat toast with butter and marmalade. I do enjoy several types of bread, as long as it gets toasted. Once in a while we make popovers, but only if we have forgotten to buy bread.

 

I could imagine pho or some kind of Asian soup for breakfast, not that I ever have leftover pho around. What I would really love is someone who plies the streets with a pho cart every morning. You hear them calling or ringing a bell and you run outside with your big bowl in hand. Then half an hour later the Vietnamese Coffee Cart comes by....

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12 minutes ago, Katie Meadow said:

I am always impressed by the variety in the breakfast thread. Ninety nine mornings out of one hundred I eat toast with butter and marmalade. I do enjoy several types of bread, as long as it gets toasted. Once in a while we make popovers, but only if we have forgotten to buy bread.

 

I could imagine pho or some kind of Asian soup for breakfast, not that I ever have leftover pho around. What I would really love is someone who plies the streets with a pho cart every morning. You hear them calling or ringing a bell and you run outside with your big bowl in hand. Then half an hour later the Vietnamese Coffee Cart comes by....

 I second your motion.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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1 hour ago, Katie Meadow said:

I am always impressed by the variety in the breakfast thread. Ninety nine mornings out of one hundred I eat toast with butter and marmalade.

 

In my case, it's almost invariably steel-cut oats. The odd time I'm not hungry, or don't have oats ready to go, I'll just have tea and toast.


“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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"Chocolate persimmon", @FrogPrincesse?  Please tell more.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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5 minutes ago, Smithy said:

"Chocolate persimmon", @FrogPrincesse?  Please tell more.

It's a variety of persimmon. They are on the smaller side, a bit elongated, and have seeds. They get very soft as they ripen and are quite delicious!

 

http://www.specialtyproduce.com/produce/Tsuru_Noko_Chocolate_Persimmons_5497.php

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Oh how I love persimmons.  As a little girl, I would have them when I visited my "nice" Nana.  I never saw them anywhere else. For a long time, I thought she arranged for them just for me and no one else ever got to even taste one.  Yes, she was that special to me. I still associate the taste with being a loved grandchild.  Perfect breakfast!

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2 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

Pilot project.  Sunchokes, given to me by a friend, sliced and roasted.  Tomato chutney alongside.

IMG_3946.jpg

So how were they?

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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50 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

They tasted really good.  The pilot is also to test The *ahem* aftereffects of Jerusalem Artichokes so I started with just a small quantity.  So far, so good :D!

 I did not quite know how to ask the question.xD

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Like beans, they incline one to flatulate. :P


“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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image.jpeg

 

A few days ago I realized my clamshell of cherry tomatoes was rapidly going south. I cut the tomatoes in half, added some crushed garlic, some thyme sprigs, some salt and some olive oil and blistered them in a hot oven. I put them in a clean jar and have been enjoying them since. Breakfast was homemade toasted bread with homemade "chevre" and some of these tomatoes which I piled onto the cheese to make a very messy tartine.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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42 minutes ago, Anna N said:

image.jpeg

 

A few days ago I realized my clamshell of cherry tomatoes was rapidly going south. I cut the tomatoes in half, added some crushed garlic, some thyme sprigs, some salt and some olive oil and blistered them in a hot oven. I put them in a clean jar and have been enjoying them since. Breakfast was homemade toasted bread with homemade "chevre" and some of these tomatoes which I piled onto the cheese to make a very messy tartine.

Homemade "chevre" - care to share how you do that ?

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