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rotuts

Deep Run Roots by Vivian Howard

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17 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

Looks intriguing and is a unique idea to incorporate more dried peas, beans and lentils in ones diet seeing this is forefront in Canadian news these days.

 

 

Yeah. 

 

And you know...I read articles today from three major news outlets about the proposed changes to Canada's Food Guide. All three mentioned that public input was solicited, and none of the three provided a link to the "consultation" page on Health Canada's website. 

 

Hmmmm...perhaps I need to post that link somewhere here on the forum, for Canadian eGers. 

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31 minutes ago, Shelby said:

Damn, that looks good!

 I'm guessing you mean the gumbo sauce and not Canada's food guide.xDxD

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Shelby, it is really good!  I used my frozen Cherokee Purples!  Homemade Andouille Sausage.  The shrimp stock was actually shrimp and some juice from an octopus I had cooked in wine.  Homemade Pinto Gris from our vineyard. Homegrown garlic.  So a lot of local ingredients.  I have four portions in the freezer for a nice lunch for me and my DH this winter.

 

Chromedome, Here is a good place to start:  http://www.healthycanadians.gc.ca/health-system-systeme-sante/consultations/foodguide-guidealimentaire/index-eng.php?_ga=1.76770709.1001559474.1477330481

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image.jpeg

Howard's "Everyday Cucumber"  served with some sous vide pork tenderloin.  Her dish seems to me to be on the cusp between a salad and a pickle.  It's a little too aggressive to meet my own internal idea of a salad. The lack of any oil to take the edge off the vinegar is the culprit I think. I liked it because I did find it refreshing and I'm curious as to what it will be like tomorrow.   My heart was set on making the charred onion and cucumber relish but sometimes my body does not quite keep up with my heart and I had to settle for this. :):)

 

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Smoked Mayo Prep. I went all in with 12 ear's  of fall corn smoked with river birch.  

 

rP1050320.jpg            

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11 hours ago, Steve Irby said:

Smoked Mayo Prep. I went all in with 12 ear's  of fall corn smoked with river birch

 

I really liked the flavor of that smoked corn mayo.  Since half of the corn was puréed right into the mayo, the texture was lighter and less silky smooth than my usual homemade mayo but the flavor was great.  I hope you like it, too.

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I was looking at the recipes on PBS website today and Citrus Sweet Potato Purée with Pork Crackings caught my eye.  The recipe did not look right (juice and zest of lyme, lemon, orange seemed to be too much for four sweet potatoes).  I clicked on video and it is very different from the recipe and much more complex, it includes maple syrup and apple cider vinegar reduction that is poured on top of sweet potato purée prior to topping it with the cracklings.  Video also includes instructions on making the cracklings.  And she uses only a little bit of orange zest and juice in the video.  Video is chefy and I like it.  Does she have this recipe in the book? Is it like PBS written version or more like the video?  

http://www.pbs.org/food/recipes/citrus-sweet-potato-puree-with-pork-cracklins/

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38 minutes ago, chefmd said:

Does she have this recipe in the book?

No, the book does not have a recipe for Citrus Sweet Potato Purée with Pork Cracklins.  I don't recall seeing a recipe for cracklins in the cookbook, although it's possible I've missed it.

There is a recipe for Citrus Sweet Potato Butter that is very similar to the PBS website recipe you linked to for the purée although it uses the zest of half a lemon, lime and orange and 1/2 cup of orange juice, omitting the lemon and lime juice. It also calls for less butter and brown sugar and adds 2 dashes of hot sauce.

The book serves that Citrus Sweet Potato Butter with a couple of other dishes, one of them is turkey with Pecan Cranberry Relish and Warm Sorghum Vinaigrette.  The sorghum viniagrette has a number of similarities with the maple/cider vinegar reduction from the video, subbing sorghum for the maple syrup and red onion for the shallots.  

 

Hope that helps!

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10 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

I really liked the flavor of that smoked corn mayo.  Since half of the corn was puréed right into the mayo, the texture was lighter and less silky smooth than my usual homemade mayo but the flavor was great.  I hope you like it, too.

We really enjoyed the first batch.  I was worried that I was a little to aggressive with the smoke but it turned out great.  We're still getting good tomatoes so lunch was elbow lick sandwiches on an italian/semolina/sesame bread from the farmers market.  I vacuum bagged three additional portions of fresh smoked corn and may prep some more if the corn holds till next week.    

 

I haven't read the full thread but it's quite interesting to observe that my local fare is somewhat  alien to many of the Egullet family.  I've seen many post extolling the virtues of Rancho Gordo beans when we have access to many varieties (that are superior IMHO) of fresh beans/peas that are routinely blanched, frozen, and are a daily staple.  To add to Vivian's comment peas (pink eyed purple hulls were my mom's favorite) were served during the week and butterbeans (baby lima) were reserved for Sunday dinner (served at noon).  If you had dinner of creamed corn and butterbeans  you were having formal meal.  A lima bean was a mealy, dried bean cooked up with a ham hock that was served at meat and 3 lunch spots.

 

Here's a couple of photo's of fresh beans from the  markets this weekend. The first is speckled butterbeans (Rattlesnake Beans!) from a Mennonite farm stand.

rP1050323.jpg

 

And butterbeans and peas from the local produce market.

 

rP1050328.jpg

 

Dinner tonight (it was the big meal, lunch was the sandwiches) was fried green tomatoes, oysters and softshell crabs.  Served with remoulade, roasted corn mayo and salad greens mix.

rP1050331.jpg

 

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Just picked up my copy from the library and I've been glued to it all afternoon. I've already marked enough recipes for it to qualify as a definite wish list item. So fun!  Love her!

 

How can I smoke corn without a smoker or a grill? How many of you can actually get your mouth to your elbow?

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18 minutes ago, Katie Meadow said:

How many of you can actually get your mouth to your elbow?

 

I can.  Just checked.  It tickles.

 

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37 minutes ago, Katie Meadow said:

How can I smoke corn without a smoker or a grill?

 

I smoked the corn for the smoked corn mayo on my stove top, following the method in this Saveur article.

I used my stovetop pressure cooker as I figured it would give a good seal without having to wrap everything in foil as done in that article.

I was impressed at how much smoky flavor was imparted to the corn in that way.  
 

 

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6 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

I smoked the corn for the smoked corn mayo on my stove top, following the method in this Saveur article.

I used my stovetop pressure cooker as I figured it would give a good seal without having to wrap everything in foil as done in that article.

I was impressed at how much smoky flavor was imparted to the corn in that way.  
 

 

Thanks for sharing this!  Looks like an excellent solution when an outdoor smoker is not viable.  

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7 hours ago, Katie Meadow said:

How can I smoke corn without a smoker or a grill?

 

Here is Steven Raichlen's solution for doing just that. He wants you to buy this stovetop smoker, though, and it costs almost $50. My local PBS station out of UNC recently aired an episode of his that was all about smoking without a traditional outdoor smoker. Unfortunately, it's not one of those that is offered free on the PBS site.

 

@blue_dolphin's solution would work better for me.

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11 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

I smoked the corn for the smoked corn mayo on my stove top, following the method in this Saveur article.

I used my stovetop pressure cooker as I figured it would give a good seal without having to wrap everything in foil as done in that article.

I was impressed at how much smoky flavor was imparted to the corn in that way.  
 

 

 

Thanks for the Saveur link.  I'd seen this technique (and done something similar in a wok, for tea-smoked duck) but forgotten about it.  It'll be the ticket for me for the next few months. 

 

What kind of wood did you use, and how long did you smoke the corn?

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1 hour ago, Smithy said:

 I'd seen this technique (and done something similar in a wok, for tea-smoked duck) but forgotten about it

Yes, there's a wok smoking tutorial over on Serious Eats - Wok Skills 101: Indoor Smoking that may be helpful if someone wants to use a wok.

 

1 hour ago, Smithy said:

What kind of wood did you use, and how long did you smoke the corn?

The recipe calls for blanching the corn first, then smoking 15 minutes over apple, cherry or peach wood. 

I ordered Cameron brand apple wood smoker chips from Amazon. I did my usual microwave in the husk method, peeled off the husks and followed the 15 min smoking time.  You can see from the picture I posted upthread that the corn I smoked this way is much lighter than the photo in @Steve Irby's post just above but I thought the amount of smoky flavor it imparted was good. 
 

 

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I don't know what wood chips cost  ' for indoors smokers '

 

but Home Depo has them for the BBQ  and they are the same and probably near you and much cheaper ;

 

http://www.homedepot.com/s/bbq%20wood%20chips?NCNI-5

 

all you have to do is not to use too many , and then seal the ' pot ' tightly and when the remaining wood chips go out and cool , store in a zip lock , perhaps in you

 

garage or similar if they then are very aromatic after some time in the HD zip lock bag

 

Ive done a lot of woodworking and used my own chips on grills etc 

 

just use fruit wood and you will be find.    the smoke does smell different   i.e. cherry , apple   but your smelling smoke  and in the smoked item the wood

 

difference is less pronounced.    Hickory is fairly strong smoke.  Mesquite perhaps the strongest.


Edited by rotuts (log)
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BTW   if you use a pot for smoking  make sure it has a tight fitting metal lid

 

if dry chips catch fire , you will need that lid to put the fire out by depriving the wood of oxygen.

 

or have a spry bottle of water available etc

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@gfweb  

 

nice pick up.   very interesting article.

 

the whole aura of ' A Chef's Life ' ( the TV show ) struck me as different after seeing the first show.

 

Im pleased there has been success so far for not only VH and her family , but the community she lives in and the people who work with her.

 

love the idea of a Bakery / Breakfast place.  I just wish it were closer to me.  A good breakfast place, making much of what they serve is

 

a Gift on the plate.   hope they know someone who knows Coffee.   Just saying.

 

I have a fairly good idea who the person is she talked about at the end of the article, having seen all the shows.

 

Kudos to all of them.


Edited by rotuts (log)
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Also noted from the article that they are filming the fifth season. Good news indeed.

 

 

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Here's a review of Deep Run Roots from the Washington Post.  

The reviewer discusses and includes recipes for Apple, Scallion and Oyster Ceviche, Blueberry-Rosemary Breakfast Pudding, Marinated Turnips With Orange and Pumpkin Seeds and Scarlett’s Chicken and Rice.

 

 

 

 

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