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DianaM

The Bread Topic (2016-)

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12 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Bread11262019.png

 

 

If this looks a little different, it is my first attempt at 100% rye, 85% hydration.  Unfortunately the flour is not the finely milled European style rye that I would like.

 

 

 

 

It is possible to get a finer flour using a blender - with caution.  I have done it with coarse "wholemeal" wheat flour from England.

you have to have the empty blender running and pour a stream of the flour, no more than a cup at a time into the jar and stop immediately.

Pour out the flour and check it, it should be almost all very fine. Repeat until you have processed all the flour you need.

Sift the result and if there is still a significant amount of coarse meal,  put that through the blender routine.  Just one repeat, otherwise it can get a burnt flavor.  

Ive also done this with barley meal and with a couple of the "ancient grains"  flours that in the early days tended to be a bit coarser than I liked.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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20 minutes ago, andiesenji said:

 

It is possible to get a finer flour using a blender - with caution.  I have done it with coarse "wholemeal" wheat flour from England.

you have to have the empty blender running and pour a stream of the flour, no more than a cup at a time into the jar and stop immediately.

Pour out the flour and check it, it should be almost all very fine. Repeat until you have processed all the flour you need.

Sift the result and if there is still a significant amount of coarse meal,  put that through the blender routine.  Just one repeat, otherwise it can get a burnt flavor.  

Ive also done this with barley meal and with a couple of the "ancient grains"  flours that in the early days tended to be a bit coarser than I liked.

Thank you @andiesenji for this information...

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A boule for my wife and I to eat, with the winter veg soup I made last Sunday morning...

 

 

Boule 24-11-19....jpg

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These are two of the Ryes I got from New York Bakers.  I think you can see the texture in these photos.

HPIM4205.thumb.jpg.2ced741b147d996e03b39a8ebc85b405.jpg

HPIM4206.thumb.jpg.11c92218fb48980e1c863175576ef23f.jpg

 

 

The fine "meal"  behaves like coarse whole wheat in combination with regular wheat bread flour for a similar texture.  I use 1/3 of it to 2/3 wheat in the sandwich bread I like.  

 

The Bay State Wingold Dark Rye is very fine and I haven't used it 100%. I use is half and half with bread flour in a recipe for German Onion Rye.

I also used it in Swedish Limpa bread. I think it was 1 cup rye to 2 cups AP. 

I used this with pumpernickel and whole wheat, 1/3 each to make a dark "cocktail rye"  baked in a cylinder mold. 

 

Anyway, I mentioned this vendor in another post.  I recommend their products!

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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7 hours ago, andiesenji said:

These are two of the Ryes I got from New York Bakers.  I think you can see the texture in these photos.

HPIM4205.thumb.jpg.2ced741b147d996e03b39a8ebc85b405.jpg

HPIM4206.thumb.jpg.11c92218fb48980e1c863175576ef23f.jpg

 

 

The fine "meal"  behaves like coarse whole wheat in combination with regular wheat bread flour for a similar texture.  I use 1/3 of it to 2/3 wheat in the sandwich bread I like.  

 

The Bay State Wingold Dark Rye is very fine and I haven't used it 100%. I use is half and half with bread flour in a recipe for German Onion Rye.

I also used it in Swedish Limpa bread. I think it was 1 cup rye to 2 cups AP. 

I used this with pumpernickel and whole wheat, 1/3 each to make a dark "cocktail rye"  baked in a cylinder mold. 

 

Anyway, I mentioned this vendor in another post.  I recommend their products!

 

My order of Bay State from New York Bakers arrived this evening.  Thanks.

 

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On 11/26/2019 at 12:36 PM, ptw1953 said:

A boule for my wife and I to eat, with the winter veg soup I made last Sunday morning...

 

 

Boule 24-11-19....jpg

That boule is so pretty. Love your scoring and the beautiful golden colour.

@JoNorvelleWalker, the coarser rye is closer to the stone ground rye that I get from a local source and it is the rye I use to feed my sourdough starter.   


Edited by Ann_T (log)
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Today's loaf from the 3-pound bread machine.  3 1/2 cups bread flour, 2 cups KA White Whole Wheat flour, 5 tablespoons dry whole milk powder, 5 tablespoons sugar, 3 teaspoons salt, 1 3/4 teaspoons SAF instant yeast. 1/3 cup vegetable oil, 1 2/3 cup warm water.

 

I won't cut it until tomorrow.  Will add a photo of the crumb then.

HPIM4207.jpg

HPIM4208.jpg

HPIM4209.jpg

HPIM4211.jpg

HPIM4212.jpg

 

 

I had to cut the top off so it would fit into my slicing guide.  Beautiful crumb, can be sliced thin.  Toasts nicely, great flavor.  Only faintly sweet.

HPIM4213.thumb.jpg.1e10ba2aa5f1a986fbdf1fbaad4b7838.jpg


Edited by andiesenji (log)
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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Here's an interesting story. I don't think it's behind a paywall (or at least, there are a certain number of stories free.)

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Cacio e pepe al taglio from Mastering Pizza

IMG_1660.thumb.jpeg.ed18bc1312879456dad722dfe456a77f.jpeg

 

IMG_1662.thumb.jpeg.aa416b87e32a1ac57d326f4cff47d860.jpeg

The dough was the al taglio dough at 80% hydration made with 50% bread flour and 50% stone ground, whole grain Glenn wheat flour.

Basically, cheesy bread with pepper!

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37 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Tonight's rye for tomorrow's staff party at the library didn't rise.  Not even a little.

 

i

it will work. Bake,  slice thinly, maybe toast and have a nice spread - sweet or savory. That is what we do - adapt.  Bread is a living creature.

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4 minutes ago, heidih said:

i

it will work. Bake,  slice thinly, maybe toast and have a nice spread - sweet or savory. That is what we do - adapt.  Bread is a living creature.

 

Yes, the last rye loaf I made didn't rise much* but was improved by toasting.  This, I am not so sure.  Weather permitting I shall bring it in the morning and see how many people die.  (I'm not worried about my reputation because for last year's party I made chocolate.)

 

 

*however it did rise.

 

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12 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Yes, the last rye loaf I made didn't rise much* but was improved by toasting.  This, I am not so sure.  Weather permitting I shall bring it in the morning and see how many people die.  (I'm not worried about my reputation because for last year's party I made chocolate.)

 

 

*however it did rise.

 

 

Don;' think you are in Salem witches territory   https://www.britannica.com/story/how-rye-bread-may-have-caused-the-salem-witch-trials

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3 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Tonight's rye for tomorrow's staff party at the library didn't rise.  Not even a little.

 

Did the dough rise once  and then it didn't  rise in the oven?  

 


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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23 minutes ago, andiesenji said:

Did the dough rise once  and then it didn't  rise in the oven?  

 

 

Didn't seem to rise at all.

 

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2 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Didn't seem to rise at all.

 

 

It’s for your libraries staff meeting, right ? Just call it “Frodo’s Lembas bread” and offer mulled wine for dipping. I guarantee there will be no complaints ...

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On 12/2/2019 at 3:56 PM, blue_dolphin said:

Cacio e pepe al taglio from Mastering Pizza

IMG_1660.thumb.jpeg.ed18bc1312879456dad722dfe456a77f.jpeg

 

IMG_1662.thumb.jpeg.aa416b87e32a1ac57d326f4cff47d860.jpeg

The dough was the al taglio dough at 80% hydration made with 50% bread flour and 50% stone ground, whole grain Glenn wheat flour.

Basically, cheesy bread with pepper!

WOW!! look at that crumb.     Love the idea of just cheese and pepper.  

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I made a half-batch of the Sweet Potato Onion Bread from Deep Run Roots.  

IMG_1674.thumb.jpeg.9d0fe84e95689fd43e5441104af89594.jpeg

This was not without its challenges as I described over here in the Deep Run Roots thread. 

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Bread12062019.png

 

For the first time in, I believe, forever -- I neglected to score my boule.  Comes from two weeks of attempting to bake rye.  I am so ashamed.

 

 

Crumb12062019.png

 

 

I desperately need a more capacious steam oven.

 

 

 

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A bit of a mash up where I used the toppings from this Broccolini and Charred Lemon Flatbread on the Al Taglio Dough (50% bread flour + 50% stone ground, whole grain Glenn wheat flour) from Mastering Pizza.  

IMG_1699.thumb.jpeg.870d1ce8ebfd14bcf3082b67fd9e57de.jpeg

 

IMG_1702.thumb.jpeg.a4b0b2d423dc634733a16354d76a0004.jpeg

 

IMG_1705.thumb.jpeg.a7b34a7e31adfacdf12c6ec2e701b87c.jpeg

I had a lot less goat cheese than the recipe called for so I added some mozzarella midway when I turned the pan. I also blanched the lemon slices because of a previous and very bitter experience with lemon slices on a flat bread. 

Excellent flavor combo with roasted garlic purée, broccolini, sliced shallot and lemon, goat cheese and a bit of Parmesan. 

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