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DianaM

The Bread Topic (2016-)

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26 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

Wow, that bread looks to be very ‘tasty’.  Lots of nice airy pockets.

Thanks! I paid for it with blisters, haha (banged my elbow in two spots on the oven door pulling the lid off the dutch oven):

 

 

739D5135-0D21-4334-B85A-CA6D234A795D.jpeg

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Posted (edited)

The photo is great.

i can almost smell how good it is

 

Battle scars....🤕

worth it

and see how much you learned 😁


Edited by Okanagancook (log)

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Question

do you Eat is as is.

how about toasting it?  Probably lightly toasted.

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1 hour ago, Okanagancook said:

Question

do you Eat is as is.

how about toasting it?  Probably lightly toasted.

 

If I were carbing at the moment, I’d get a good and crunchy toast on it (whole wheat absorbs and holds onto a lot of moisture ime), slather it with butter and some cactus pear jelly, or maybe some pecan butter. Buttered toast is probably my favourite food, hehe. 

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Yikes, that is a bad place for a burn.

 

I need help.

 

I bought a pullman loaf pan today.   

The size will make what I assume is more like a cocktail size loaf.

http://www.gobel.fr/en/catalogue/non-stick/?f=BREAD+%26+PULLMAN+LOAF#ref-219310

 

Brand is Gobel and pan measures inside, 10" X 3 3/4" X 3 1/8"

It is the Toastbrot with lid Ref: 219310

 

Not sure how much dough this pan will hold.

There is a recipe but it calls for 500g of flour and that seems like a lot of dough for 

a pan this size.

 

Any advice would be greatly appreciated. 

 

 

 

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11 minutes ago, Ann_T said:

Yikes, that is a bad place for a burn.

 

I need help.

 

I bought a pullman loaf pan today.   

The size will make what I assume is more like a cocktail size loaf.

http://www.gobel.fr/en/catalogue/non-stick/?f=BREAD+%26+PULLMAN+LOAF#ref-219310

 

Brand is Gobel and pan measures inside, 10" X 3 3/4" X 3 1/8"

It is the Toastbrot with lid Ref: 219310

 

Not sure how much dough this pan will hold.

There is a recipe but it calls for 500g of flour and that seems like a lot of dough for 

a pan this size.

 

Any advice would be greatly appreciated. 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/a-smaller-pain-de-mie-recipe

 

Does this help?

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14 hours ago, Ann_T said:

Thanks @ElsieD

 

I also found this link with slightly different measurements.

 

  https://www.cooksinfo.com/pullman-loaf-pans

 

 

 

 

I made a 13" one the other day and the lid popped off after about 6 minutes in the oven.  Makes quite a noise.  That happened once before, when I first started making pullman loaves.  

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11 hours ago, ElsieD said:

I made a 13" one the other day and the lid popped off after about 6 minutes in the oven.  Makes quite a noise.  That happened once before, when I first started making pullman loaves.  

 

@ElsieD, Thanks for the heads up.    I saw this comment while the dough was rising.    So I was very cautious, when I put the dough in the pan.  I erred on the side of slightly less.  Next time I will increase it slightly.  But I didn't know what to expect and was afraid of the lid popping off.  

 

 

 

1865276505_PaindeMieApril30th2019.thumb.jpg.1ad6c923eb947d252e27cead99cc62ba.jpg

This is the pan.  A small Pullman by Gobel.  

 

1690470803_HomeStyleBreadApril30th2019.thumb.jpg.c052ab3b6d47cb6344b507bae3fe2663.jpg

Proofing.

 

1120441816_HomeStyleBreadApril30th20191.thumb.jpg.85d39f0508d5ed2965c0058260b18ae3.jpg

It just came out of the oven so I won't slice it until tomorrow morning. 

 

Not quite as squared as I think it would have been if I had added a little more dough. 

 

814100952_HomeStyleBreadApril30th20192.thumb.jpg.aaed4a0b2976225d52276cced84654e1.jpg

 

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I fed my starter last night and with the discard made a biga.  Today, just before I went out around 1:00pm I mixed up the dough using the dough hook on the Kitchenaide.  Out I went, figuring it would take a long time to double.  When i got home, about 2 1/2 hours later, the dough had more than doubled.  I was expecting it to take a lot longer.  I punched the dough down, gave it a few folds and stuck it in the fridge.  I'm going to keep an eye on it until it cools completely in case it decided to double up or more again.  I also plan to give it a few more folds.  Tomorrow I will bake some bread with some of it.  Does anyone see anything wrong with this plan?

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@Elsie,  If I don't intend to bake the same day, I don't let the dough rise.   

 

After the last stretch and fold it goes into the fridge and I leave it until the day I want to bake and then take it out and give it a few hours to warm up and rise.   

 

Then I shape, proof and bake. 

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1 hour ago, Ann_T said:

@Elsie,  If I don't intend to bake the same day, I don't let the dough rise.   

 

After the last stretch and fold it goes into the fridge and I leave it until the day I want to bake and then take it out and give it a few hours to warm up and rise.   

 

Then I shape, proof and bake. 

 

Oops.  I have made a note to not let the dough rise before putting it in the fridge.  I just checked the refrigerated dough and it had almost doubled.  I knocked it back down.   Tomorrow I plan on splitting the dough in three and baking baguettes in this.  I hope I end up with something edible.

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I tried to shape my sourdough but it is so slack it is impossible to shape.  Any suggestions?  Pour it into a baking pan?  Add more flour?

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On 5/2/2019 at 1:28 PM, ElsieD said:

I tried to shape my sourdough but it is so slack it is impossible to shape.  Any suggestions?  Pour it into a baking pan?  Add more flour?

 

I'm just now seeing this, but wouldn't have had confidence to make suggestions. When my dough has been too slack I've put it in a pan. It's been edible, but hardly the lovely texture that we see in these pages.

 

What did you end up trying, and how did it come out? 

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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1 hour ago, Smithy said:

 

When my dough has been too slack I've put it in a pan. It's been edible, but hardly the lovely texture that we see in these pages.

 

One of the things I have trouble with sometimes is figuring out if my dough is slack because it's too wet, or if it's slack because I've not built up enough structure. The former kind of dough can get great results poured into a preheated Dutch oven, whereas the latter kind isn't going to get an open crumb no matter what. But the difference isn't always obvious to me, particularly as the whole grain percentage goes up.

 

That said, almost any slack dough will make a good cast iron skillet pizza. (Probably a decent focaccia, too, now that I think about it.)

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On ‎5‎/‎2‎/‎2019 at 12:28 PM, ElsieD said:

I tried to shape my sourdough but it is so slack it is impossible to shape.  Any suggestions?  Pour it into a baking pan?  Add more flour?

I ran into the same problem a few days ago when I was making a (CI) recipe for Almost No Knead Bread.

I was doubling the recipe and ended up with a too-wet dough.  After resting it overnight it was way too slack.

I added about an additional cup of flour but it was still overly soft even after an additional three hours rise.

I put it into my Breadpot and into to a cold oven,. then set it for 450ºF.  Baked for 50 minutes, removed the lid and baked for another 10 minutes.  Miraculously, it turned out fine.  

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I added some handfuls of craisins and raisins to the dough and  literally poured the batter into my hamburger bun pans.  It made 12 buns.  I had some dough left over which I baked in small springform pan.  It was all baked at 450F for 45 minutes.  We ate the small one and found it to be much like the buns I make using a focaccia recipe, except that we prefer the focaccia ones.    The focaccia recipe is quicker, easier, and not nearly as much of a PITA.  Also, I found the bread had a "wet" texture to it that was rectified when I toasted it.  I expect that the buns, since we eat them toasted, will be fine.  One of these days I 'll try again as my starter is strong.  If that doesn't work out, I'll be saying goodbye to sourdough.

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Posted (edited)

@Elsie, what hydration are you using?

Don't say goodbye to your sourdough.   

That wouldn't be the problem.   

Try reducing the water next time to around 65%.  See if that makes a difference.

 

And next time you have a dough that you are having problems shaping,  I would suggest just pulling it  into a shape like foccaccia or a ciabatta.   


Edited by Ann_T (log)
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Thank you @Ann_T.  I'll try a lower hydration next time.  This dough, I could not have shaped into anything.  The only reason it worked for the buns was because the pan held the dough together.

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Today's bake.

I'm always being asked on some of the face book groups I'm on what flour I use and whether it has to be bread flour.

My usual flour is Roger's Silver Star Commercial Bread Flour. The only place I can purchase the Silver Star is at Costco. But in the past I used just Roger's unbleached All purpose flour or their regular Bread Flour, that I can buy in any grocery store.

I was almost out of the Silver Star so I picked up a 10K bag of Rogers unbleached All Purpose flour.

Hand mixed a 1000g batch of dough yesterday at 72% hydration. After the last stretch and fold, I divided it into two containers and both went into the fridge.

2024932250_BatardMay7th2019.thumb.jpg.0471e29269b8052cd3ffd937813afd6f.jpg

Took one out early this morning and baked two Batards.

 

1239658789_BatardslicedMay7th2019.thumb.jpg.bde3aa9a1b9450537b15a410d58fa169.jpg

I don't see any difference in the crust or the crumb between the flours. I still get the same shine.

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Posted (edited)
41 minutes ago, Ann_T said:

Today's bake.

I'm always being asked on some of the face book groups I'm on what flour I use and whether it has to be bread flour.

My usual flour is Roger's Silver Star Commercial Bread Flour. The only place I can purchase the Silver Star is at Costco. But in the past I used just Roger's unbleached All purpose flour or their regular Bread Flour, that I can buy in any grocery store.

I was almost out of the Silver Star so I picked up a 10K bag of Rogers unbleached All Purpose flour.

Hand mixed a 1000g batch of dough yesterday at 72% hydration. After the last stretch and fold, I divided it into two containers and both went into the fridge.

Took one out early this morning and baked two Batards.

I don't see any difference in the crust or the crumb between the flours. I still get the same shine.

 

First -- what beautiful loaves! 

 

I think being marked as "bread flour" is a lot less reliable an indicator of protein percentage than we'd like it to be. Really wish producers would just put the percentage on the bag.

 

I can't find the Silver Star specifically, and the 30g serving size makes it kind of imprecise, but the Rogers website claims both the AP and "bread flour" have 4g of protein per 30g serving.

I assume that means they both have a minimum of 3.5g/30g = 11.66%, as anything under 3.5g/30g would be rounded down.

 

King Arthur bread flour is 12.7%, with their AP notably high at 11.7%; plenty of KAF's bread recipes call for AP. Gold Medal AP is lower at 10.5%.

 

An old Chowhound thread here speculates that Canadian flour is higher protein across the board. 

 

All a long-winded way of saying that your AP flour may well be higher protein than the bread flour others can find. 

 

 

 


Edited by dtremit (log)

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4 minutes ago, Ann_T said:

@dtremit,    Both the Silver Star and the unbleached all purpose have 13.33%.  Not 11.7%. (4 grams of protein in 30g of flour) 

 

 


Sadly Nutrition Facts labels are rounded to the nearest gram (except for some values <1g). So "4g" could be anywhere from 3.5g (11.66%) to 4.49g (14.96%). There probably is some difference between those two flours, just not a big enough one to survive the rounding process.

 

Since no one eats flour by the tablespoon, I wish they'd just change the "serving size" to 100g and be done with it. That would reduce the margin of uncertainty a bit.

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