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DianaM

The Bread Topic (2016-)

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7 hours ago, ElsieD said:

I did not know that lids popped off pullman pans, but now I do.  

Interesting!   I have read about it somewhere but I’m very surprised that it actually happened.   The power of yeast always surprises me though.   Looking forward to your report when you finally cut into it.

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9 hours ago, Anna N said:

Interesting!   I have read about it somewhere but I’m very surprised that it actually happened.   The power of yeast always surprises me though.   Looking forward to your report when you finally cut into it.

 

Yes, after the 18 minute baking time, I opened the oven door to find the lid sitting on top of the bread, as though the lid had been removed and placed on top of the loaf.  I found it rather peculiar.

 

We ate a good chunk of the bread today for lunch.  Very happy with the crumb.

20180905_110806.jpg

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11 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

We ate a good chunk of the bread today for lunch.  Very happy with the crumb.

Looks great.  Thanks for sharing.  

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Batch of dough in the fridge since Sunday morning  -  1000g flour, 750g of water 4g of yeast and 30g of salt.

Baked yesterday.  Two baguettes, three small boules and one pizza. 

 

39987431_BaguetteandBoulesSeptember11th20181.thumb.jpg.e1da24239fba650f960015199125fe2e.jpg

 

Sliced a baguette this morning for breakfast.

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797455670_BaguettesNovember7th2018.thumb.jpg.bb8b8fd9796200080188c492b5f17551.jpg

 

Baked two baguettes land a pizza last night from a 750g batch at 75° hydration.

Baked on a stone in the Oster French Door oven. 

697347794_BaguettesNovember7th20181.thumb.jpg.471daf7937dc68c5ea860866bf81a73b.jpg

Baguettes sliced this morning. 

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Mixed two batches of dough early Monday morning. 

 

One 1000g batch at 75% hydration and one 750g at 68%.  The smaller batch was 80% Silver Star Flour and 20% Semolina. 

Both doughs went into the fridge and I took the 750g out mid afternoon for a same day bake.

 

391847087_November12th2018SameDayBakewithSemolina4.thumb.jpg.6c8e471756d140cae7e1509951fabd62.jpg

 

Six small loaves, four baked in the Oster FD Oven  and two in the CSO using the bread setting.  Came out of the oven just before bed.

 

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Sliced this morning to have with pasta. 

November 12th, 2018 Same Day Bake with Semolina 2.jpg

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3 hours ago, Ann_T said:

Mixed two batches of dough early Monday morning. 

 

One 1000g batch at 75% hydration and one 750g at 68%.  The smaller batch was 80% Silver Star Flour and 20% Semolina. 

Both doughs went into the fridge and I took the 750g out mid afternoon for a same day bake.

 

391847087_November12th2018SameDayBakewithSemolina4.thumb.jpg.6c8e471756d140cae7e1509951fabd62.jpg

 

Six small loaves, four baked in the Oster FD Oven  and two in the CSO using the bread setting.  Came out of the oven just before bed.

 

156616095_November12th2018SameDayBakewithSemolina3.thumb.jpg.52d7db96fbb872301edadddc58467469.jpg

Sliced this morning to have with pasta. 

November 12th, 2018 Same Day Bake with Semolina 2.jpg

 

Any thoughts for comparison?

 

Beautiful loaves as always!

 

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@JoNorvelleWalker Not really.  The crumb wasn't as "holey" as the 1000g batch will be when I get around to baking it.   But if I had left the 750 dough in the fridge for a longer fermentation, instead of baking same day it would have been holey too.   

I don't think I used enough of the Semolina flour to notice.    It didn't interfere with the shine though.

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Free form no=knead. Well developed flavor. 

no knead.JPG

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Sandwich bread with 30% whole wheat, minced leftover beans and their cooking water, sesame.

It was flavorful, earthy but not very beany, the bean starches made it very soft and tender.

 

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Jumping back into bread baking after a long break -- I lost two sourdough starters (one I'd made myself using pineapple juice, and another borrowed from a friend) to overzealous house cleaners and took it as a sign. We happened to be up in Vermont in October and stopped at the KAF store on the way back, and I picked up some of their starter. So far it has been working well for me. I have kept it at 50% per their recommendations.

 

I have made the KAF naturally leavened sourdough recipe twice now, with good results, baking on my Baking Steel griddle. I forgot to take pictures soon after baking; this is loaf #2 that's a few days old:

 

bread_loaf.jpg.cb8d1891c347ab0971fa71c9d027370f.jpgbread_crumb.jpg.a6b0499ed471049d8264f7f1bc061b94.jpg

 

I'm generally very happy with these, though I would love to get more height out of them. When I turn them out of the forms, they end up flattening out almost completely -- so even though they rise well in the oven, they're not very tall loaves. Thinking of reducing hydration a little and/or switching all the AP flour to bread flour, but not sure if these are really the correct responses.

 

Also curious -- what do others use sourdough discard for? So far I've had great luck with waffles and pizza dough, but middling success with dinner rolls.

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1 hour ago, dtremit said:

 

 

 

 

Also curious -- what do others use sourdough discard for? So far I've had great luck with waffles and pizza dough, but middling success with dinner rolls.

 

When my starter was still alive, I made pancakes a few times.

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I tried making pita breads for the first today.  The pita from Shaya uses the same dough for both pizza and pita.  I've already made a couple of pizzas so I figured I should give this a try, too.  

In the oven:

fullsizeoutput_3888.thumb.jpeg.13c1e4aac6086dc67f41a60f8d34c25f.jpeg

 

And out....nice chewy interior:

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I was kinda amazed that the pitas actually puffed up like they are supposed to and it's encouraged me to try these again and improve my dough handling.  I liked that he says to slap the dough down on the hot stone (or steel) like you're giving it a high five but I was a little afraid I might actually smack it and burn my hand to I was a bit too tentative.

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Nice puff on the pita.  Did you rest the formed pitas before cooking?  Some recipes I have used said that is the secret to getting them to puff.  I have made them both ways with virtually the same result...some don’t puff for some reason.


Edited by Okanagancook (log)

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4 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

Nice puff on the pita.  Did you rest the formed pitas before cooking?  Some recipes I have used said that is the secret to getting them to puff.  I have made them both ways with virtually the same result...some don’t puff for some reason.

Thanks!  I was so amazed that they puffed properly that I grabbed my camera to take a photo while they were still in the oven.

This dough gets several series of turns & folds with 1 hr rise periods in between before resting in the fridge overnight.  After portioning and shaping the dough into balls, they rise for 2-4 hrs but no additional rise or rest is specified after they are flattened out in the final shaping.

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Thanks.  Interesting.  My recipe is not as complicated.  One rise, punch down and form balls, let rise and then roll out. I am presuming all your pitas puffed.  

I have a video of some 54 seconds showing the pita puffing but I can’t seem to be able to upload the file type.


Edited by Okanagancook (log)
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39 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

was kinda amazed that the pitas actually puffed up like they are supposed to and it's encouraged me to try these again and improve my dough handling.

I was equally amazed when I followed our own @FoodMan‘s recipe.

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That recipe has you rest the formed breads 15-20 min before baking.  Also important to cover the breads after baking so they don’t dry out.

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Puffing occurs whenever a dough with sufficient air bubbles is heated rapidly. In this regard, a pita in not different than any other hearth bread baked at high temperatures. Letting the dough raise after rolling lets new air bubbles be created as an insurance against access degassing at the rolling stage. 

The thinner the pita is rolled, the more distinct the pocket will be. Roti is on the extreme of this spectrom - rolled very thin so that after puffing it collapses into two thin layers. A good pita (of the kind I associate with the word the most) should not be rolled too thin. This allowes the pita to have fluffy and bready "walls" rather than papery ones. Hand pressing it as thick as one whould shape a pizza crust is the way to go. 


Edited by shain That's what happens when you type on a phone :( (log)
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@blue_dolphin, beautiful pitas.   

391747822_December4th20182.thumb.jpg.cf5ec8cb5d7f8ec94264f6d30e098d69.jpg

 

Made baguette dough at 70% hydration on Sunday and baked last night.  Saved enough dough for Matt to have a pizza tonight.  

 

398121658_December4thslicedDecember5th2018.thumb.jpg.4e430fe184b1153720f901af1cea8eef.jpg

Sliced this morning for breakfast. 

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I've been testing a new, (at least for me), method of slow roasting beef.  As in 200-225 degrees for hours.  As part of my experimenting I made some soft pretzels rolls which turned out incredibly good for a novice bread baker.

 

IMG_0668.JPG

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On ‎12‎/‎9‎/‎2018 at 3:12 PM, David Ross said:

I've been testing a new, (at least for me), method of slow roasting beef.  As in 200-225 degrees for hours.  As part of my experimenting I made some soft pretzels rolls which turned out incredibly good for a novice bread baker.

 

IMG_0668.JPG

Thanks to all of you for teaching me about the intricacies of bread baking.  I used these rolls as the base for sandwiches with a slow-roasted beef roast I did last weekend.  I still have some work to do as the interior was a little soft for me and the next day the rolls pretty much crumbled when I cut into them but overall a good start for me.

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I was on hold for a long time and then on open line with a tech the other day. I asked her about getting ready for holidays and any baking. She stated "I can't cook". Figuratively took her hand and sent her to several no-knead bread sites. Sharing the love :) 

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