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DianaM

The Bread Topic (2016-)

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5 hours ago, blbst36 said:

I was wondering if I could get some help.  I want to make bread for thanksgiving, but I am not going to be in my apartment for most of the day (Attempting a big old hike that morning, so I am just assuming I won't have enough time to make the bread and turkey).  I wanted to make some challah bread.  If I made it the day before, how would I store it so that it wold still be good for dinner?

 

I was also thinking of making the dough all the way to the braid and putting it in the fridge.  Then, on Thursday, take it out when I get back to rise and bake.  Is this the type of dough I can do something like that with?  I am willing to cut my hike short for the sake of homemade bread xD

 

ETA - I will be using Peter Reinhart's recipe from Bread Baker's Apprentice

 

 

I have not tried it with challah, but I have had success making bread/rolls to the baking stage and then par-baking; baking it until it's formed, risen and crusted over a bit, but not fully done inside. Then you can finish it up with 10-15 minutes the next day right before dinner.

 

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Batch of bread dough, 1000g went into the fridge on Wednesday night.

Took enough out yesterday to make one loaf. Came of of the oven late last night.

 

5a198bcff2453_BreadNovember24th2017.thumb.jpg.9155f3e659f6b0660d95f436b152f914.jpg

 

Sliced this morning for breakfast toast.

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On 11/20/2017 at 3:06 PM, MelissaH said:

I'd make it the day before, through to completion. Once it's out of the oven and cooled, put it in a plastic bag. Then, while the turkey is resting, take it out of its bag and stick it in the oven for a few minutes to warm through.

Thanks!  I ended up baking it all the way, but didn't bother warming it.  I was afraid it would get too dark as it was already very dark.  I had some when it was fresh though.  I'm going to post it below

 

 

On 11/20/2017 at 6:56 PM, kayb said:

 

I have not tried it with challah, but I have had success making bread/rolls to the baking stage and then par-baking; baking it until it's formed, risen and crusted over a bit, but not fully done inside. Then you can finish it up with 10-15 minutes the next day right before dinner.

 

So, how do you know when to take it out?  Do you use the same temp as the original recipe?  Do you store it in the fridge over night?  Do you take it out for any amount of time before baking again?  Have you ever tried par-baking, then freezing?

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I made my first loaves of challah bread.  They came out a LOT better than I expected.  Why?  Because I saw "roll the dough out" and I thought rolling pin.  I had already flattened all the dough before I realized my mistake.  I also have no idea why they got so dark.  They only baked barely 30 minutes.  The temp was right in the oven - I have a thermometer for that.  The inner temp was good, so I took them out.  I covered them in everything bagel seasoning before I put them in.  It was a good idea, but some of the pieces got a little toasty.  It was still tasty.  I am going to give it another try.

 

All done.  Evil rolling pin in the background

20171122_205449.thumb.jpg.117cb81adca5d3cc723f3eb3852a9e15.jpg

 

Sliced (after letting cool completely)

20171122_215711.thumb.jpg.b9e492f7f9e75c4cbaf66c9b5b429b9e.jpg

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2 hours ago, blbst36 said:

Thanks!  I ended up baking it all the way, but didn't bother warming it.  I was afraid it would get too dark as it was already very dark.  I had some when it was fresh though.  I'm going to post it below

 

 

So, how do you know when to take it out?  Do you use the same temp as the original recipe?  Do you store it in the fridge over night?  Do you take it out for any amount of time before baking again?  Have you ever tried par-baking, then freezing?

 

My rolls, which are usually what I par-bake because of the time demands of Sunday or other family dinner, call for 20-25 minutes at 350. To par-bake, I go for about 10-12 minutes, at which point they're fully oven-sprung and have a dry crust and a little bit of browning starting, but are still doughy in the center, and I let them cool. Then I cover with foil and, as I'm usually doing them the night before, just leave them on the counter overnight. There's a local restaurant that does a similar thing with their rolls that sells the par-baked version out of their freezer case, so I'm guessing I could freeze after they were cooled and covered.

 

I bake the next day for about 15 minutes, again at 350.

 

Of course, since I've acquired the CSO, it's easier to just go ahead and bake them and then reheat for five minutes at 350. They taste just like fresh.

 

 

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5a1e33a73e0f3_November26th2017.thumb.jpg.9ad0f668f95b7425b77f59bac8cd8977.jpg

Baguette baked on Sunday night from the remaining dough from Wednesday.

5a1e33b36fa84_ToastNovember28th20171.thumb.jpg.e2bf8c4dcc0af6784e6538c6078997a1.jpg

 

Sliced tonight because Moe wanted some toast.

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11 hours ago, kayb said:

 

My rolls, which are usually what I par-bake because of the time demands of Sunday or other family dinner, call for 20-25 minutes at 350. To par-bake, I go for about 10-12 minutes, at which point they're fully oven-sprung and have a dry crust and a little bit of browning starting, but are still doughy in the center, and I let them cool. Then I cover with foil and, as I'm usually doing them the night before, just leave them on the counter overnight. There's a local restaurant that does a similar thing with their rolls that sells the par-baked version out of their freezer case, so I'm guessing I could freeze after they were cooled and covered.

 

I bake the next day for about 15 minutes, again at 350.

 

Of course, since I've acquired the CSO, it's easier to just go ahead and bake them and then reheat for five minutes at 350. They taste just like fresh.

 

 

 

Thanks!  NO clue what a CSO is, but I'm not going to be getting one.  I was thinking of trying to par-bake some challah bread.  I found out they are a friend's favorite bread, so I was thinking of making some and taking it when I got back home to visit.  Then, she can have some fresh baked bread.

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Sorry. Cuisinart Convection Steam Oven. It's a marvelous thing. You can somewhat mimic the action by putting ice cubes in a hot pan in a hot oven at the same time you put bread in, to create a blast of steam. Makes for a fresher-tasting toasted or reheated bread.

 

Must confess I have never made challah (though it makes the best French toast in the world). But I don't see why you couldn't par-bake it. Try half to 2/3 of your customary time, let cool COMPLETELY, and wrap. No need to refrigerate or freeze unless you're waiting a long time to finish the baking, I'd say.

 

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31 minutes ago, kayb said:

Sorry. Cuisinart Convection Steam Oven. It's a marvelous thing. You can somewhat mimic the action by putting ice cubes in a hot pan in a hot oven at the same time you put bread in, to create a blast of steam. Makes for a fresher-tasting toasted or reheated bread.

 

Must confess I have never made challah (though it makes the best French toast in the world). But I don't see why you couldn't par-bake it. Try half to 2/3 of your customary time, let cool COMPLETELY, and wrap. No need to refrigerate or freeze unless you're waiting a long time to finish the baking, I'd say.

 

 

Thanks!  I have a counter oven, but I am ok with using the big one since it's winter here :D 

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5a1f98a676481_SteamOvenNovember29th20171.thumb.jpg.ca087c5ada28e6b709926646fcabdeb0.jpg

 

Baked my first bread in the CSO tonight.  Started the dough after 2:30 this afternoon and the bread just came out of the oven at 9:00 PM.

 

Made a 500g batch at 72% hydration.  The loaf upfront is the one baked in the CSO.  The one in the background was baked in a Waring counter-top oven.  

 

Both baked on stones.   I have some 7" stones and one was perfect in the CSO for a round/boule.

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8 hours ago, Ann_T said:

 

 

Baked my first bread in the CSO tonight.  Started the dough after 2:30 this afternoon and the bread just came out of the oven at 9:00 PM.

 

 

And you are already an expert!!!  Wow, such beautiful breads.

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On 30/11/2017 at 6:06 AM, lindag said:

And you are already an expert!!!  Wow, such beautiful breads.

 

Thanks Linda.

 

Had enough dough leftover over from a batch that had been in the fridge since Friday to bake a small loaf last night. 

 

5a254c3c32d2f_December3rdbakeddoughfromDecember1st1.thumb.jpg.7e71e7e80cb0d9b06b1091470141ff39.jpg

Baked in the CSO at 450°.     

 

5a254c43cb4be_December3rdbakeddoughfromDecember1stslicedDecember4th20171.thumb.jpg.636596d0df636f45643e68ebb4a5dc11.jpg

Sliced this morning. 


Edited by Ann_T (log)
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CEB6F0E9-9991-4E54-BB2C-C8A7D221B82A.thumb.jpeg.0964574d5a0f52e57e3ae6014d573cd6.jpeg

 

Simple Crusty Bread ~ destined to be used for dunking in herb seasoned olive oil later today!

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Plain old boring bread, just like all the others. Levain, a bit of yeast, flour, water, salt. From Thomas Keller's Bouchon Bakery, mostly. I won't cut it open until tomorrow morning, it needs to cool and I need to sleep. 

Bread3.jpg

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I'm a liar. Sleep is for people who buy their bread. This is one good loaf. Flavorful, lovely texture. Sweet dreams.

Sliced.jpg

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On 11/8/2017 at 2:35 PM, Kerry Beal said:

It's the round loaves that I adored (as well as the pullman of course). I found ganged pan of 4 round loaves about 30 years ago and made my interpretation of the National Bakery's onion breads and cheese breads in them a number of times. First time I didn't know to weigh out the dough - took a bit of soaking to get those loaves out.

 

Like these.

I've had this pipe tin on ebay for awhile. Have received several inquires (some extremely odd) but only very low "offers" which I declined.  

I used it when I was catering for bread and cakes (sponge cake).  

 

I never had any trouble with loaves sticking - I used the Vegalene Food Release Spray or the Bak-klene - purchased at Smart & Final.  

I used to put on a mask to spray it but now Vegalene has an "Allergen-Free" release spray. 

Pipe tin pan 1.JPG

Pipe tin pan 2.JPG


Edited by andiesenji (log)
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14 hours ago, andiesenji said:

I've had this pipe tin on ebay for awhile. Have received several inquires (some extremely odd) but only very low "offers" which I declined.  

I used it when I was catering for bread and cakes (pound cake).  

 

I never had any trouble with loaves sticking - I used the Vegalene Food Release Spray or the Bak-klene - purchased at Smart & Final.  

I used to put on a mask to spray it but now Vegalene has an "Allergen-Free" release spray. 

Pipe tin pan 1.JPG

Pipe tin pan 2.JPG

Interesting - never would have thought of using it for pound cake. How much batter per round ? Shall have to dig mine out.

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13 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Interesting - never would have thought of using it for pound cake. How much batter per round ? Shall have to dig mine out.

That was an error.  I baked sponge cakes in it.  I don't know why I typed pound.

I filled them as full as I could, laying down extra batter down the middle, then closing it quickly and straight onto a hot sheet pan in a hot oven to "set" the batter in the bottom half quickly so it would the batter up into the top half.

I learned this trick from a baker friend who worked at the Huntington hotel.  

The temp preheat was 450 with the sheet pan in place.  The pipe tin was set on the sheet pan and the oven temp lowered to 325 and bake for 55 minutes.

There is room for a probe thermometer to be inserted into the center and I would do so at each end of the second loaf from the hinges.

 


Edited by andiesenji (log)
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