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DianaM

The Bread Topic (2016-)

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I made some rugbrød last week and had leftover rye starter and a bunch of soaked grains and seeds. I forgot about them and left them out and they all started sprouting and then fermented. I gave them a quick grind and threw them into my whole wheat formula using the rye starter and ended up with a really tasty, chewy loaf that I've been enjoying for my toast.

bread.thumb.jpg.aef00a2fc66f56cd06b9d7c9949c7352.jpg

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I'm considering doing some bread rolls next week, using my standard no knead dough. I do have a question, though.

 

When making a normal loaf, I bake it at 220ºC (428ºF) for 40-45 minutes until I get an internal temperature of 95ºC (about 200ºF). Clearly, the temperature, baking time or both will require adjustment for the rolls. Any suggestions gratefully received.

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15 hours ago, liuzhou said:

I'm considering doing some bread rolls next week, using my standard no knead dough. I do have a question, though.

 

When making a normal loaf, I bake it at 220ºC (428ºF) for 40-45 minutes until I get an internal temperature of 95ºC (about 200ºF). Clearly, the temperature, baking time or both will require adjustment for the rolls. Any suggestions gratefully received.

 

I usually bake rolls at a slightly higher temp, about 10-20ºC

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Last night a tragic baguette accident involving hydration.  So I baked ciabatta.  Used the CSO and followed Hamelman.

 

Ciabatta03142017.png

 

 

CiabattaSliced03142017.png

 

 

Excellent even with the slightly too brown top.  I suspect the 13 ounce loaf was slightly too large for the CSO.

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

I have been away for a while but today I made a few Irish Soda breads in memory of my mother who was Irish 100%!

 

These are traditional loaves, one white and one brown. Just flour, salt, baking soda and buttermilk. The brown one is 75% whole wheat flour.

 

I also brined a large brisket for a week and cooked it sous vide for the last two days. We will be eating all of this is an hour!!

DSC05211-crop.thumb.jpg.3efd9eda01701f15f3d39d1aaa256138.jpg

 

DSC05215-crop.thumb.jpg.e705912305476ac6d4fc890c19901b3a.jpg


Edited by paulpegg (log)
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Posted (edited)

It was a great relief to find that even though our new oven cannot reach the 510 F like the old one could, but still turns out a great loaf of no knead bread.

HC

IMG_1518.thumb.JPG.222eccd73b254aa0cf4c89d1e0edf393.JPGIMG_1519.thumb.JPG.29df23c23dfecaf9a664d1b31fa3131f.JPG


Edited by HungryChris (log)
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I thought I would share the purchased bread I bought at Harris Teeter grocery store today. I was determined to walk up there since I noticed they had Pane di Casa artisan bread on sale for $2 off the regular price of $5.99. This is a huge loaf, and although they say it is only 24 oz., I measured my humongous rectangular free form loaf at 14-1/2" x 8" x 4" tall. It's a crusty, rustic bread sold in a paper and cellophane sleeve open at one end. When I get it home, I always put it in a big plastic bag and seal it up with a twist tie so it doesn't get even crustier. The flavor and texture is great, and while it may not be as wonderful as some of the homemade loaves we see on here, for the yeast bread challenged among us, it is a delightful option. I can't wait to have a sandwich with some of the pastrami and provolone I also picked up there today.

 

Has anyone ever heard of "Pane di Casa"? Is this a real style of bread or just marketing speak? Any idea how to pronounce the "Pane" part of the name? pane/pa-nay/pan?

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1 hour ago, Thanks for the Crepes said:

Has anyone ever heard of "Pane di Casa"? Is this a real style of bread or just marketing speak? Any idea how to pronounce the "Pane" part of the name? pane/pa-nay/pan?

I think "Pane di Casa" simply means  "House Bread" in Italian.

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12 minutes ago, JohnT said:

I think "Pane di Casa" simply means  "House Bread" in Italian.

 

I figured that since I know pan de casa in Spanish, but is this a legit style of bread, or a marketing name. I am thinking marketing name. Either way, it's delicious! :)

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I just tried to find it in Carol Field's The Italian Baker, and I don't see it. That's not definitive, of course, but I would have expected to find it there.

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Sorry, my 02:00 am brain should have been a bit more specific. Normally artisan bakers just give a fancy foreign name to something that is just a plain old loaf. This appears to be more an US "thing" than most other places in the world - they think it sounds better than just calling it "white bread", "brown bread" or "house loaf" etc. Here in South Africa they skip the BS and call it a "Farmhouse white loaf" - the term "Farmhouse" indicating it is large or just "Artisnal White loaf". So, what I am trying to say is that using the name "Pane di Casa" does not indicate anything other than a simple loaf of bread.

 

I must admit that the "normal" price you quoted is scary! This equates to R75.00 in our local currency - my, or any other artisnal bakers bread, would not sell at that price or even half that quoted price, irrelevant of how good it looked or tasted.

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Does this sourdough starter still look alive?  It was started last Thursday.  

image.jpeg

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18 hours ago, JohnT said:

I must admit that the "normal" price you quoted is scary! This equates to R75.00 in our local currency - my, or any other artisnal bakers bread, would not sell at that price or even half that quoted price, irrelevant of how good it looked or tasted.

 

I too am shocked as some of the food prices from other points across the world. Most of them are enviably much cheaper than here. It's not uncommon to pay $2.99 for name brand squishy-white, commodity supermarket bread here, so the price for artisan loaves is, of course, even higher. Also it's not a mainstream thing. There is artisan bread available but it's like a niche foodie thing instead of an everyday thing around here. I'm lucky to live in an area where I can get a variety of very good breads and other foods. Many areas around here and in the US, generally, are not so lucky.

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Yeah, prices are pretty variable. I took a photo of the LCD advertising on a gas pump a couple of years ago to make my US colleagues jealous: One of the three door-crasher prices they advertised was live lobsters at $5.99/lb. 

 

One colleague commented that she didn't know which was more shocking...the crazy-low price of the lobsters, or the crazy-high price of the milk and bread. I didn't have the heart to tell her that those were lower-than-supermarket prices. 

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Posted (edited)
On 20/3/2017 at 7:06 PM, Thanks for the Crepes said:

Has anyone ever heard of "Pane di Casa"? Is this a real style of bread or just marketing speak? Any idea how to pronounce the "Pane" part of the name? pane/pa-nay/pan?

 

As John said it means house bread but honestly I would say pane della casa meaning Bread made in the house and that's the name I would expect if you go to a restaurant where they bake in the house their own bread, pane di casa instead to me suggests more a home style bread but at that point maybe I like more the name they have at Eataly: pane rustico. For the pronunciation, Italian is so easy, you always read it as you write it...so in English linguinE, fettuccinE is alway misproununced. 


Edited by Franci (log)
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1 hour ago, Franci said:

 

For the pronunciation, Italian is so easy, you always read it as you write it...so in English linguinE, fettuccinE is alway misproununced. 

 

 

Could you explain further?

 

In PM if necessary so not as to derail our bread.

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Could you explain further?

 

Yes, @Franci. Thank you so much for responding. I value your knowledge of Italian cuisine very much, but I am still unclear on how one would say the Italian word "pane". pan-E? Is this correct? I think we can all learn something here about the Italian word for bread on the Bread Topic. :)

 

There are also videos that follow the pane pronunciation one that are very enlightening and pertain to Italian food pronunciations. I found that I have been saying several of them incorrectly. :$ Here is a good one with a very cute little Italian lady as your guide. This video is proof, at least to me, that Italian is not at all easy to native English speakers. Spanish seems much easier to me.

 

Also, Franci and others, what is your opinion of this site on Italian breads. There is one that looks somewhat like the one I am loving so much that they call "pane casareccio" and claim it is from the Lazio region.

 

I cannot believe they get the crust so thick and crunchy and still the insides are so moist, light and tender. I put mine in a plastic bag and seal it up to soften the crust up, as it is quite challenging to bite and chew at first. The second day, the interior gives up some moisture to soften the crackly, tough crust, and each day down the line, the crust becomes softer. The bread has no preservatives, though, so it needs to be eaten in a few days. I love this bread my purveyor calls Pane di Casa!


Edited by Thanks for the Crepes (log)

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On 3/23/2017 at 0:57 AM, Thanks for the Crepes said:

 

Yes, @Franci. Thank you so much for responding. I value your knowledge of Italian cuisine very much, but I am still unclear on how one would say the Italian word "pane". pan-E? Is this correct? I think we can all learn something here about the Italian word for bread on the Bread Topic. :)

 

 

Yes, correct!

 

As for the second video, the cute girl, of course she says thinks right but she doesn't have a very neutral accent for me (I can hear the Southern accent) and it's funny she says scampi and put a photo for shrimps (scampi in Italian is langostine).

I really like the video with the 2 guys. Very good. When he talks about carbonara is clearly explain how easy it's to pronounce vowels in Italian. The only tricky part are some sounds that are not there in English. Gn, gl, and there are only a couple rules for how h transforms into guttural sounds c, g but that's it, it's very very easy.

 

Yes, pane casareccio is a common term, to say rustic. Home style. On that website they say rosetta from Lazio but in my mind is michetta from Milan (I just love and miss so much that bread. Differently than rosetta, michetta, is completely empty inside, no crums and very light, nutty crust). Pane di Laterza also doesn't look like that, I love it because it's where I'm from. Also durum.

For something similar to your pane di casa, you could try a recipe from my friend Adriano for cafone napoletano. He is own this business, which I wish him a lot of success.

 

 

 

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On 3/23/2017 at 0:00 AM, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Could you explain further?

 

In PM if necessary so not as to derail our bread.

 

 

Thanks for the Crepes did an awesome job linking the video with the 2 guys!

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image.jpeg.d364c1160c702b9487b05f2f7d2b5bd9.jpeg 

 

Yesterday evening all I really wanted was a piece of toast. I would have given my most valued possession for a slice of toast.  There was no bread in the house.  But my son was visiting and I asked him if he would pop over to the local variety store and grab me a loaf of white bread.   I said I would settle for any kind of white bread.   It was just after 5 PM.   There was no white bread in the variety store. None. Hence this rather rustic looking at loaf of bread which I made today. 

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Multigrain loaf from Thomas Keller's Bouchon book. I've made this before, but this time I left out the yeast. (Deliberately.) I added more starter than called for, since this is a heavy loaf that includes a soaker of oatmeal, sunflower seeds, sesame seeds, quinoa and other stuff I can't remember. It also ended up sitting in the fridge for two days, which I supposed didn't hurt. It's a very nice loaf. I overdid it a little with the starter, but still very nice without the yeast. 

multigrain loaf.jpg

Multigrain sliced.jpg

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On 3/21/2017 at 2:41 AM, JohnT said:

I must admit that the "normal" price you quoted is scary! This equates to R75.00 in our local currency - my, or any other artisnal bakers bread, would not sell at that price or even half that quoted price, irrelevant of how good it looked or tasted.

 

In clarification, I must say that the price I paid for this loaf of Band of Bakers brand Pane di Casa was USD $4.99 yesterday not on sale, but I did pay $5.99 this winter at a different Harris Teeter grocer. It has been worth it every time. Love this bread. It has the shiny, airy crumb, like our own @Ann_T's, who I have come to think of as the queen of yeast breads and a crackly, crusty exterior. This bread in not ordinary, and if you are able to get your hands on it, I so recommend it. It's so good, it doesn't even need butter or anything else. That is a very unusual statement for me, because I almost always slather bread with butter or a spicy olive oil dip or something.

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Here is a very passionate and readable account about the type of Italian bread variously called Pane di Casa, Pane Casereccio or Pane Cafone. I can't vouch for the no knead recipe, but it is an account of how someone else cannot get this lovely bread out of their mind once they partook of it. The one, I can get has a more open and airy, shiny crumb, but the photo on the link certainly looks like no slouch either. I can't believe how moist and tender the crumb is compared to the crust either. Just lovely.

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3 hours ago, Thanks for the Crepes said:

Here is a very passionate and readable account about the type of Italian bread variously called Pane di Casa, Pane Casereccio or Pane Cafone. I can't vouch for the no knead recipe, but it is an account of how someone else cannot get this lovely bread out of their mind once they partook of it. The one, I can get has a more open and airy, shiny crumb, but the photo on the link certainly looks like no slouch either. I can't believe how moist and tender the crumb is compared to the crust either. Just lovely.

This is the same no-knead bread that so many of us make and display in this topic. It costs pennies a loaf. 

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