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The Bread Topic (2016–)


DianaM
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Here some bread from the previous months. When I got back into sourdough, I thought I'd be more into sprouted grains, but I'm having fun with inclusions in the basic tartine loaf.

1. Salt Cured Olive

2. Fig and Anise

3. Focaccia 

4. Caramelized Shallot and Rosemary

5. Jalapeno and Smoked Cheddar

6. Raisin and Walnut

7. Marble Rye

8. Sesame

9. Chocolate (of course)

10 and 11. Baguette

 

I've definitely learned a few thing along the way. For example, the walnut raisin loaf was very dense, it didn't occur to me later that the raisins would suck up the moisture from the dough they are in, so shaping this one was a bit difficult. I made this one again, this time soaking the raisins overnight, it came out much better. Even so, that first loaf made for some good french toast.

 

Something else that I've narrowed down is a schedule for producing the loaves that doesn't impede other things I need to take care of. I'll mix the leaven the night before, make the dough in the morning and give it a few stretch and folds before I leave for work. Pull it from the fridge when I get home and give it about 1.5 hr on the counter, shape and put in the basket, wrap and back in the fridge, and bake the next morning.

 

As for the baguettes, those are the best ones I've made, but I'd like to get them a bit more defined. This was the recipe from Tartine Bread. I have a few adjustments I'll be making next time, the crumb is much tighter then I thought it would be, but I rushed the bread a little, so thats on my end.

PXL_20210317_213832533 (2).jpg

PXL_20210317_214213696 (2).jpg

PXL_20210403_161225207.jpg

PXL_20210408_195436401 (2).jpg

PXL_20210408_195912150 (2).jpg

PXL_20210408_200218018.jpg

PXL_20210411_153422412 (2).jpg

PXL_20210502_151115205 (2).jpg

PXL_20210502_151411901 (2).jpg

PXL_20210504_223307827.jpg

PXL_20210504_223358901.jpg

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12 hours ago, minas6907 said:

Here some bread from the previous months. When I got back into sourdough, I thought I'd be more into sprouted grains, but I'm having fun with inclusions in the basic tartine loaf.

1. Salt Cured Olive

2. Fig and Anise

3. Focaccia 

4. Caramelized Shallot and Rosemary

5. Jalapeno and Smoked Cheddar

6. Raisin and Walnut

7. Marble Rye

8. Sesame

9. Chocolate (of course)

10 and 11. Baguette

 

I've definitely learned a few thing along the way. For example, the walnut raisin loaf was very dense, it didn't occur to me later that the raisins would suck up the moisture from the dough they are in, so shaping this one was a bit difficult. I made this one again, this time soaking the raisins overnight, it came out much better. Even so, that first loaf made for some good french toast.

 

Something else that I've narrowed down is a schedule for producing the loaves that doesn't impede other things I need to take care of. I'll mix the leaven the night before, make the dough in the morning and give it a few stretch and folds before I leave for work. Pull it from the fridge when I get home and give it about 1.5 hr on the counter, shape and put in the basket, wrap and back in the fridge, and bake the next morning.

 

As for the baguettes, those are the best ones I've made, but I'd like to get them a bit more defined. This was the recipe from Tartine Bread. I have a few adjustments I'll be making next time, the crumb is much tighter then I thought it would be, but I rushed the bread a little, so thats on my end.

PXL_20210317_213832533 (2).jpg

PXL_20210317_214213696 (2).jpg

PXL_20210403_161225207.jpg

PXL_20210408_195436401 (2).jpg

PXL_20210408_195912150 (2).jpg

PXL_20210408_200218018.jpg

PXL_20210411_153422412 (2).jpg

PXL_20210502_151115205 (2).jpg

PXL_20210502_151411901 (2).jpg

PXL_20210504_223307827.jpg

PXL_20210504_223358901.jpg

You are a slashing expert!  Excellent!

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
53 minutes ago, minas6907 said:

Thats a cool picture. Whats your setup like for photos?

 

Thanks.  For the bread picture I used the same end grain walnut cutting block I've used for years.  This time I draped a newly acquired* black linen bath mat over the dish drainer behind, and a black linen towel over the cutting block and bath mat.  Light was two overhead kitchen ceiling bulbs.

 

I used the focus stacking technique to get the depth of field I wanted.

https://forums.egullet.org/topic/162492-camera-technology/?do=findComment&comment=2297485

 

 

*from Rough Linen in California

 

Edited by JoNorvelleWalker (log)
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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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Soft and Crispy Focaccia from Claire Saffitz's Dessert Person

IMG_4006.thumb.jpeg.f8fb667e560cb6d299f14aa45ca9a212.jpeg

I would have liked to have tried the overnight rise that she advocates for more flavor but no way does a half sheet pan fit in my side-by-side fridge.

I'll stick with Ottolenghi's recipe as I know it adapts well to whole grain flours. 

 

https://youtu.be/NGnMrM9qDtE

 

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11 minutes ago, MokaPot said:

@blue_dolphin, I've been watching "Dessert Person" on YouTube and would be interested to find out whether you've made any of her other recipes.

No, I have not. I just got the book recently and this is the first thing I’ve tried. Her videos seem to be extremely popular!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Another loaf of sourdough bread. Slice thru the center was a bit rough this time. I'm getting better at this... starting in the CSO and finishing in the regular oven to avoid burning the top of the loaf.

 

1648571153_IMG_6762-sourdoughloaf.jpg.bfe615f9f7001ff608d2bdf160dedf5a.jpg

 

1766190190_IMG_6772-sourdoughloafcut.jpg.5f13ccecce4e290397e4c54d96e960ec.jpg

 

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10 minutes ago, curls said:

Another loaf of sourdough bread. Slice thru the center was a bit rough this time. I'm getting better at this... starting in the CSO and finishing in the regular oven to avoid burning the top of the loaf.

 

1648571153_IMG_6762-sourdoughloaf.jpg.bfe615f9f7001ff608d2bdf160dedf5a.jpg

 

1766190190_IMG_6772-sourdoughloafcut.jpg.5f13ccecce4e290397e4c54d96e960ec.jpg

 

 

Really beautiful, curls.  I could devour the whole thing in a single sitting.

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-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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20 minutes ago, paul o' vendange said:

 

Really beautiful, curls.  I could devour the whole thing in a single sitting.

Paul I’d be happy to give you a few loaves so that I can bake more frequently.  🙂

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I haven't been around much.  A lifetime deep slump as to savory or pastry cooking but then that's been a long time, now.  Trying to find some enjoyment in bread baking.

 

I'm very French in most things.  Well, all things, if I'm truly honest.  Bread is no different, though my wife's family are all Estonian and I'm coming more and more to really love the vast world of rye.  (I consider grains like spelt, kamut, einkorn, in the "wheat" family.  I use a lot of spelt).

 

I'm focusing on just a few breads.  90% of my focus is on mastering a good, flagship pain au levain, following as diligently as possible the formula and method (at least at one point in time) of the late master, Gerard Rubaud.  I typically refresh the stiff chef every 5.5 hours (a tripling, or tripling +); though the day before I move to doublings - younger, more immature starter, favoring yeasts vs. LABs and thus encouraging leavening. 

 

Creating a new starter, every refreshment, every levain is salted at 1%.  This salt is of course subtracted in the main dough for a baker's percentage of salt at 2%, and an overall ratio of the main dough of 1.14%.

 

Stiff levain, 20% inoculation (I will change this through the seasons), 73% hydration, the "Rubaud Blend" (also used in all chef refreshments, and levains.  A 70:30 BF:Whole Grain blend, with that 30% being composed of 60% WW, 30% Spelt, and 10% whole rye.  Batard.

 

The other "practice" bread is simply Jeffrey Hamelman's "Vermont Sourdough."  Liquid levain, 40% inoculation, 65% hydration, 78% BF, 12% rye.  I test for hydration levels and am working to improve my own basic sourdough, which can handle 71% hydration with the flours I use (KA AP, KA WW, local whole rye).  liquid levain, 80% BF, 13% WW, 7% rye; 20% inoculation, 71% hydration.  Boule.

 

Finally, working on rye.  My guide used to be Hamelman, but now I've turned fully to Stanley Ginsberg's The Rye Baker  IMO, a wonderful book, the perfect approach for me, which is to approach regional culinary history as a natural outgrowth of the intrinsic culture, including immigrations. (Like, but much less so than, Waverly Root).  Will be first zeroing in on the dark, dense, aromatic, boldly baked ryes of Russia and the Baltics (there's my wife's family).

 

Anyway, hope you are all thriving and well, and cooking happily away.  See you soon.

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-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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2 minutes ago, curls said:

Paul I’d be happy to give you a few loaves so that I can bake more frequently.  🙂

 

You are a baker after my own heart!

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-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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3 minutes ago, paul o' vendange said:

I haven't been around much.  A lifetime deep slump as to savory or pastry cooking but then that's been a long time, now.  Trying to find some enjoyment in bread baking.

 

I'm very French in most things.  Well, all things, if I'm truly honest.  Bread is no different, though my wife's family are all Estonian and I'm coming more and more to really love the vast world of rye.  (I consider grains like spelt, kamut, einkorn, in the "wheat" family.  I use a lot of spelt).

 

Good to hear from you and I admire the thought you put into your baking process. Looking forward to your alternate grain experiments. I have not worked with rye in years though I love it. Carry on and share :)

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2 hours ago, heidih said:

Good to hear from you and I admire the thought you put into your baking process. Looking forward to your alternate grain experiments. I have not worked with rye in years though I love it. Carry on and share :)

 

Thank you Heidi, you wouldn't know but it means a lot, as does this community.

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-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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Putting together a "foundational" triad of breads to focus on, to gain better mastery in general.  The Hamelman SD above ("Erin Street SD"), top photo rear 3 loaves, a true pain au levain made old school - I am trying to emulate as much as possible the late M.Rubaud), top pic bottom left, and a good, earthy, darker, rustic rye.  In the top picture, bottom right, an Ammerländer SchwarzbrotAmmerland Black Rye Bread (with its crumb, bottom photo).  My Estonian wife is pleased to see rye again, as it's been years.

 

3 breads - that's it.  Time to practice.

 

 

IMG_0448.jpeg

ammer crumb.jpeg

Edited by paul o' vendange (log)
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-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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  • 2 weeks later...
28 minutes ago, Matthew.Taylor said:

Well, these aren’t the best looking pieces of bread I’ve ever made, but I’ll post them here anyway, in the hope to get some thoughts and advice. Clearly my skill with baguettes is still somewhat lacking.

D156C142-5284-4A9A-98BD-74502729FEE5.jpeg

533BE53E-110A-4054-B826-A92C16627FD2.jpeg

 

I haven't eaten all day, and they sure look pretty good to me!

 

If I may make suggestions, slash the loaves lengthwise, with about a third of each slash overlapping but not touching the previous slash.  Also try to find a way to introduce steam in the oven at the beginning of the bake.  Easy if you have a steam oven.  Less so otherwise.  However a bit of steam will make a big difference to the crust.

 

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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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