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The Bread Topic (2016–)


DianaM
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17 minutes ago, Norm Matthews said:

I baked my usual sour dough bread in my new-ish gas oven using the lower oven for the first time for bread.  The center came out perfectly baked but the crust was much darker and a little crustier than usual. Not that that is bad, just unexpected.  The only thing I can think that I did differently is put the egg wash on the crust a little heavier than usual. Oh another thing was I forgot to put some water in there for a little steam. I guess I will have to try some different things with this oven to see what makes a difference. 

 

@Norm Matthews a couple quick questions – is your "new-ish gas oven" a fan assisted one or just a standard non-fan gas unit? Also, what are the dimensions of your 2-up baguette tray (length x width). I am trying to find a 2-up baguette tray for a smallish boat oven and cannot find one in South Africa so trying to source one.

 

Those breads really look good!

Cape Town - At the foot of a flat topped mountain with a tablecloth covering it.

Some time ago we had Johnny Cash, Bob Hope and Steve Jobs. Now we have no Cash, no Hope and no Jobs. Please don't let Kevin Bacon die.

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Thanks Norm - the 16" is just a bit too wide for a boat oven - I will continue looking!

Cape Town - At the foot of a flat topped mountain with a tablecloth covering it.

Some time ago we had Johnny Cash, Bob Hope and Steve Jobs. Now we have no Cash, no Hope and no Jobs. Please don't let Kevin Bacon die.

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13 minutes ago, JohnT said:

Thanks Norm - the 16" is just a bit too wide for a boat oven - I will continue looking!

 I just measured mine and it’s the same size as Norm’s. 

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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Thanks Anna, I am going down to the marina on Monday or Tuesday and will take a tape measure with to see the exact width of the oven. I looked on the Internet at the producers web site, but they do not list the internal measurements of their ovens, only volume, which does not help me. I may have to get hold of my metalwork fella who makes all my baking tins and pans and get him to manufacture one for me.

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Cape Town - At the foot of a flat topped mountain with a tablecloth covering it.

Some time ago we had Johnny Cash, Bob Hope and Steve Jobs. Now we have no Cash, no Hope and no Jobs. Please don't let Kevin Bacon die.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I've been on a bread making craze for a few months now.  But I have to admit, I'm a cheat, a novice and no where near all of your expertise level of making bread.  A cheat I suppose because I started by using the artisan bread no knead bake in a dutch oven derivation.  But I have made modifications along the way.  Yet I'm still searching for the proper "inner bread hole" mystery.  In any case, fresh out of the oven this afternoon....

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The recipe calls for 3 cups of all-purpose flour and they say you don't need bread flour.  But on other recipes I see where they call for high-gluten flour, suggesting Bob's Red Mill brand.  The interior of my bread is a bit too dense I think and while it has some "holes" I'd like it to be more similar to a very good artisanal bread with the larger "holes."  Any help out there?

 

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54 minutes ago, David Ross said:

The recipe calls for 3 cups of all-purpose flour and they say you don't need bread flour.  But on other recipes I see where they call for high-gluten flour, suggesting Bob's Red Mill brand.  The interior of my bread is a bit too dense I think and while it has some "holes" I'd like it to be more similar to a very good artisanal bread with the larger "holes."  Any help out there?

 

 

It would help if you could describe how you currently make your bread, e.g. hydration level etc.

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7 minutes ago, Honkman said:

 

It would help if you could describe how you currently make your bread, e.g. hydration level etc.

I'm no scientist, but I agree high hydration and also minimal kneading will get you where you want to go. Folding instead of kneading helps.

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Yep, you need a higher hydration to get the holes. And do use a high gluten flour than AP.. A few stretch' n folds during the fermentation stage should do - then shape, proof and bakel

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Cape Town - At the foot of a flat topped mountain with a tablecloth covering it.

Some time ago we had Johnny Cash, Bob Hope and Steve Jobs. Now we have no Cash, no Hope and no Jobs. Please don't let Kevin Bacon die.

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43 minutes ago, JohnT said:

Yep, you need a higher hydration to get the holes. And do use a high gluten flour than AP.. A few stretch' n folds during the fermentation stage should do - then shape, proof and bakel

Thanks for the information.  And I'll start delving into the hydration issue.

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@David Ross you can get the holes with a 65 to 68 hydration.  You need good gluten development and a longer cold fermentation.

 

This bread was baked yesterday from a dough that had been made on Saturday and left in the fridge until yesterday morning.

68% hydration.  I have another 500g batch in the fridge made the same day that I'll probably bake tomorrow.  Also 68%.

 

5ac3a97a7fe6a_OsterovenfirstbreadbakeApril2nd2018sliced.thumb.jpg.e49d12a86969a2fc0032c709a3a83dc8.jpg

Sliced while still warm.

5ac3a98527f03_OsterovenfirstbreadbakeApril3rd2018.thumb.jpg.8b48a08c9b9e5949c552df518ee6988c.jpg

Sliced this morning for toast.

 

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50 minutes ago, Ann_T said:

@David Ross you can get the holes with a 65 to 68 hydration.  You need good gluten development and a longer cold fermentation.

 

This bread was baked yesterday from a dough that had been made on Saturday and left in the fridge until yesterday morning.

68% hydration.  I have another 500g batch in the fridge made the same day that I'll probably bake tomorrow.  Also 68%.

 

5ac3a97a7fe6a_OsterovenfirstbreadbakeApril2nd2018sliced.thumb.jpg.e49d12a86969a2fc0032c709a3a83dc8.jpg

Sliced while still warm.

5ac3a98527f03_OsterovenfirstbreadbakeApril3rd2018.thumb.jpg.8b48a08c9b9e5949c552df518ee6988c.jpg

Sliced this morning for toast.

 

Oh my oh my!  I'll be on that later today and thanks for the hydration ratio.  I admit I had no clue about that but this thread has sure helped.  And I'd much rather make that type of sumptuous bread at home than traipse over to the market and spend $5 bucks for it.  And it wouldn't be that fresh.

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12 grain bread, started with poolish and a soaker.   Had some for lunch today for grilled cheese sandwiches which had a blend of two cheeses - an Irish one called Claddagh Bo  and a local one, Těte à Papineau.  The inside of the sandwich had been spread with some caramelized onions.  Good stuff.

20180405_165846.jpg

Edited by ElsieD (log)
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Multigrain bread from the King Arthur recipe collection. Didn't have white whole wheat flour, so I used sprouted wheat flour. Very good.20180407_070635.thumb.jpg.faad757c4c77c273cf383b596a4f2bbd.jpg

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Using the Oster French Door oven  with a new  stone to bake bread.

 

Dough was made yesterday and left in the fridge overnight.

5acd00e659411_BaguettesintheOsternewstoneApril10th20184.thumb.jpg.5eeeab57c5f2a49c95a547dcf6a77387.jpg

 

Oven and stone big enough to bake three large baguettes at the same time.

5acd0107d9a63_BaguettesintheOsternewstoneApril10th20185.thumb.jpg.89e78c1daf4f6ed2366b2a3d59014f0a.jpg

5acd35f4bafac_BaguettesintheOsternewstoneApril10th20187.thumb.jpg.43dbe825922b6eb357fe80e5fac64f1c.jpg

 

ETA: a crumb shot. The hydration on this batch was 68%.

 

Edited by Ann_T (log)
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@keychris, what I wouldn't give for one of your croissants right about now. 

 

Still testing out the Oster.

Baked a large round in a Dutch Oven.  Even my Waring that died couldn't not accommodate a Dutch Oven with the lid on.   The more I use this oven, the more impressed I am with it.

 

5ad36b5a023fe_DutchOvenApril11th2018.thumb.jpg.aff1e95484d9c768f8befb133ea0d27c.jpg

 

Removed the lid after the first 30 minutes.

5ad36b44506d9_DutchOvenApril11th20181.thumb.jpg.0f7abbafb3bfda45a23b0a5f33286022.jpg

 

5ad36bbaf2fa7_DutchOvenRoundslicedApril12th20182.thumb.jpg.e8e32dfe41d69fbfdd122522ebfc4f14.jpg

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