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Okanagancook

Taste and technique

85 posts in this topic

I made the roasted carrots and pan fried mushrooms.  Liked both but why is the carrot recipe for 8 people?

i made 1/4 of a recipe, sheesh.  I like the addition of Parmesan shavings to the mushrooms.  I used button mushrooms because I do not get fresh wild mushrooms here.

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Posted (edited)

I tried the recipe for Crispy Brussels Sprouts with Pickled Mustard Seeds.  The combination of flavors is delicious.  The cooking instructions are for the birds.  The recipe can be found here.

 

We are instructed to preheat the broiler (no temperature specified) and place the oven rack as close to the heat source as possible.  The sprouts are to be halved, tossed with olive oil, S&P and placed into the broiler for 6 minutes (we are reminded to set a timer), stirred about and returned for 6 more minutes.  At that point, we add the pickled mustard seeds and give them.  Now, I knew full well this protocol would result in cinders but the author was so precise about it that I figured I'd give it a try.  

 

Here are my sprouts, 30 seconds into the first broiler session:

IMG_4309.jpg

 

I pulled off the leaves that were really incinerated, dropped the temp, lowered the rack, gave them 4 minutes, flipped them over for 2 more minutes and added the mustard seeds:

IMG_4310.jpg

After discarding the outer leaves, the rest were quite good, aside from the bigger ones being still a bit hard in the middle.   

I can and will do a better job of cooking these in the CSO but I figured I'd give the carefully detailed protocol a try.  Sheesh!

 

Edited to add that the mustard seeds are nice.  The recipe uses much more sugar than any others I've seen so it makes for a fairly sweet condiment that will limit its usefulness for me.  Though it was very nice in this dish and I can imagine other things that might work but, for example, I thought they might be a nice garnish for deviled eggs - no.  I tried and they are way too sweet.  The cooking time was a bit off as well, taking well over an hour to thicken, compared to the 25-35 minutes stated in the recipe.  I used a rather low simmer and am sure that cranking it up would cut down on the time.


Edited by blue_dolphin to describe mustard seeds (log)

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 Bet you did not use the required Guatemalan salt.  Might have made all the difference :P

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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5 minutes ago, Anna N said:

 Bet you did not use the required Guatemalan salt.  Might have made all the difference :P

 

You would win that bet!  Nor did I practice the recommended "aerial salting technique."  I don't have the book and don't know what "aerial salting" involves but images of a trapeze, safety harnesses or perhaps drones come to mind xD!

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The cooking instructions in this book seem to be troublesome as I also have found.

I made the stock and while it is very good, it is also very expensive to make because there is a lot of meat called for.  I am making a stock today from another book and this stock is bone and vegetable based so I shall be interested to compare the two.

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Bones have very little flavor on their own. They contribute body to stocks, but not much in the way of taste. Home cooks often overlook the importance of flesh in making a flavorful stock and opt for meatless bones or well-picked carcasses. Even then, few use enough bones to yield a stock worth making. The easiest way to make a powerful stock is to use cuts that have a good balance of flavorful meat and bones... things like chicken wings/thighs, oxtails, short ribs, shank meat, and neck bones. These contain enough meat to give you flavor and enough collagen to give body to the stock. If I ever make a stock with just bones, I'll add ground meat to up the flavor. And if I ever make a stock with just meat (like when there's a crazy sale on chicken breasts), I'll throw in some feet to add body. At any rate, the ratio of water to bones/meat should approximate 1:1... add water until the bones are just barely covered. Lots of bones, lots of meat, little water... excellent stock.

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On December 24, 2016 at 10:34 PM, Okanagancook said:

I made the roasted carrots and pan fried mushrooms.  Liked both but why is the carrot recipe for 8 people?

i made 1/4 of a recipe, sheesh.  I like the addition of Parmesan shavings to the mushrooms.  I used button mushrooms because I do not get fresh wild mushrooms here.

Wow.  I just read through the recipe with a view to making it and wondered why the need to finish it in a stainless steel pan after starting it in a black steel pan. Is it the little bit of vinegar she's worried about. I don't know? I think I need a sous chef/human dishwasher beside me to work with this book!  

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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1 hour ago, btbyrd said:

Bones have very little flavor on their own. They contribute body to stocks, but not much in the way of taste. Home cooks often overlook the importance of flesh in making a flavorful stock and opt for meatless bones or well-picked carcasses. Even then, few use enough bones to yield a stock worth making. The easiest way to make a powerful stock is to use cuts that have a good balance of flavorful meat and bones... things like chicken wings/thighs, oxtails, short ribs, shank meat, and neck bones. These contain enough meat to give you flavor and enough collagen to give body to the stock. If I ever make a stock with just bones, I'll add ground meat to up the flavor. And if I ever make a stock with just meat (like when there's a crazy sale on chicken breasts), I'll throw in some feet to add body. At any rate, the ratio of water to bones/meat should approximate 1:1... add water until the bones are just barely covered. Lots of bones, lots of meat, little water... excellent stock.

What you said is the way I usually make stock but I thought I would try this recipe out of Cooking the Nouvelle Cuisine in America.  I have never made a stock with just bones before and am curious because of the forward in the book.  Once reduced to about 1 pint it is their glace de viande which is used throughout their recipes.  They say it is essential to make the glace.  So I just thought I would try it and see how it turns out.  I agree about the addition of meat really making a stock flavourful.  I am also trying a new technique:  using a "Chefalarm" in the stock to ensure it stays between 190 and 200 degrees F.  Usually when making stock over a longer period of time, I come back to the pot to discover it has come to a higher simmer than I want or it has gone too low.  With the upper and lower alarm I can relax today.

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I felt compelled to revive this thread after reading the reviews and comments about Taste and Technique in this year's Piglet over at Food52.  It is getting a lot more love over there.  Admittedly I started to skim a bit, but I didn't see any of the issues raised in this thread mentioned there.  I think it has an uphill battle ahead of it, but it could win.  Go figure.

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My library just got this in and I was first on the hold list so I've had it for a couple of days.  I agree with the annoyances that have been posted previously.  My own experience with the brussels sprouts cooking directions that I knew would produce a poor result don't make me confident about following directions for other recipes.  For now, I've decided to enjoy reading - the photos are lovely!

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