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Cuisinart Combo Steam/Convection Oven (Part 3)


JoNorvelleWalker
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4 hours ago, Smithy said:

I tried a recipe for ciabatta from Nick Malgieri's cookbook, A Baker's Tour. This book jumped into my bag at some library book sale or other, but I've never gotten beyond admiring and aspiring until now.

 

I acquired the same book in much the same way, except in my case I believe it was a thrift store find. Don't recall if I've ever opened it. I suppose I should, at some point...

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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52 minutes ago, chromedome said:

 

I acquired the same book in much the same way, except in my case I believe it was a thrift store find. Don't recall if I've ever opened it. I suppose I should, at some point...

 

When you do, I'll be interested to know your opinion.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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26 minutes ago, Smithy said:

 

When you do, I'll be interested to know your opinion.

 

26 minutes ago, Smithy said:

 

When you do, I'll be interested to know your opinion.

His Italian Dessert book is a favorite of mine.

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8 hours ago, Smithy said:

 

When you do, I'll be interested to know your opinion.

Truthfully, I can't recall the last time I actually used a recipe from a cookbook. Mostly I just read them for pleasure.

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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As a change from grilling bluefish on my Philips grill I decided to try the CSO.  The instruction booklet suggests Steam Broil at 500F.  Never had I used Steam Broil before.  In went the fish.  Then the CSO started beeping, asking me to add water.  The water reservoir was full.

 

I could not ignore the little oven was trying to tell me something.  Then I noticed the fillet was touching the roof of the oven.  I moved the pan to the lower broil position, restarted, and everything went well.

 

But from now on I think I'll stick to the Philips grill for bluefish.

 

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On 8/5/2019 at 7:40 AM, chromedome said:

Truthfully, I can't recall the last time I actually used a recipe from a cookbook. Mostly I just read them for pleasure.

Maybe the first time I make something

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On 8/4/2019 at 11:17 PM, Kerry Beal said:

 

His Italian Dessert book is a favorite of mine.

Nick was my pastry and baking teacher at Peter Kump's NY Cooking School (pre-ICE), oh those many years ago.

 

Nice guy, sweetheart, and quite a dessert expert.

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12 hours ago, Okanagancook said:

No, but I think it would work a treat...something like 190f for 3 to 6 minutes??

let us know what you did.

 

I used super steam, 400F for 7 minutes.  I made 3 sandwiches.  I made 2 the first time and used 350F for 5 minutes.  The meat, while warm, could have been warmer so for the 3rd sandwich I used 400F for 5 minutes although I think 7 minutes would be better.   This smoked meat was amazing, nice and juicy.   The place we bought the meat from is called       https://www.seedtosausage.ca    and they make everything themselves.

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57 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

That’s a great idea to use steam for reheating deli meat.  I am guessing you had around 3 Oz of meat per sandwich. ...first time there was 6 Oz or so in the oven?

 

 

The first time it was probably more like 10 oz.  I had a mini sandwich, John had his on a bigger bun.  There was a bit left the first time and naybe 3 oz. was added to  for the second sandwich, also on a bigger bun.  There is about 4 ounces left from about 17 ounces of meat.  Sorry I can't be more accurate.

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This batch of irresistible peppers from a local produce stand....

 

20190826_095003.jpg

 

...went into the CSO at 425F, steam bake, 30 minutes, and turned once midway through...

 

20190826_094731.jpg

 

...thence into a covered bowl to steam and cool down. (I removed the lid just long enough for the picture.)

 

20190826_095536.jpg

 

What an easy, nonmessy way to blister peppers so I can skin them! There's a bit of char also, which should help with the resulting flavor. When we're traveling I do this over a campfire, but I think the steam function of the steam bake may have helped loosen the skin more. 

 

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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We saw a dish on The Kitchen this weekend that I'm going to try out.  They grilled it, though, and I want to cook it in the CSO.  Basically stuffed chicken breasts.  Not rolled up - pocket cut into breast halves and then stuffed and tied.  I'm planning on 375F for 35-ish minutes.  Any ideas?  Maybe bake/steam?  What temp?  How long?  Not starting until later, so there's time for debate! 😁  Ta!

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23 minutes ago, Kim Shook said:

We saw a dish on The Kitchen this weekend that I'm going to try out.  They grilled it, though, and I want to cook it in the CSO.  Basically stuffed chicken breasts.  Not rolled up - pocket cut into breast halves and then stuffed and tied.  I'm planning on 375F for 35-ish minutes.  Any ideas?  Maybe bake/steam?  What temp?  How long?  Not starting until later, so there's time for debate! 😁  Ta!

 

I would do sous vide.  I've only done stuffed chicken breast that I pounded out a bit, stuffed and rolled not as you've described but I still think it's the way to go.

Edited to add that I usually go with 145 -150°F,  measure thickness and check the pasteurization table for poultry on Douglas Baldwin's site, usually something in the 1.5 hr range

Edited by blue_dolphin
to add time & temp (log)
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1 hour ago, Kim Shook said:

We saw a dish on The Kitchen this weekend that I'm going to try out.  They grilled it, though, and I want to cook it in the CSO.  Basically stuffed chicken breasts.  Not rolled up - pocket cut into breast halves and then stuffed and tied.  I'm planning on 375F for 35-ish minutes.  Any ideas?  Maybe bake/steam?  What temp?  How long?  Not starting until later, so there's time for debate! 😁  Ta!

 

This is not exactly the same preparation, but I have made these pocket-stuffed chicken breasts a few times, and they come out well as written:

 

https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/chicken-with-herbed-goat-cheese-recipe-1914098

 

Not sure if you've already bought your chicken, but the bones and skin do a pretty good job of shielding the meat.

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Well, as far as the recipe went, it was meh (reported on the dinner thread).  BUT, as far as the CSO went, it was a huge success.  The boneless, skinless chicken breasts were salted and left, uncovered, in the fridge for an hour and then cooked at 400F on Bake/Steam.  They were incredibly moist and tender.  They would have been perfect for chicken salad.  They were better than the breasts I've done in the IP and I didn't have to get that out or clean anything since I covered the CSO pan in non-stick foil.  :wub:

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2 hours ago, ElsieD said:

Has anyone ever tried to "blanch" corn in the CSO using the 210F steam function?

I have not.  But nor am I certain what it means to "blanch" corn.  Are we talking whole cobs? Trays of raw kernels?  How is the blanched corn used?

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I want to blanch the whole cob, cool it quickly in ice water, cut the kernels off, vacuum pack thd kernels and freeze them in portion sized bags.  They will be eaten over the winter months.

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FWIW -- Having been a participant in the freezing of hundreds of bushels of corn over the course of my life, here's how we did it, and I still do it:

 

Cut off the kernels and scrape the cobs.

"Blanch," though it's not a true blanch, the kernels over medium heat for maybe five minutes.

Portion into bags, express as much air as possible, seal and freeze.

 

It's not necessary to vacuum seal. We would simply (and I still do) squeeze out as much air as possible before sealing.

 

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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We used to use a big aluminum dishpan. Any broader-than-it-is-deep cooking vessel will do. I have used a Dutch oven, but you have to stir constantly to get the bottom layers up to the top. I finally settled on my big enameled turkey roaster pan.

 

I don't season at all. I may add a little water if it seems like it wants to stick. Then when I'm ready to cook, I add butter, salt and pepper.

 

Edited by kayb (log)
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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Alright, even though we're in pre-moving mode, I just bit the bullet and got one... due to arrive on Wednesday.  I got it now rather than after we've moved primarily to test out the various things that we'd typically use a microwave for - to make sure we don't need to actually get a microwave....  I'm looking forward to putting it through its paces!

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