Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

suzilightning

What food-related books are you reading? (2016 -)

Recommended Posts

The Up-To-Date Sandwich Book: 400 Ways to Make a Sandwich, by Eva Green Fuller; 1909

Available here from the excellent Public Domain Review. (PDF)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Herve This, Molecular Gastronomy.  From the preface:  "We worry about making good French fries:  here we read that there is laboratory predictability in the choice of potato variety, the slicing technique, and the discoloration that occurs when enzymes in the air hit the uncooked spud."

 

This may be a long slog.  Excuse me while I go change the filter on the air conditioner.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Herve This, Molecular Gastronomy.  From the preface:  "We worry about making good French fries:  here we read that there is laboratory predictability in the choice of potato variety, the slicing technique, and the discoloration that occurs when enzymes in the air hit the uncooked spud."

 

This may be a long slog.  Excuse me while I go change the filter on the air conditioner.

 

Hmmm. You might need a good supply of MR to wash it down.   On the other hand you have a very solid science background and might do better with this than I would likely do.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Hmmm. You might need a good supply of MR to wash it down.   On the other hand you have a very solid science background and might do better with this than I would likely do.  

 

Now that I've gotten rid of the plague of flies, there are very few enzymes in the air to be attacking my potatoes.

 

It would seem the person who wrote the preface does not have a solid grasp of something.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, FrogPrincesse said:

@JoNorvelleWalkerWhat is the original French title of the book? I have a bunch of his books, and was wondering which one that might be. Thanks! 

 

 

Caldrons and Test Tubes I think he said.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Caldrons and Test Tubes I think he said.

 

Casseroles et Eprouvettes (pots and graduated cylinders). You were close! :D

I don't think I have this one.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Just started 'Real Food Fake Food' by Larry Olmstead.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just finished Pig Perfect by Peter Kaminsky, which made me want to buy expensive ham and Ossabaw pork.  Then I started Meathooked by Marta Zaraska, which has me reconsidering - or at least feeling a little guilty.  I was surprised to find a local source for Ossabaw but they won't be available for at least a month.  Maybe if I hurry up and finish Meathooked I'll be over it in time.

 


Edited by rustwood (log)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ronni Lundy's "Butterbeans to Blackberries, Recipes from the Southern Garden."  Southerners seem more attached to the foods of their childhoods than just about anyone. No one but a Southerner would rhapsodize so about string beans, and no one else could convince me that cooking them for an hour and a half until they pretty much dissolve in bacon grease would be a truly great treat. But I believe her! I'm ready to make them.

 

Really entertaining read, with lots of asides, stories, historical tidbits and personal reflections. Also the chapters are hilarious. Okra is so beloved that despite only starring in three or four recipes it gets its own chapter. So does corn. This is a really sweet book, and I'm marking more recipes than I thought I would. Ready to order Sorghum on Amazon!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 20/08/2016 at 9:57 AM, Thanks for the Crepes said:

 

For those of us who might not be able to find the actual print copy, here is a very amusing website: The Gallery of Regrettable Foods. I believe it is by the author of ElainaA's book. Here is a sample page. Certainly not high-brow, like many of you have posted, but I can guarantee it's interesting, revolting, and you will get a laugh out of it. :D

 

 

I love that site. I first tripped across it years ago when I lived in Edmonton, and wound up spending four of my only six potential sleeping hours there that night (never a good idea to "poke around on the internet while I wind down"). The related fashion and decor pages are equally fun -- I remember some of those ghastly combinations from my 70s childhood -- but the funniest of all was his tribute to The Gobbler, "the grooviest hotel in Wisconsin."

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just finished Restaurant Man by Joe Bastianich I liked it, but many amazon reviewers found it to be too profane and self-aggrandizing.


Edited by Lisa Shock amazon links getting messed up (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just finished Hot Bread Kitchen and Polpo. I wasn't as impressed as others. I can't believe Hot Bread Kitchen won Food52's cookbook of the year.

 

My next cookbook will be The London Cookbook. I'm looking forward to it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/16/2016 at 0:09 PM, Smokeydoke said:

Just finished Hot Bread Kitchen and Polpo. I wasn't as impressed as others. I can't believe Hot Bread Kitchen won Food52's cookbook of the year.

 

My next cookbook will be The London Cookbook. I'm looking forward to it.

I, too, was unimpressed with Hot Bread Kitchen, especially after neither of the recipes that I tried worked well. And I wondered what the Food52 judges had been smoking when they kept pushing it through their contest. It was great fun to read, but that's only half of what makes a cookbook good, IMHO.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, MelissaH said:

I, too, was unimpressed with Hot Bread Kitchen, especially after neither of the recipes that I tried worked well. And I wondered what the Food52 judges had been smoking when they kept pushing it through their contest. It was great fun to read, but that's only half of what makes a cookbook good, IMHO.

 The book Hot Bread Kitchen has a number of serious errata which will apparently be fixed with the next printing. Doesn't help you at all, I realize. But I made two breads from the book and both of them were amazing.  Too bad they didn't print an errata as soon as they were made aware of the errors. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Anna N said:

 The book Hot Bread Kitchen has a number of serious errata which will apparently be fixed with the next printing. Doesn't help you at all, I realize. But I made two breads from the book and both of them were amazing.  Too bad they didn't print an errata as soon as they were made aware of the errors. 

In this day and age, there's no excuse to at least make the errata available on the web, both on your own website and on the pages for major online sellers such as Amazon.

 

As an editor, I'd like to know where things went wrong!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, MelissaH said:

In this day and age, there's no excuse to at least make the errata available on the web, both on your own website and on the pages for major online sellers such as Amazon.

 

As an editor, I'd like to know where things went wrong!

It was apparently a math problem!  Converting between volume and mass. The same problem that doomed Ferran Adrià's The Family Meal.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't get me started about math and volume–mass conversions. Grrrrrrr.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×