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Instant Pot. Multi-function cooker (Part 4)

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20 hours ago, Shelby said:

I have never had a failure this way:

 

1 cup of cold tap water

Place eggs on trivet that came with the IP

Low pressure

5 minutes

Natural release (usually takes 5-8 mins)

Put eggs in cold water bath

 

@Shelby I tried this today and it came out exactly the way I wanted it with a nice dry type of yolk.  Thanks so much for helping me out.  @rotuts  thank you for chiming in as well.  I would have tried your method as well but I didn't want any "jel" in my yolk. 

 

 

20161214_113347.jpg


Edited by ElsieD added @Shelby and fixed 2 typos (log)
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7 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

 

@Shelby I tried this today and it came out exactly the way I wanted it with a nice dry type of yolk.  Thanks so much for helping me out.  @rotuts  thank you for chiming in as well.  I would have tried your method as well but I didn't want any "jel" in my yolk. 

 

 

20161214_113347.jpg

 

Oh good!  So happy to help :) I'm just getting ready to make some right now.  

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4 hours ago, HungryChris said:

 I am glad to read that we share a clear set of established priorities! And I try to buy fresh clams if I am thinking ahead, but always try to have canned clams on hand for just such an occasion. 

HC

 I so wanted to ask if you had used canned clams but was deeply afraid I might offend.  I am as likely to be able to source fresh clams as I am to source hens' teeth so I was awfully glad to find out I could make this dish with canned clams. 

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On 11/27/2016 at 4:10 PM, jmolinari said:

Question, i thought i had noticed with my stovetop PC that if i quick release meats they tend to be much drier, and from a physics standpoint it makes sense. When it's under pressure the liquids in the meat are in liquid form. When you quick release the liquid instantly boils, including the liquid in the meat itself and would tend to "blow out" of the meat pieces. 

Has anyone noticed this quick releasing stews and chicken and stuff?

 

 

I've heard this theory before, but I have not found it to be true, either with my stovetop PC or Cuisinart electric pressure cooker or Instant Pot. I did side-by-side comparisons with pork tenderloin and chicken breast while I was researching my latest cookbook (which is for the Instant Pot specifically). In each case, I cooked half with a short cook time and some natural release time, and half with a slightly longer time and quick release of pressure. The internal temps were virtually identical (around 145F for the pork and 150F for the chicken), the amount of liquid seemed similar, and my dinner guests couldn't tell any difference between them. I've also cooked pot roast both ways -- with a quick release and with a natural release -- and didn't notice any difference in how moist the meat was.

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7 hours ago, Shelby said:

  It's lacking something that I can't put my finger on, but it was perfectly acceptable.

 

 

A whiff of anchovy, perhaps? The long-ago Italian friend who introduced me to linguine and clams insisted that anchovies were at least as important as the clams, and perhaps a titch more so. 

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1 minute ago, chromedome said:

 

A whiff of anchovy, perhaps? The long-ago Italian friend who introduced me to linguine and clams insisted that anchovies were at least as important as the clams, and perhaps a titch more so. 

It's funny you say that...it crossed my mind that it needed more "umph"  or umami or something.  Thank you, I'll try that next time.

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Dear husband is out of town and I can eat awful offal if I want to.  And I do ;)

tripe cooked twice.  First time just brought to pressure with water and a bit of vinegar, rinsed, cooked again with stock for 45 minutes high pressure.  It was cut in large pieces prior to cooking.  In the photo it is cut into smaller pieces to be added to fried rice. Pleasantly chewy texture.

 

image.jpg

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5 minutes ago, chefmd said:

Dear husband is out of town and I can eat awful offal if I want to.  And I do ;)

tripe cooked twice.  First time just brought to pressure with water and a bit of vinegar, rinsed, cooked again with stock for 45 minutes high pressure.  It was cut in large pieces prior to cooking.  In the photo it is cut into smaller pieces to be added to fried rice. Pleasantly chewy texture.

 

image.jpg

I would hit the like button a million times if I could on this.  yum.

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Another boiled egg question: I have 60 quail eggs to boil tomorrow, and I think I'll do them in the IP for, hopefully, ease in peeling. Due to the size differential, I find putting them in cold water stovetop, bringing to a boil, turning off, and letting them sit about six minutes yields a very nice hardboiled egg. Any thoughts on how I'd adjust that for the IP? I'm thinking if it's five for regular eggs, then perhaps three for quail eggs?

 

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16 minutes ago, kayb said:

Another boiled egg question: I have 60 quail eggs to boil tomorrow, and I think I'll do them in the IP for, hopefully, ease in peeling. Due to the size differential, I find putting them in cold water stovetop, bringing to a boil, turning off, and letting them sit about six minutes yields a very nice hardboiled egg. Any thoughts on how I'd adjust that for the IP? I'm thinking if it's five for regular eggs, then perhaps three for quail eggs?

 

I'd go even less.  Remember it takes heat to get to pressure......

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My mom's friends just gave her a 6 qt Instant Pot for her birthday, and since she is currently staying with me that means I get to play with it. Win!

 

Also it gives me an opportunity for another Christmas gift for her - anyone have any IP specific cookbook recommendations? Must have accessories? (I am probably going to get her the glass lid for sure.) Bonus points if the cookbook has nutritional info since my mom needs to watch her sodium.

 

Also, has anyone translated the non-English recipes in the book that comes with the IP? They look interesting.

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3 hours ago, quiet1 said:

Also it gives me an opportunity for another Christmas gift for her - anyone have any IP specific cookbook recommendations? Must have accessories? (I am probably going to get her the glass lid for sure.) Bonus points if the cookbook has nutritional info since my mom needs to watch her sodium.

 

For a cookbook, I highly recommend @pazzaglia's Hip Pressure Cooking, however it does not contain the sort of nutritional breakdown for each recipe that you need.

 

Over on one of the IP Facebook groups, someone posted a link to this list of accessories that may be helpful for new IP users.  If you look through the list, you'll probably spot many items that you or your mom already have. 

 

Some sort of steamer basket is very helpful.  A small springform pan is nice for cheesecakes or other desserts.  I find the little silicone IP mitts to be very handy.  An extra silicone gasket may be a good idea - many people keep one for savory, onion/garlicky dishes and one for more neutral dishes or desserts.

She may not need the glass lid - I have a lid from another pan that fits very well. 


Edited by blue_dolphin (log)
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4 hours ago, palo said:

If you go to their site you should be able to download an english copy of the manual that also includes recipes, just pick your model.

 

http://instantpot.com/benefits/specifications-and-manuals/

 

p

 

Right, but if you look at them, it does not look like they have the same recipes. The cookbook that came with the IP has both, and the Chinese recipe pictures look intriguing.

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3 minutes ago, quiet1 said:

 

Right, but if you look at them, it does not look like they have the same recipes. The cookbook that came with the IP has both, and the Chinese recipe pictures look intriguing.

 I seem to recall that if you go to the website of the author of the Chinese recipes you will find an English version there.   It has been a while so I hope I'm not wrong. I'm sorry I don't have time to check right this minute.

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1 hour ago, Anna N said:

 I seem to recall that if you go to the website of the author of the Chinese recipes you will find an English version there.   It has been a while so I hope I'm not wrong. I'm sorry I don't have time to check right this minute.

 

That's right.  If you go to this link on her site, you can find many of the recipes in the Chinese IP cookbook.  I'm not sure every recipe is there but many are.

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For some reason it never would have occurred to me to check the author websites, thanks!

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On 12/14/2016 at 4:33 PM, JAZ said:

 

I've heard this theory before, but I have not found it to be true, either with my stovetop PC or Cuisinart electric pressure cooker or Instant Pot. I did side-by-side comparisons with pork tenderloin and chicken breast while I was researching my latest cookbook (which is for the Instant Pot specifically). In each case, I cooked half with a short cook time and some natural release time, and half with a slightly longer time and quick release of pressure. The internal temps were virtually identical (around 145F for the pork and 150F for the chicken), the amount of liquid seemed similar, and my dinner guests couldn't tell any difference between them. I've also cooked pot roast both ways -- with a quick release and with a natural release -- and didn't notice any difference in how moist the meat was.

 

thanks for the reply...and very interesting. Both my friend and I have noticed the difference when quick releasing meat on a stovetop PC...but, we haven't done side by sides so we might be deceived!

 

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Last night I was making this recipe in my IP.

I struggled to sear the meat pieces since the IP just would not get hot enough.  Next time I'll sear on the stove then move to the IP. 

Is it just me?  or am I missing something?

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33 minutes ago, lindag said:

Last night I was making this recipe in my IP.

I struggled to sear the meat pieces since the IP just would not get hot enough.  Next time I'll sear on the stove then move to the IP. 

Is it just me?  or am I missing something?

Are you searing on low?  You can change it to medium or high.  High is almost too high for me unless I'm watching it really close.

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Shelby, Mine just showed 'ON', the showed 'HOT'.  I couldn't see how to make it hotter, and I did try the '+' button.

 

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3 minutes ago, lindag said:

Shelby, Mine just showed 'ON', the showed 'HOT'.  I couldn't see how to make it hotter, and I did try the '+' button.

 

When I push the 'SAUTE' button then I can push the 'ADJUST' button and that changes it to either 'LESS, NORMAL OR MORE'.  The 'LESS NORMAL OR MORE' is located right underneath the 'LOW -HIGH' pressure indicators.

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Thank you.  Apparently I need to get more familiar with my pot....maybe start with the manual?:o

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3 minutes ago, lindag said:

Thank you.  Apparently I need to get more familiar with my pot....maybe start with the manual?:o

Lol, I'm sure there are things that I don't know yet, either.  Glad I could help :)  I don't want you to have to dirty up another pan by sautéing on the stove :) 

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