Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

mudbug

Unidentified Root in Chinatown?

Recommended Posts

mudbug   

What is this root vegetable in the Asian markets please? Vietnamese use it for a dessert, Chinese use it for soup. It is not cassava or taro.

 

Any insight into phonetic pronunciation, scientific name, cultivars, use, recipes, medicinal properties, etc would be appreciated.

Screen Shot 2016-09-03 at 1.30.35 PM.jpg

Screen Shot 2016-09-03 at 1.30.14 PM.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do love a mystery.

 

I could not find an exact match. The taro I am familiar with has more pronounced circular belts around it and it has more coarse hairs coming out.

 

@mudbug's photos strike me as sweet potatoes, of which I am so proud we grow so many of here in my home state. Come to find out in my research, that the whole USA produces only 1 million tonnes of the world crop, with China producing a completely overwhelming 81.7 million tonnes! Knowledge is always good, but sometimes very  humbling, which is also probably good once one adjusts. :) 

 

Sweet potatoes come in many skin and flesh colors, which may or may not match in the same tuber.

 

Here's a link to one that has a picture that looks maybe like mudbug's images except, the one in the link is fresher and not as dried out. Here's another link from the same site with an image of a baked white sweet potato where the author says something about this variety being more perishable than other sweet potatoes.

 

I will be interested to see if a definitive answer is ever arrived at.


Edited by Thanks for the Crepes percentages to million tonnes and other ramblings (log)

> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those look like regular sweet potato with white flesh. In the Philippines we have a snack called Kamote-Q, we use that type of sweet potato, peeled, sliced an inch thick then skewered in bbq sticks. They're deep fried, and when they're halfway cooked you sprinkle brown sugar all over it and back into the deep fryer it goes till it's fully cooked and the sugar is melted and is coating the sweet potato in a thin brown sugar shell. 

image.jpeg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

There are also may types of sweet potatoes. I think those ones have been fossilised, though!

 

 

He He. Google image search (lame as always, but with such amazing promise!) identified the first image by the OP correctly as "root vegetable", and the second image as "rock". So fossil is not so far off. xD


Edited by Thanks for the Crepes (log)
  • Like 1

> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Wild_Yeast said:

Those look like regular sweet potato with white flesh. In the Philippines we have a snack called Kamote-Q, we use that type of sweet potato, peeled, sliced an inch thick then skewered in bbq sticks. They're deep fried, and when they're halfway cooked you sprinkle brown sugar all over it and back into the deep fryer it goes till it's fully cooked and the sugar is melted and is coating the sweet potato in a thin brown sugar shell. 

image.jpeg

 

I hope that deep fryer or wok is a lot easier to clean than I am imagining it to be. I can't see all the sugar staying put without coming loose into the oil.

 

That snack looks wonderful, though.

  • Like 4

> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's messy business making these at home so normally we walk out to the street hawker and let him deal with the cleanin up lol 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jaymes   
10 hours ago, Wild_Yeast said:

Those look like regular sweet potato with white flesh. In the Philippines we have a snack called Kamote-Q,

 

Like so many words used in the Philippines, Spanish is similar.  Although there are several terms for "sweet potatoes" in Spanish, in Mexico and the US Southwest, the most-often heard is "camote."  

  • Like 3

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Beebs   

Aka. Arrowroot?  "Fen ge" in Mandarin (second link posted by Thanks for the Crepes).  Mom puts it in soup - very tasty soup, although the souped-out arrowroot is rather dry, bland & unappealing.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×