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All Under Heaven / Dim Sum Field Guide


liuzhou
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eG member @Carolyn Phillips has just published her ten-year-long-gestated Chinese cook book, All Under Heaven. 500 pages on China's 35 cuisines. Gathering rave reviews. I've ordered my copy. Can't wait.

Simultaneously, her "Dim Sum Field Guide is published.

 

She hasn't posted much here recently, but who would or could while writing two books at the same time - one of them a huge tome?

Congratulations Carolyn.


 

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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I have added All Under Heaven to my Amazon wish list where I always allow books to percolate for a while. Appears to be a labour of but I am afraid its lack of ANY photography is bound to hurt sales.  

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

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I've been taking it up to my friends though as yet our library has two copies checked in.  Everyone (Chinese and not) tells me I should have read it first before buying a copy of All Under Heaven for myself.

 

But I admit I have not yet cracked the cover.

 

 

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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All Under Heaven is my everything! I've been obsessed with regional Chinese cooking, especially the regions of China that don't get much attention in the West. I love how much of a deep cut this is of Chinese cooking. There's so much stuff in here that I'm dying to try.

PS: I am a guy.

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I've had this on hold at my public library and they've just received their two copies so I should have it in hand by early next week.

Looking forward to it after reading reviews.

 

 

I know it's stew. What KIND of stew?

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  • 3 weeks later...

I own both books. They are informative and the drawings are beautifully made and fully sufficient to support the recipes (e.g. different ways to score different fishes). In a way they fit the overall design of the book much better than some stylish photos would have.

 

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  • 3 months later...

I've been slowly working my way through All Under Heavenir?t=egulletcom-20&l=am2&o=1&a=160774982 and loving it, especially since my background knowledge on the cuisines of China is so limited. I do have one question though: looking at the index, I see no recipe for "red-cooked" anything. Is it included in the book under another name, or is there another reason for its exclusion? Am I just missing it?

Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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Indeed, there is no such recipe that I can see. However, no cookbook could possible include every dish from China, especially a book covering the whole country. It instead gives a few representative recipes from each area, with an emphasis on less well known dishes. I can think of many things which aren't included.

 

I cannot speak for the author, but I'd guess she felt that the red-cooked technique was already well known enough. There are certainly many, many recipes online.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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3 hours ago, liuzhou said:

Indeed, there is no such recipe that I can see. However, no cookbook could possible include every dish from China, especially a book covering the whole country. It instead gives a few representative recipes from each area, with an emphasis on less well known dishes. I can think of many things which aren't included.

 

I cannot speak for the author, but I'd guess she felt that the red-cooked technique was already well known enough. There are certainly many, many recipes online.

Awesome, thanks for your help! I figured that might be the case, but I wanted to make sure I wasn't just missing it.

Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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