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Dinner 2016 (Part 8)


ElainaA
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Dish determined on the fly.  Shelled the shrimp and used the shells to make stock along with lemon zest, green onion and garlic and cooked some Korean noodles in the stock.  Browned the shrimp in butter with zest, green onion and sweet basil.  Used some of the zest, onion and basil to top off the dish.  It was one of those dishes where I just said "damn, this is good, wish there was more". The shrimp were plump and sweet 

 

 

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4 hours ago, Okanagancook said:

Welcome to the Egullet-induced buying problem!  Make room in your cupboards. :)

 

 

What do you mean, welcome? The Kamado Joe Jr and the Instant Pot are also the fault of you guys :) £3.85 from eBay is petty cash. The grill and the IP were good purchases though and I hope the same is true for the cheapy spiraliser. Will have to see!

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Hiyayakko and yakisoba tonight. Only the Hiyayakko made the pics. It was hot and muggy today, the cold tofu was refreshing, the dressing is tamari, mirin, sugar and sesame oil. I dabbed just a little bit of my homemade chili garlic oil (dimsum chili garlic oil) for an extra kick. 

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Today started off somewhere between awful and horrendous.  I had a bloody nose for well over an hour, almost two, and that was breakfast.  Other stuff that is far too off topic to mention.

 

But dinner made up for it.  I had planned steak, broccolini, and baked potato.  But how can one have baked potato without sour cream?  This called for a change of plans.

 

The steak was the strip portion (I shan't say of which city) cut from a porterhouse, the mealy tenderloin of which I miscooked some days ago.  In contrast the strip was excellent:  56 deg C. after resting.  Served with better than usual mashed potato and 8 minute CSO steamed frozen and thawed English peas.  Rarely does everything turn out this right, and the wine was exceptional:  Ghost Pines 2014 Zinfandel.

 

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Pork belly & pork spare ribs stewed w/ stuff.

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Eaten w/ "hand made" min sin (min6 sin3; misua) (手工麵線) (this one).

Peanut oil, lightly crushed garlic cloves (lots), pork belly slices, pork baby back ribs, chillied fermented beancurd plus the liquids smooshed up w/ a little water. Red Thai chillies. Water to cover plus some, simmer, lid on. Sliced-up winter-type bamboo shoots, peeled daikon, small fresh thick-cap shiitake mushrooms. Simmer. Seasoning adjusted.

ETA: Dried beancurd sheets (broken into smaller pieces) also went in during the simmering.

 

Edited by huiray (log)
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Another half dozen freshly shucked, raw oysters on ice to start.

 

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A simple stir fry of chicken, mushrooms and asparagus -with rice. There are the first button mushrooms of the season here in China.

I never knew mushrooms were seasonal until I moved to China.

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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1 minute ago, kayb said:

Time and temp in the CSO? (Season starts tomorrow in Arkansas!) Did you par-boil them first? 

 

I do love a dove breast.

 

No par-boil.  In the CSO on steam bake at 425 for about 10 mins.  They got done very quickly...I'd check them at 7 mins.  Good stuff.

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5 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

What does dove taste like?  Looks to be very lean, hence the bacon wrap.

There are a few doves flying around here, hummmmm

Well, it tastes like the dark meat on a chicken.  It can get dry if you over cook it, but done right, it's very moist and tender.  I'm dying to SV some and see what we think.  The bacon is just a go-to that everyone does around here.  There is a piece of jalapeño in the cavity of the bird and the bacon holds it there.

Edited by Shelby (log)
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I do like a pigeon. (Sorry, but doves are pigeons.)

Yes, they need careful cooking, but done well as opposed to well done they are great eating.

Unfortunately, my local source hasn't had any for a while.

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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@kayb  

 

"" par-boil them first ""

 

knowing nothing about it , I thought only Emeril Lagasse  par-boils these days

 

I can say that as he is from my Neck of the Woods.

 

there was a Rib show a zillion years ago   ....    I turned it off and cleaned out the Hard Drive.

 

have a tasty weekend !

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We raised pigeons (squab) on my grandpa's farm and one of the chores we kids were given was to tend the dovecotes and "harvest" the squabs - this is when they are fully grown but don't yet have feathers.  It doesn't take long to learn how to estimate the weight by just lifting them, leaving the underweight ones to fatten a bit more.  The meat is very tender because they have never used their muscles to fly - unlike wild pigeons. 

We had 10 dovecotes and as I recall there were a dozen tiers for nesting in each one and probably 20 nests on each tier.  (We ate a lot of squab)  It was important to keep the cotes clean and well ventilated and free of vermin - rats like squab too - and so do cats so we had a couple of small "rat" terriers that were very adept at ratting in the cotes.  

My grandpa's cook made "smothered squabs" in big roasting pans with a fantastic gravy - for "company dinners"  I have the recipe in one of my recipe boxes - I will see if I can find it and will put it on my blog and if anyone is interested, will post it here too.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Roasted sweet potato and soft tofu, glazed with a mixture of soy sauce, anise and fennel seeds, ginger (juiced), a little honey,garlic, toasted sesame oil, a little miso, rice vinegar, chilly.

Served with rice with, flavored with a little garlic, anise seeds and a touch of cinnamon. Some scallions.

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~ Shai N.

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33 minutes ago, andiesenji said:

We raised pigeons (squab) on my grandpa's farm and one of the chores we kids were given was to tend the dovecotes and "harvest" the squabs - this is when they are fully grown but don't yet have feathers.  It doesn't take long to learn how to estimate the weight by just lifting them, leaving the underweight ones to fatten a bit more.  The meat is very tender because they have never used their muscles to fly - unlike wild pigeons. 

We had 10 dovecotes and as I recall there were a dozen tiers for nesting in each one and probably 20 nests on each tier.  (We ate a lot of squab)  It was important to keep the cotes clean and well ventilated and free of vermin - rats like squab too - and so do cats so we had a couple of small "rat" terriers that were very adept at ratting in the cotes.  

My grandpa's cook made "smothered squabs" in big roasting pans with a fantastic gravy - for "company dinners"  I have the recipe in one of my recipe boxes - I will see if I can find it and will put it on my blog and if anyone is interested, will post it here too.

 

 

I also used to raise utility pigeons — mostly White Kings.

Squab is great.

There are big differences between domesticated squab, wild pigeon, and mourning dove — the most common wild dove consumed around here.

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~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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I've been taking pictures but not finding time to post so here are this week's meals:

Pasta with sausage and leeks. The garden leeks are just getting large enough to use. And a plate of tomatoes and cukes - this was a tasting plate including some of each of the full size tomato varieties that I grew. We mainly eat the cherry tomatoes and I process the large ones. I wanted a taste test to decide which ones will repeat next year.

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Chicken breast baked with onions and mojito marinade from the Dinosaur Barbecue cookbook. I am afraid to think of what they are feeding these chickens - these breasts would make Dolly Parton feel inferior. With plain rice, some of the last of the local corn sauteed with shallots, seasoned with a little vinegar and a lot of basil and a tomato and cucumber salad. 

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Steak with grilled vegetables (zucchini, tomato,onion, red pepper) and oven fries.

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Pasta with tomato/roasted garlic/roasted pepper sauce. Besides last night dinner, there are 4 quarts of this in the freezer to enjoy this winter. Or sooner. There was a salad to go with.

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Edited by ElainaA (log)
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If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. Cicero

But the library must contain cookbooks. Elaina

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Some rice pasta finishing cooking on the stove for John.  I've pounded out two chicken breasts and seasoned them with my Italian spice mix.  When Himself is ready to eat I'll quickly sear the breasts in olive oil, add some yellow grape tomatoes I need to use up along with some capers then add the rewarmed pasta.  Made a salad with some local red and green leaf lettuces.  Cukes and thinly sliced red onion along with some vinaigrette.  Simple but good on a cooler day.

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Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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