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Paul Bacino

Stone Soup Bowls ( Jacama )

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Wish I could help @Paul Bacino, but your bowl is thinner, and nothing like the dolsot  used for bibimbap.

 

All searches tried to correct me to jicama when I tried jacama, and when I insisted, I got zilch. I'm bumping this up for you so someone more enlightened may see it and provide you some real help.

 

Perhaps it would be helpful to expand on the culture this comes from and a few more details?

 

Beautiful photo, as usual. I love the little fish tail sticking up!

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> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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Paul, looks very similar to what in Spain we call 'Cuencos de Calabaza', Google told me that these are gourd bowls in english. Found a couple of links on how to make them.

 

http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-clean-a-hardshell-gourd/?ALLSTEPS

 

In Spanish (If you need help with the captions let me know):

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sZ3qBNyjSdU

 

Also I found this about Jicara. That sounds pretty similar to jacama:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ioVS-ZF9A34

 

I know that you say these are stone, but looking at your photo (there are some 'ribs' and what it looks like the base of the stem) I would dare to say that they are dried calabaza or jicara.

 

Hope it helps.


Edited by cta spelling (log)
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@cta,

 

Now that you've mentioned it, Paul's bowl does look very much like the inside of gourds I used to grow up a chain link fence on the edge of a vegetable garden.

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> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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1 hour ago, cta said:

 

I know that you say these are stone, but looking at your photo (there are some 'ribs' and what it looks like the base of the stem) I would dare to say that they are dried calabaza or jicama.

 

Hope it helps.

Thanks @Thanks for the Crepes  and  @cta

 

Oaxacan Mexican culture uses these bowl types for making Stone Soup   --  a fish stew that they add 800 degree F stone into the soup to help finish the stew.   Make sense with the gourds.  So nothing would crack.

 

Maybe with fall approaching us in the Midwest USA.   Sounds like a idea.

 

Cheers   x            Bacino = the little kiss


Edited by Paul Bacino (log)
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Its good to have Morels

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Ah. Bowls in which to serve stone soup vs bowls made from stone. Now it makes sense. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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1 hour ago, Paul Bacino said:

Oaxacan Mexican culture uses these bowl types for making Stone Soup   --  a fish stew that they add 800 degree F stone into the soup to help finish the stew.   Make sense with the gourds.  So nothing would crack.

 

 

Oh, I see. Did't know that Stone Soup was a real thing. I always tought it was some kind of legend/saying:

 

From Wikipedia:

Quote

Stone Soup is an old folk story in which hungry strangers manipulate the local people of a town into sharing their food. In varying traditions, the stone has been replaced with other common inedible objects, and therefore the fable is also known as axe soup, button soup, nail soup, and wood soup.

 

But it makes sense. In Spain (more exactly Navarra) we have a dessert: cuajada (curdled milk?) and it's made the same way, throwing a hot stone in a 'bucket' made from a hollowed tree trunk full of milk. The photo gallery in this page have some images of the process and the 'buckets'

 

http://www.valledeultzama.com/dia-de-la-cuajada-valle-de-ultzama/

 

 

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When I visited Oaxaca I never saw stone soup in regular restaurants. There was a place about 20 minutes east of the city (Northern end) that everyone told us was more geared towards locals - where yes, they had big caldrons that they would drop rocks into to cook the soup. Fun idea, but when we went they were closed and our driver tried to really screw us over. 

 

That said, they look like gourds to me too, but if they are stone I'd love to find a set for myself.  For evidence that they are gourds, look at the rim of the forefront bowl and look at about 2 o'clock. You'll see an irregularity that would make sense for gourd instead of rock - on a rock that would probably have shattered.

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