Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Anna N

What Are You Preserving, and How Are You Doing It? (2016–)

Recommended Posts

I think I put too much garlic in my last batch...

 

Also, have yet to try 'bottled' Italian dressing - I sort of make my own rendition, but I would be interested (though i do not believe I can find the brand referred to up here in Canada).

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, TicTac said:

I think I put too much garlic in my last batch...

As if such a thing could exist..."too much garlic". :cool: xD

  • Like 2
  • Haha 4

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know, but in a cold brine, raw garlic can become very dominant!

 

I don't mind it, but after consumption my wife seems to gravitate to the other end of the couch 😁

  • Haha 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, TicTac said:

Also, have yet to try 'bottled' Italian dressing - I sort of make my own rendition, but I would be interested (though i do not believe I can find the brand referred to up here in Canada).

I used to make up my own vinaigrette with olive oil, but it would solidify in the fridge. I would have to take it out of the fridge for an hour or so to get it liquefied. One day I happened to notice the Kens Italian Dressing and Marinade, still in liquid form, right next to my solidified mushroom jar and the rest is history. It makes the process easier and the end product easier to use and still is quite good IMO.

HC

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, HungryChris said:

I used to make up my own vinaigrette with olive oil, but it would solidify in the fridge. I would have to take it out of the fridge for an hour or so to get it liquefied. One day I happened to notice the Kens Italian Dressing and Marinade, still in liquid form, right next to my solidified mushroom jar and the rest is history. It makes the process easier and the end product easier to use and still is quite good IMO.

HC

I have the same issue.  Coagulated oil floating around in bits and pieces...Not a pretty sight!

 

Will have to see if Ken travels North of the border...

 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, TicTac said:

I have the same issue.  Coagulated oil floating around in bits and pieces...Not a pretty sight!

 

Will have to see if Ken travels North of the border...

 

 

Well for a smidge over $125 you could get nine bottles of it from Amazon.ca.  Free shipping by the way. 

 

😂😂

  • Haha 1

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Well for a smidge over $125 you could get nine bottles of it from Amazon.ca.  Free shipping by the way. 

 

😂😂

Yikes!!!!!!

HC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, HungryChris said:

Yikes!!!!!!

HC

The ingredients in Ken’s and the ingredients in Kraft Zesty Italian are not too different.  And Kraft is available almost anywhere. 

  • Like 2

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Anna N said:

The ingredients in Ken’s and the ingredients in Kraft Zesty Italian are not too different.  And Kraft is available almost anywhere. 

 

I have many fond memories of Kraft Zesty Italian growing up as a kid, so that might be a nice blast from the past!

 

Good idea, @Anna N

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Newman's Own is a good one, too.

 

  • Like 3

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, TicTac said:

Will have to see if Ken travels North of the border...

 

 

I am in AZ and can buy it locally or order it for a reasonable price through Amazon, could send it to you now or once I return to Canada (BC) in April, if you would like. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Shelby said:

I keep a jar in the fridge at all times and it's never solidified on me.

@Shelby, are you using olive oil with that Spice House mix?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

8929C81E-5C2C-453D-B412-1DD5C4FBE65F.thumb.jpeg.8cb9131714b4e5d785710bb1e6382d60.jpeg

 

 Miso soup bombs.  These are red miso with wakame,  instant dashi and sliced scallions.  I know that miso soup is a breeze to make but it’s even breezier with these. Drop one into a soup bowl and add a cup of hot water and you’re done.   They keep well in the freezer.  

  • Like 9

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

776194D0-DC99-4D40-81C6-96D54FCC785D.thumb.jpeg.ae64593d4a23dd1fb7d1e832a92e7311.jpeg

 

More Asian pickled pears which I made yesterday. This time I cut them into much smaller pieces. I think the brine will have a better opportunity to fully season them this way. I also cooked them a little longer so they were not quite as firm as the last batch I made.   They will need a few days to age in the refrigerator before I can give them a fair taste test.

  • Like 6

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Spotted some pork tongues and snapped them up this morning. Into the Morton Tender Quick they went within minutes of their arrival at the house. See you in 2 weeks!

HC

IMG_3324.thumb.JPG.f162503e2125bde1be443bc2f62dd83a.JPG

 IMG_3329.thumb.JPG.c120f09b655eddea812d0a891b244dfa.JPG

  • Like 6
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I brined some fresh salmon from Aldi overnight, put it uncovered on a rack in the fridge for most of the day today. As soon as we got back from lunch (champagne brunch at Todd English's Tuscany), it went into the smoker with some hickory chips.

HC

IMG_3330.thumb.JPG.dfc3e162f45f03de3e1d81db96d2395c.JPGIMG_3332.thumb.JPG.b335b64b100b4ae54105415eef7ea0e0.JPGIMG_3334.thumb.JPG.429c95402c7602e8c03a7beef993cea7.JPG

  • Like 11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

 

 

A281D2E3-64EA-4E2F-A5A1-2002D1CBB23E.thumb.jpeg.0c8899621191feee5f63155dbdb29897.jpeg

 

Much more of a quickle than a pickle,  I thought it was a good way to deal with some cocktail tomatoes that were reaching the end of their useful life. @Shelbywill be pleased to know the tomatoes are peeled.

 

 What makes them Japanese you ask.  The brine which includes soy sauce, dashi, rice vinegar, salt and sugar.  I tasted the brine and had to hold myself back from inhaling it. 

 

 If anyone is interested here is the recipe.  I cut down on the sugar somewhat to suit my own taste. 

 


Edited by Anna N To remove an extraneous word that snuck in. (log)
  • Like 4

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Anna N said:

 

 

A281D2E3-64EA-4E2F-A5A1-2002D1CBB23E.thumb.jpeg.0c8899621191feee5f63155dbdb29897.jpeg

 

Much more of a quickle than a pickle,  I thought it was a good way to deal with some cocktail tomatoes that were reaching the end of their useful life. @Shelbywill be pleased to know the tomatoes are peeled.

 

 What makes them Japanese you ask.  The brine which includes soy sauce, dashi, rice vinegar, salt and sugar.  I tasted the brine and had to hold myself back from inhaling it. 

 

 If anyone is interested here is the recipe.  I cut down on the sugar somewhat to suit my own taste. 

 

 

ALWAYS relieved when I know those evil peels are banished.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Anna N said:

 

Much more of a quickle than a pickle,  I thought it was a good way to deal with some cocktail tomatoes that were reaching the end of their useful life. @Shelbywill be pleased to know the tomatoes are peeled.

 

 What makes them Japanese you ask.  The brine which includes soy sauce, dashi, rice vinegar, salt and sugar.  I tasted the brine and had to hold myself back from inhaling it. 

 

 If anyone is interested here is the recipe.  I cut down on the sugar somewhat to suit my own taste. 

 

 

 

These sound intriguing. Wonder how it would work with green tomatoes?


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, kayb said:

 

These sound intriguing. Wonder how it would work with green tomatoes?

 I don’t know but do remember that they are only good for a few days in the refrigerator.  Not a reliable method for dealing with a glut of tomatoes. 


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Someone in here -- @ElsieD, was it you? -- posted last fall about harvesting black walnuts. We had them everywhere, seemed like, when I was a kid, but they were typically passed over in favor of pecans which yielded more nutmeat per nut. Walnuts were often left for the squirrels and hogs, although I do remember the "old folks" dyeing cloth with the juice from the outer hulls.

 

I have of late discovered and become a confirmed fan of preserved walnuts. I've found a recipe, here. Be assured I will be on the lookout for black walnuts, which for these purposes should be picked before they fall, while they're still green) and trying to make my own.

 

Anybody tried making preserved walnuts? I don't recall how much these were at Kroger, but I checked Zingerman's, and they ain't cheap. There should be marvelous things I can do with the syrup, too.


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...