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Anna N

What Are You Preserving, and How Are You Doing It? (2016–)

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26 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

The meat is droole worthy!

Thanks.  Few things can be quite so easy!  


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Lovely work! Going to hold on to that process/recipe. Will pick up ducks one of these days at the Chinese market. Pastrami from the breasts, confit from the legs.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Question about the slicing.  Could one use a slicer machine or is it too ‘floppy’?

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5 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

Question about the slicing.  Could one use a slicer machine or is it too ‘floppy’?

 It isn’t floppy at all but quite firm. 


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Ok, good to know.  I think I will make some.  Thanks.

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@Anna N

 

I have been Sooooo   waiting for that pic and review.

 

thanks

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what could be better than easy and outstanding ?

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39F74350-A84C-4334-872D-1BED3A14E8B9.thumb.jpeg.3bd3b92aeae95b449c17baf82329024a.jpeg

 

 Asian pears with lemon, and radishes.  I made the Asian pear pickles once when @Kerry Beal and I were up in Manitoulin.  They were very good.  The radishes are quite pungent when you first open the jar.:o

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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15A61D03-689A-42C8-AE84-B32C88BB7B17.thumb.jpeg.e657c64711ccd4bf6a111f8952e93faf.jpeg

 

 “Wasabi” carrot pickles. Actually the recipe calls for horseradish rather than wasabi since real wasabi is almost impossible to source.  I suspect that these would appeal to @HungryChris  who is not afraid of a little heat. Here.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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@Anna N, could you share a link/recipe for the Asian pear pickles?


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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2 minutes ago, kayb said:

@Anna N, could you share a link/recipe for the Asian pear pickles?

 But of course. I have the book but I found this online and it’s the same recipe.

Click.

 

 The recipe suggests that the pears will take about six minutes to cook. Ha ha.   Mine took considerably longer — like about 24 minutes. YMMV. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Many thanks! Looks simple enough. They would work well with the pineapple pears from the tree up home, should it decide to bear this year.

 

 

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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On 2018-05-12 at 9:24 AM, Anna N said:

15A61D03-689A-42C8-AE84-B32C88BB7B17.thumb.jpeg.e657c64711ccd4bf6a111f8952e93faf.jpeg

 

 “Wasabi” carrot pickles. Actually the recipe calls for horseradish rather than wasabi since real wasabi is almost impossible to source.  I suspect that these would appeal to @HungryChris  who is not afraid of a little heat. Here.

The Silk Road Spice Merchant has Wasabi and they ship.  Actually, they have a lot of interesting spices.  All fresh.  https://silkroadspices.ca/products/wasabi-powder?variant=7246103543874

DSC02416.thumb.jpg.0dd0ea3488781782c56d4595b032f310.jpgDSC02417.thumb.jpg.1631ecac2246a88da560a088bc23a909.jpg


Edited by Okanagancook (log)
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Oh My !

 

Ive never had fresh wasabi grated just before you get your Sushi etc.

 

I did see , sometimes back . a reputable British food show 

 

and yes they are

 

that went so some place in GB that's growing it.  etc

 

in fresh water etc , and very secret as it so expensive and perishable.   

 

they tasted it fresh ground , and I have no reason to believe the shows 

 

presenter had any reason to exaggerate.

 

in Canada , rats.

 

however , is the real wasabi powder , when re-constituted 

 

worth the effort ?

 

Im keen to know.


Edited by rotuts (log)

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The powder isn't nearly as strong and hot as freshly grated.  It's quite mild.  I have used it in the Wasabi-soy vinaigrette from Raising the Salad Bar.  The dressing needed some cayenne/white pepper to get more of a kick.  If you are wild about wasabi, it's probably not worth it.

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9 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

The powder isn't nearly as strong and hot as freshly grated.  It's quite mild.  I have used it in the Wasabi-soy vinaigrette from Raising the Salad Bar.  The dressing needed some cayenne/white pepper to get more of a kick.  If you are wild about wasabi, it's probably not worth it.

 That was my thought. Thanks.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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@ElsieD

 

wow

had I known about this and it existed some time ago

 

I would have figured out how to grow in in MA

 

other :

 

thanks for your qualifiers 

 

Ill lust after something else

 

which is never a problem.

 

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I wrote about growing it for some publication or other. I don't remember who it was, just that I had a hell of a time getting paid.

 

It grows fine in temperate climates, but it's terribly temperamental. http://www.bbc.com/news/business-29082091

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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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On 5/12/2018 at 4:11 PM, Anna N said:

 But of course. I have the book but I found this online and it’s the same recipe.

Click.

 

 The recipe suggests that the pears will take about six minutes to cook. Ha ha.   Mine took considerably longer — like about 24 minutes. YMMV. 

A short while back, I posted on the Crazy Good eBook Bargains discussion that Karen Johnson had a number of Kindle ebooks regarding Asian pickling on sale (they're currently still sale priced).

You can visit her Amazon page here (click) to view her titles.


 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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Thanks, @Toliver. Not sure how I missed that first time around. Bought three of 'em. It's only money, right?

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Yesterday, I spied the first cherries of the year at the local farmers market.

IMG_7837.thumb.jpg.d0e5a3054019d2a31bbf789e637000d6.jpg

 

I ate a bunch and the rest went into the pickled cherries from Six Seasons

IMG_7844.thumb.jpg.084b1837fd1224663b754f032b2b4bb9.jpg

 

The book uses a standard brine for a variety of refrigerator pickles.  I found it on the sweet side for some of the vegetables but I'm hoping it will be good for these cherries.

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1 hour ago, blue_dolphin said:

Yesterday, I spied the first cherries of the year at the local farmers market.

IMG_7837.thumb.jpg.d0e5a3054019d2a31bbf789e637000d6.jpg

 

I ate a bunch and the rest went into the pickled cherries from Six Seasons

IMG_7844.thumb.jpg.084b1837fd1224663b754f032b2b4bb9.jpg

 

The book uses a standard brine for a variety of refrigerator pickles.  I found it on the sweet side for some of the vegetables but I'm hoping it will be good for these cherries.

Beautiful!

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 Made some coconut macaroons this morning and had four egg yolks that I couldn’t waste. 

 

5F893DF8-A9C1-4126-A06B-F20C0D96557C.thumb.jpeg.e5caf663f59d2a3ea9e3c2ac12fa4777.jpeg

 

 On their way to becoming salt-cured yolks, I hope. I suspect the yolk on the lower left is broken so it may not make the whole journey.  I took the photograph before they were completely buried in salt/sugar mix. They will now rest in the refrigerator for four days before spending further time being dehydrated in a low oven. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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