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Anna N

What Are You Preserving, and How Are You Doing It? (2016–)

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I'm with Deb. Sorry, but I've tried tongue, and I am most underwhelmed.

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2 minutes ago, kayb said:

I'm with Deb. Sorry, but I've tried tongue, and I am most underwhelmed.

The funny thing is that Deb had a bite of my tongue sandwich at the Second Avenue Deli, before it moved, and liked it, until she found out what it was. @kayb, I respect your opinion and admire that you tried it, knowing what it was. I tried it as a young lad, without knowing what it was and fell in love with it at once and learned to deal with it as a result.

HC

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I think I'd rather eat cow tongue than cow butt (round).

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8 minutes ago, HungryChris said:

The funny thing is that Deb had a bite of my tongue sandwich at the Second Avenue Deli, before it moved, and liked it, until she found out what it was. @kayb, I respect your opinion and admire that you tried it, knowing what it was. I tried it as a young lad, without knowing what it was and fell in love with it at once and learned to deal with it as a result.

HC

 

It's something about the texture that puts me off. Too chewy. Now, granted, what I ate was in Japan, so it may not all be that way.

 

You have to admit, though, in the whole-chunk state, it's pretty gross-looking.

 

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tongue , sliced very thin , makes a fantastic sandwich.   it has to be very thin and that probably means a slicer.

 

did you peel after the iPot Rx ?

 

I wonder what that muscle is at the very base of the tongue.

 

congratulations.

 

well worth it Id say.

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24 minutes ago, rotuts said:

tongue , sliced very thin , makes a fantastic sandwich.   it has to be very thin and that probably means a slicer.

 

did you peel after the iPot Rx ?

Yes, sliced thin, I daresay you could smear this like liverwurst, it's that tender. That is why I chill it before slicing. Once out of the Ipot, the skin peels off without issue. I once smoked one without boiling and I had to use a knife to get the skin off, a tedious and wasteful process.

HC

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31 minutes ago, kayb said:

You have to admit, though, in the whole-chunk state, it's pretty gross-looking.

 

Very much so! I helped my mother prepare one for a cocktail party as a kid and remember thinking, there is no way I would ever eat this. The next morning I tried it without knowing what it was and was instantly hooked.

HC

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My parents used to buy it occasionally when I was a kid. I used to take tongue sandwiches (just "pot roast" style, not corned) in my school lunch, which was great for grossing out my classmates. 

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Years ago I had a boss, otherwise a really nice person, who at lunchtime would put a big piece of tongue in his mouth and wag it around at people.

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I once had a secretary who wore these slippers one day, all day, with some sort of animal's head sculpted on top of it.  I forget what sort of animal it was, but it put a smile on everyone's face.  The biggest smile might have been mine.

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A beautiful looking hunk of tongue.  Well done,:wub::wub::wub:

Each to his/ her own but you have to admit it looks well crafted.

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@HungryChris I love tongue.  Growing up in Russia, it was considered a delicacy.  May be only in my family. I don't know for sure.  My cousin who grew up in Vilnius loves it too.  I usually just cook it in pressure cooker without brining.  Tastes better than short ribs.

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7 hours ago, chefmd said:

@HungryChris I love tongue.  Growing up in Russia, it was considered a delicacy.  May be only in my family. I don't know for sure.  My cousin who grew up in Vilnius loves it too.  I usually just cook it in pressure cooker without brining.  Tastes better than short ribs.

It definitely is a delicacy and based on the ever rising price, one that is growing in popularity.

HC

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 Finally, finally I had all the right pieces and the time to assemble @HungryChris‘ marinated mushrooms.  Did not have enough of anything for a full recipe so I made a partial one. 

 

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 And although it’s not summer I felt a need to make a small portion of @ElainaA‘s  slow roasted cherry tomatoes. 

 

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On 12/1/2017 at 1:43 AM, blue_dolphin said:

 

A while back, over in the Dinner thread, I asked @sartoric about the Indian lime pickle recipe and she kindly responded with a link to this recipe.

I made a batch - I didn't process, just stored in the fridge.  My tree is loaded again so it's probably time for another batch!

 

On 12/1/2017 at 3:01 PM, sartoric said:

Thanks for taking care of this @blue_dolphin, I make a batch every month or so now. It stores well in the cupboard here :)

 

On 12/1/2017 at 6:06 PM, sartoric said:

<snip> The lime pickle goes quickly around here. A kaffir lime pickle i experimented with using the same recipe is not so popular, it has kept well for several months.

 

This has been on my list to try for a while.  I just made a small batch, using the recipe linked above.  I have no Persian limes - the type we usually think of as limes in this country - but I have a number of Mexican limes, so that's what I used.  It'll be interesting to see what we think in a few days. @sartoric, @blue_dolphin, and anyone else with experience: when you experiment with the pickle recipes, what adjustments do you make to compensate for varying sweetness of the fruit?  These Mexican limes aren't as sweet as Persian limes. 

20180204_125500.jpg

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@Smithy, thanks for encouraging my education via Wikipedia on the various types of limes. Here they’re mostly Tahitian limes, which are what you know as Persian limes. I guess adjusting the sugar would be the way to compensate, although I never try a batch before maturing, we enjoy the surprise. Your pickle looks great.

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I turned my head the other day while picking herbs and this kumquat caught my eye.nI have absolutely no recollection of this guy but I must have helped plant it 40+ years ago.

I wanted to do a one batch marmalade and cobbled together some online recipes. They have only had rain water and we've been in a drought with just a bit of rain last spring so fruit is tiny tiny. Almost no pulp/juice so I addded some from the crazy tangerine (up-topic). It came out nicely bitter which I like and not too sweet. A good day :)

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Edited by heidih (log)
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@heidih I recently had pickled kumquat. Fantastic accent to a kampachi dish. They were thin slices of what looked to be grape tomato-sized fruit. I would pickle some asap

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Thanks - i'll plan on it. They are on a slope and hard to reach but I'll enlist some help


Edited by heidih (log)
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I've had kumquat marmalade once and thought it was the very best marmalade I'd ever had.  I don't know whether it was because of the recipe or the kumquats.  As a rule, I'm not a marmalade fan, but this was enough to change my mind.

 

I'll be interested to hear how the pickling goes.  It also sounds like a delicious way to use those little fruits!

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On 12/1/2017 at 1:43 AM, blue_dolphin said:

 

A while back, over in the Dinner thread, I asked @sartoric about the Indian lime pickle recipe and she kindly responded with a link to this recipe.

I made a batch - I didn't process, just stored in the fridge.  My tree is loaded again so it's probably time for another batch!

 

I opened my jar's worth today for the first time.  I used it to season cooked rice that had been mixed with cooked broccoli, raw shaved red cabbage, and sunflower seeds.  Delicious!

 

20180228_175831.jpg

 

Top photo: the contents of the jar.  Bottom photo: the (Mexican) lime pickle, and some preserved lemons, all chopped and ready for the rice.

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Spotted some beautiful Kirbys today and decided to pickle them whole. Then, I found some fresh looking, but skinny asparagus @ 99 cents pp.  I like pickled asparagus, but I also like marinated asparagus, which are like the pickles, but include Italian dressing, at the expense of some of the white vinegar. The repurposed kimchi jars I use require me to trim the asparagus a bit short, so I added the still tender parts left on the stem to my never ending batch of marinated vegetables, along with some zucchini ribbons and sliced onions.

HC

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Last, but not least, pickled raw turnip with sliced roasted beets.

HC

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Pink pickled turnips are one of my favorite pickles 

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ferments.JPG.faf033caf3bcc8186c23d7c0db86c291.JPG

 

With a surfeit of fresh veggies in the fridge, and dinner plans that don't include them, along with air-lock fermenting lids and glass weights I haven't used, I decided to make some assorted ferments. From left, kimchi brussels sprouts, Russian sauerkraut made with red cabbage and cranberries, and Indian spiced cauliflower. They'll bask and bubble for a while, and then go into the fridge.

 

And the color combo is pretty!

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