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Anna N

What Are You Preserving, and How Are You Doing It? (2016–)

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On 3/14/2017 at 10:22 PM, sartoric said:

Lemon/lime pickle. Some of the limes are from the farmers market, the lemons are from our dwarf tree.

 

Salting the fruit.

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The ingredients, the grated stuff is jaggery, black mustard seeds in the bowl.

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Finished cooking.

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Sartoric, this is from several months back, but could you post the exact recipe for these? 

 

If anyone else has an Indian-style lime pickle, I'd love to have their recipe.    

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6 minutes ago, SLB said:

Sartoric, this is from several months back, but could you post the exact recipe for these? 

 

If anyone else has an Indian-style lime pickle, I'd love to have their recipe.    

 

I'll add that if someone can post an Arabic-style pickle and explain why it isn't the same as an Indian-style pickle, I'd love to see it.  I don't know what distinguishes one from the other.  I suspect that there are at least half a dozen different Arabic-style pickles, depending on the country of origin.  it's probably the same for the Indian-style pickle.

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5 hours ago, SLB said:

Sartoric, this is from several months back, but could you post the exact recipe for these? 

If anyone else has an Indian-style lime pickle, I'd love to have their recipe.    

 

A while back, over in the Dinner thread, I asked @sartoric about the Indian lime pickle recipe and she kindly responded with a link to this recipe.

I made a batch - I didn't process, just stored in the fridge.  My tree is loaded again so it's probably time for another batch!

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13 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

A while back, over in the Dinner thread, I asked @sartoric about the Indian lime pickle recipe and she kindly responded with a link to this recipe.

I made a batch - I didn't process, just stored in the fridge.  My tree is loaded again so it's probably time for another batch!

Thanks for taking care of this @blue_dolphin, I make a batch every month or so now. It stores well in the cupboard here :)

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Thanks for chiming in, @sartoric.  

 

And just to clarify -- you store in the cupboard without additional processing, just with the vinegar-plus pack? 

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2 hours ago, SLB said:

Thanks for chiming in, @sartoric.  

 

And just to clarify -- you store in the cupboard without additional processing, just with the vinegar-plus pack? 

Correct, I sterilise the jar with hot rinse then low oven, that’s all. The lime pickle goes quickly around here. A kaffir lime pickle i experimented with using the same recipe is not so popular, it has kept well for several months.

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Thanks, that is useful.  

 

Beyond the lime pickle, I've found this thread inspiring, and also stunning.  I stumbled in here because I was researching a freezing method for something or other, which led me to  preserving generally.  

 

Now I'm trying to locate some space in my apartment kitchen for some new gear . . . .


Edited by SLB (log)
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5a2619e235ebe_halfsours1204.jpg.fb0ea877959814325342d703487dec5e.jpg

As if it weren't bad enough with all you eGullet enablers out there, the damn produce at the store is now encouraging me toward the purchase of all manner of kitchen widgetry I did not know I needed.

 

I came across really nice Kirby cucumbers, about six inches long and an inch or so in diameter, dead cheap at Aldi the other day. Bought two packages. Which then necessitated me going home and buying these fermenting lids. And, while I was about it, some half-gallon jars (because quarts were the largest I had on hand), and some weights. 

 

So now I have two quarts of someday half-sours in the brine, perched on my countertop. Should have used fresh dill, but I didn't have any, so I made do with dried. Will report on the pickles once they're through fermenting.

 

 

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10 hours ago, kayb said:

5a2619e235ebe_halfsours1204.jpg.fb0ea877959814325342d703487dec5e.jpg

As if it weren't bad enough with all you eGullet enablers out there, the damn produce at the store is now encouraging me toward the purchase of all manner of kitchen widgetry I did not know I needed.

 

I came across really nice Kirby cucumbers, about six inches long and an inch or so in diameter, dead cheap at Aldi the other day. Bought two packages. Which then necessitated me going home and buying these fermenting lids. And, while I was about it, some half-gallon jars (because quarts were the largest I had on hand), and some weights. 

 

So now I have two quarts of someday half-sours in the brine, perched on my countertop. Should have used fresh dill, but I didn't have any, so I made do with dried. Will report on the pickles once they're through fermenting.

 

 

They look very Christmasy :D

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On 11/28/2017 at 10:07 PM, kayb said:

Chopped berries, I presume?

 

 

Sorry, I missed your question until now.

Just halved.

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Baked Beans! I think a lot of the canned varieties at the store are just plain bland.  No real kick to them.  So, I got out some dried beans, did a fast-soak, made some sauce, and here they are.  At the moment, they're in the oven baking. From there, I will put them in either pint or quart jars, and into the pressure canner they shall go.  

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ChocoMom, I have an excellent family recipe for baked beans that has ground beef in it. I encourage you to give it a try.  

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Initially, I messed up a bit and added a little too much vinegar. So, it seemed logical to add base. So, I fizzed the baked beans a little with adding a teensy bit of baking soda. Problem solved.  Here's the finished product. 9/10 sealed, so we "tested out" the unsealed jar. Good stuff. 

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Mushrooms.  I'm comparing HungryChris's pickled 'shrooms with two pickle recipes from the Joy of Pickling, the "Marinated Herbed Mushrooms", and "Polish Mushroom Pickles".  None of these is processed.

 

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I kinda messed up the HungryChris procedure, I made my own vinaigrette instead of the prescribed "good Italian dressing", which I didn't have.  

 

 My own vinaigrette was tasty enough, but the olive oil in it promptly solidified -- duh -- making for a nice grease cap.  Not the worst that could happen, but not adding much to the flavor mingle, either.  

 

Also, I'm pickling a very small quantity of aji dulce peppers that some nice dude had at the farmer's market.   They were delicious raw, I hope I don't mess 'em up.  
 

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5 hours ago, SLB said:

Mushrooms.  I'm comparing HungryChris's pickled 'shrooms with two pickle recipes from the Joy of Pickling, the "Marinated Herbed Mushrooms", and "Polish Mushroom Pickles".  None of these is processed.

 

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I kinda messed up the HungryChris procedure, I made my own vinaigrette instead of the prescribed "good Italian dressing", which I didn't have.  

 

 My own vinaigrette was tasty enough, but the olive oil in it promptly solidified -- duh -- making for a nice grease cap.  Not the worst that could happen, but not adding much to the flavor mingle, either.  

 

Also, I'm pickling a very small quantity of aji dulce peppers that some nice dude had at the farmer's market.   They were delicious raw, I hope I don't mess 'em up.  
 

 

You need a rotor stator homogenizer.

 

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13 hours ago, SLB said:

 

 

 

I kinda messed up the HungryChris procedure, I made my own vinaigrette instead of the prescribed "good Italian dressing", which I didn't have.  

 

 My own vinaigrette was tasty enough, but the olive oil in it promptly solidified -- duh -- making for a nice grease cap.  Not the worst that could happen, but not adding much to the flavor mingle, either.    
 

You just reminded me that I learned that same lesson quite a few years ago. Thanks for the refresher!!! I used to put them out on the counter to let them warm enough to liquefy the olive oil an hour before serving. One day I spotted the Kens Italian Dressing, in liquid form,  next to my marinated mushrooms in solid form, in the fridge, and the rest was history.

HC

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11 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

You need a rotor stator homogenizer.

 

I mean, it is the holidays . . . .

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Here is my wee batch of very-late-season aji dulce peppers, with a few hotter ones in there for good measure.  I started out thinking I was going to use a recipe with strong seasonings like horseradish, and mid-stream realized that I was not gonna do alla that.  Because I like basic pickled peppers on my food (the kind you buy at the store!). 

 

Plus, I kind of wanted to taste just this pepper. 

 

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Edited by SLB (log)
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One tangeine tree is doing its usual "over achiever" thing + low quality figs from $1 store in pantry = micro batch of jam. I only used strips of the citrus zest and some juice, brown sugar,  plus just hint of pumpkin pie spice blend and balsamic. Initially I just chopped the figs but they tumbled off my toast this morning so I whizzed it up with more juice and water, re-boiled and its pretty tasty now.

 

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Hi,

 

I'm preserving chills by fermentation.

 

It is the first time that I do this.

 

I have blended the chills with water, salt and a little sugar.

 

Now they are fermenting for 2 week. 

 

I not sure  what do next.

 

I read some recipes  in the internet. Some add vinegar others cook the mixture, their  are various alternatives.  Can someone help me choose? 

 

Thanks,

 

 

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You can transfer the chilis to a canning jar and can in a water bath for 10 minutes at a boil, then cool. Should be shelf-stable. I see no need to either use vinegar or cook the mixture, unless you want to for the taste.

 

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Today, I cooked the corned beef tongue that has been brining in Morton Tender Quick solution for 3 weeks in the downstairs fridge. Keep in mind that this whole process is carried out covertly on my part because Deb wants nothing to do with it. As a result, all operations must be conducted "off hours" and on a carefully crafted schedule. This particular specimen, was brined concealed in the crisper of the downstairs fridge, where Deb never ventures. If I so much as hint that it is going on or that she might want to sample the results, it's greeted with a rolled eye, a shaken head and a muttered "Oh, Brother!".

Nevertheless, I persist. Here is the tongue after 90 minutes in the IP with natural release. It has been peeled, chilled and trimmed of excess fat.

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Because I am the only one in the household who eats this, I generally cut it in half at this stage and freeze half.

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I desperately wanted a sandwich for lunch, so I put it on the slicer and sliced up a generous amount for a nice sandwich and proceeded to make one with Swiss cheese on lightly toasted rye.IMG_1786.thumb.JPG.e4cb3410a15faee587c238651368813a.JPG

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A freshly opened growler of Dogs & Boats,  American DIPA rounded things out nicely.

HC

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Edited by HungryChris (log)
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37 minutes ago, gfweb said:

@HungryChris Looks perfect . What spices were in the brine?

 

For the brine, I use 1 1/2 cups of Morton Tender Quick, 6 cups of water. I inject the beef thoroughly to ensure distribution. I add 3 or 4 bay leaves, some mustard seed and a few peppercorns. Experience has taught me to let it go for 3 weeks to ensure no "pot roast" brown interior areas. I find the  brine  seasonings are far less effective than those in the cooking process. For that, I rinse off the tongue, just cover it with water in the IP, add a half cup of Crystal hot sauce, half cup of cider vinegar and 3 or 4 bay leaves and cook on high pressure for 90 minutes. As soon as the pressure drops enough to open the pot, I take it out (this time I put it in the snow on the deck) until I can bag the tongue and put it in the fridge to chill. It is a time consuming effort, but once you sample the result, worth every bit of it!!

HC


Edited by HungryChris (log)
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