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Your Daily Sweets: What Are You Making and Baking? (2016 – 2017)


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It looks wonderful. 

 

I have about five bags of red currants from my parents' bushes in my freezer at home...gonna have to do something with those one day soon, I think. 

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Today my proposal is how to get used to chia seeds in desserts. Though at first you might object to the dessert's consistency, it is worth persevering because it is really tasty.


Ingredients (for 2 people)
2 tablespoons of chia seeds
50ml of milk
200ml of coconut milk
4 tablespoons of honey
½ teaspoon of vanilla essence
3 plums
half an apple
1 tablespoon of butter
2 tablespoons of lemon juice

 

the whole recipe is here

 

 

DSC_0672b.jpg

DSC_0673c.jpg

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Kasia Warsaw/Poland

www.home-madepatchwork.com

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Yesterday I made an upside down nectarine cake. These were recalcitrant nectarines who clung to their stone like crazy, sending me crazy trying to separate them. Does anyone know an easy way to de stone fruit like this ?

IMG_3392.thumb.JPG.386eb4cbf09d206bf6a61d16b5af9b08.JPG

 

 

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For some silly reason, I think that I should only make lemon bars in Spring.  And while I associate lemon bars with Spring, I should think I need to make them more often.

Raspberry Lemon Bars.JPG

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9 hours ago, sartoric said:

Yesterday I made an upside down nectarine cake. These were recalcitrant nectarines who clung to their stone like crazy, sending me crazy trying to separate them. Does anyone know an easy way to de stone fruit like this ?

IMG_3392.thumb.JPG.386eb4cbf09d206bf6a61d16b5af9b08.JPG

 

 

I blanch and chill them to slip the skin off then cut them into narrow wedges right to the stone. I sacrifice one slice to make a "portal" then use a curved citrus knife to separate the flesh from the stone.  

I've been doing this about 60 years, first with cling peaches, then nectarines, large plums, etc., and have never found an easier method. 

Once you get the "trick" of it, you will find it is fast and easy.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Boiled no egg fruitcake. 

I acquired a booklet in 1974 from Lowan Whole Foods. They had just imported a 36 inch Baltic stone mill to grind their locally grown wheat, pretty exotic in rural Australia then. Anyway, I recall making this cake sometime in the '70s, and enjoying it. Some things never change.

 

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17 hours ago, sartoric said:

Boiled no egg fruitcake. 

I acquired a booklet in 1974 from Lowan Whole Foods. They had just imported a 36 inch Baltic stone mill to grind their locally grown wheat, pretty exotic in rural Australia then. Anyway, I recall making this cake sometime in the '70s, and enjoying it. Some things never change.

 

IMG_3424.thumb.JPG.f44a43acb50d62f24ca2cd658c560921.JPGIMG_3916.thumb.JPG.62365613b7d801e8ffd859b43e5910ac.JPG

 

 

What kind of fruit is in there?  In appearance it looks like a cake my mother used to make which was raisin based.  She would boil the raisins prior to incorporating them into the batter.  I hadn't thought of it in a long time until you posted this.

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Today I would like to share with you a very common cake we do in Poland - poppy-seed cake. We do it very often for Christmas or Easter holidays. Some people say it helps them to fall asleep :) 

 

Ingredients:
1 tin of poppyseed mass
4 eggs
1 vanilla pudding
1 tablespoon of flour
125g of butter
200g of brown sugar
150g of white chocolate
a fistful of chopped hazelnuts
a fistful of raisins

 

the whole recipe here

 

 

DSC_0681b.jpg

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Kasia Warsaw/Poland

www.home-madepatchwork.com

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On 3/29/2017 at 5:03 PM, David Ross said:

For some silly reason, I think that I should only make lemon bars in Spring.  And while I associate lemon bars with Spring, I should think I need to make them more often.

Raspberry Lemon Bars.JPG

Dear David Ross the picture is tempting :) could you share the recipe for these bars?

Edited by Kasia (log)

Kasia Warsaw/Poland

www.home-madepatchwork.com

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@Kasia

 

 You are more likely to attract David's attention using the @ feature.  That way when he logs on he will get a notification that his name has appeared in a post. It is easy to use. Just type the at (@) symbol and then begin typing the poster's name. You can then click on that name and it will insert it into your post.

@David Ross

I hope he gets this and responds to your request. 

Edited by Anna N (log)
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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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Glad to share.  I start with a shortbread style crust in a 9 x 9 glass baking dish.  A lot of recipes call for a 9 x 13 dish, but I like the lemon bars really thick rather than thin so I use the small baking dish.  The amount of lemon juice and zest would be surprising to a lot of folks, but that's what gives the bars deep lemon flavor.

Filling-

1/2 cup flour

2 cups sugar

1 1/4 cups fresh lemon juice

Grated lemon zest from a medium-size lemon

6 eggs

1 egg yolk

1/4 tsp. salt

 

Stir the flour and sugar together in a large bowl.  Add the lemon juice and lemon zest and stir to combine.  In a another bowl, add the eggs, egg yolk and salt and whisk.  Add the egg mixture to the bowl with the flour, sugar and lemon juice and whisk until smooth. 

 

Crust-

1 cup flour

1/2 cup melted butter

1/3 cup powdered sugar.

Sift the flour and powdered sugar together into a bowl.  Pour in the melted butter and stir to combine until it comes together into a dough.  Form the dough into a layer in the bottom of the baking dish. I put a sheet of parchment in the bottom of the dish, large enough so the parchment reaches over the top of the baking dish.  This allows me to pull the lemon bar "tart" out of the baking dish once it's cooled.  Put a small sheet of parchment on top of the dough and add pie weights.  (I happen to use dried beans for weight to keep the crust from rising).

 

Par-bake the crust in a 350 oven for about 15 minutes just until the edges start to turn golden.  Pull the crust out of the oven and pour in the lemon filling and return the baking dish to the oven.  Reduce the temp to 325 and bake for about 35 minutes until the center of the filling is set.

 

Cool the lemon bars in the baking dish to room temperature, then cover and cool in the fridge for about 6 hours.  (It has to be chilled so when you sprinkle the powdered sugar on top it doesn't melt).  Pull the lemon bar "tart" out of the baking dish.  Dust the top with powdered sugar (through a fine mesh screen) and dot with fresh raspberries.  I also use blackberries, marionberries and loganberries in the summer.  It's also good with poached rhubarb.

 

Hope that helps.  You'll like the recipe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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When I made these I got a lot of positive likes on my Facebook page.  But what's funny is a lot of my friends like to bake and make sweets, yet they all said they had never made lemon bars because they were "too hard" and took "too much time."  They were also surprised that I used so much lemon juice.  The recipes they had looked at called from somewhere in the range of 2 or 3 tbsp. of lemon juice.  Well, I think with my photo it convinced them. 

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30 minutes ago, Kasia said:

My kids love them - Raspberry “kisses”

 

DSC_0517a.jpg

 

Those are very pretty! I don't think I've seen basil paired with chocolate or raspberry before. Is it just for looks, or do the flavors play well together?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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15 minutes ago, Smithy said:

 

Those are very pretty! I don't think I've seen basil paired with chocolate or raspberry before. Is it just for looks, or do the flavors play well together?

 

Basil is mainly for the presentation however........ my husband ate everything  :P

Edited by Kasia (log)
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Kasia Warsaw/Poland

www.home-madepatchwork.com

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On ‎4‎/‎5‎/‎2017 at 7:04 AM, David Ross said:

Glad to share.  I start with a shortbread style crust in a 9 x 9 glass baking dish.  A lot of recipes call for a 9 x 13 dish, but I like the lemon bars really thick rather than thin so I use the small baking dish.  The amount of lemon juice and zest would be surprising to a lot of folks, but that's what gives the bars deep lemon flavor.

Filling-

1/2 cup flour

2 cups sugar

1 1/4 cups fresh lemon juice

Grated lemon zest from a medium-size lemon

6 eggs

1 egg yolk

1/4 tsp. salt

 

Stir the flour and sugar together in a large bowl.  Add the lemon juice and lemon zest and stir to combine.  In a another bowl, add the eggs, egg yolk and salt and whisk.  Add the egg mixture to the bowl with the flour, sugar and lemon juice and whisk until smooth. 

 

Crust-

1 cup flour

1/2 cup melted butter

1/3 cup powdered sugar.

Sift the flour and powdered sugar together into a bowl.  Pour in the melted butter and stir to combine until it comes together into a dough.  Form the dough into a layer in the bottom of the baking dish. I put a sheet of parchment in the bottom of the dish, large enough so the parchment reaches over the top of the baking dish.  This allows me to pull the lemon bar "tart" out of the baking dish once it's cooled.  Put a small sheet of parchment on top of the dough and add pie weights.  (I happen to use dried beans for weight to keep the crust from rising).

 

Par-bake the crust in a 350 oven for about 15 minutes just until the edges start to turn golden.  Pull the crust out of the oven and pour in the lemon filling and return the baking dish to the oven.  Reduce the temp to 325 and bake for about 35 minutes until the center of the filling is set.

 

Cool the lemon bars in the baking dish to room temperature, then cover and cool in the fridge for about 6 hours.  (It has to be chilled so when you sprinkle the powdered sugar on top it doesn't melt).  Pull the lemon bar "tart" out of the baking dish.  Dust the top with powdered sugar (through a fine mesh screen) and dot with fresh raspberries.  I also use blackberries, marionberries and loganberries in the summer.  It's also good with poached rhubarb.

 

Hope that helps.  You'll like the recipe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I've never tried it, so you can give it a shot. My sense is the lemon filling wouldn't hold up well and when defrosted, it might separate or be mushy.

 

@David Ross. Dumb question - can this be frozen?  After baking it of course.  Thank you.

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